Rookvale: Gender?

edited September 2013 in Story Games
So Rookvale looks incredibly cool. But I don't really get how gender is supposed to work. Does anyone get what's going on there?
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  • edited September 2013
    I thought gender was one of the cooler bits.

    Are you wondering mechanically, or in the setting? I think a lot of the flavour is left undefined as a prompt to players.

    Ladies govern, and rightfully so; I suppose when a lady takes a jack to raise her children, he becomes a father. Mendicants ... well, they don't really belong in a family at all, do they? Even a jack knows that one of these days he's going to have to stop living off his family.

    And tinders? Well, I'm from Tabis, mate. Why don't you ask a Liansjack about those perverts?

    EDIT: Monasts, not mendicants. Damn. From my experience, most people just call the few monasts they stumble upon 'it'.

    See them all here: http://buriedwithoutceremony.com/Rookvale
  • To me, it looks like Rookvale points out that gender is not something that's inherently tied to biological traits, status, etc.; it's something that defines part of your role and personality, but it can change. While historically, for example, people have assumed that women of a certain status will be Ladies and therefore they will be x and do y, anyone can be x and do y. Men can be nurturers. Women can be warriors. The way Rookvale does it is acknowledge that these roles exist, but they aren't tied down. So my male coal miner can be a Lady at times.
  • I'm a terrible person and Joe should never play test with me.
  • I think gender in Rookvale is kind of filling a niche that "race" (as in, nonhuman species) fills in a lot of other games – both a character descriptor and a unique mechanical bonus. Unlike species, though, gender is more easily understood as a flexible, culturally-defined thing, and Rookvale explicitly calls this out by including six genders and rules for switching gender during play.

    Or, to put it another way: The mechanics would probably work just the same if you replaced the word "gender" with "style" or "tradition," but you'd be missing out on one of the more unique and interesting aspects of the setting.
  • edited September 2013
    Ladies govern, and rightfully so; I suppose when a lady takes a jack to raise her children, he becomes a father. Mendicants ... well, they don't really belong in a family at all, do they? Even a jack knows that one of these days he's going to have to stop living off his family.
    That sounds plausible.

    Or if a lady takes a lady to raise her children, she becomes a father.

    Or if a father loses his children to a demon siege, he faces a choice. Maybe he becomes a roving Jack, or becomes a Tinder and heads to Canter to raise hell, or becomes a Lady and rallies her community around rebuilding efforts.

    *shrugs*

    The only concrete thing that is said about each of the genders is their mechanical bonus. So you can try to read flavour into their mechanical effects, or you can guess at my intent, or you can just create your own definitions through play. We know ladies rule, and that tinder aren't welcome in Tabis. That's sort of it. That's all we know.
  • So Rookvale looks incredibly cool. But I don't really get how gender is supposed to work. Does anyone get what's going on there?
    Fighting adventure games usually have regressive politics. The six genders of Rookvale is a playful injection of radical politics.

    Why are there not just the two genders you're familiar with? Because we don't live in a world with two fixed genders, despite what cultural hegemons tell us. We live in a world where people have complicated relationships to masculinity, femininity, and gender. We live in a world with intersex people, transgender people, non-binary genders, gender rebels, and evolving patterns of gender resistance. Our relationships to gender are prone to change. Gender is weird and the people who tell you otherwise probably have an oppressive agenda.

    This stuff matters to me, as a queer genderqueer trying to sort out their relationship to hegemonic culture.

    And so Rookvale is a genderqueer place. People change genders. There are lots of different, evolving gender identities. Some are treated with hostility and ostracism in some areas (because inserting queer politics into your game doesn't mean you need to treat queer people gently), there are weird rules about what you are and aren't allowed to talk about in mixed company.

    So mechanically, Genders in Rookvale are just a way to group a set of six passive powers. They are a direct equivalent to Passions in Anima Prime (the parent game). You pick a Gender for your character and boom, you get a cool power that helps you earn Charge dice or whatever.

    And story-wise, it's saying "Rookvale is a weird, queer place that's worth exploring between your battles. What's a Monast? How does a Monast dress? What would it mean to transition from being a Monast to being a Lady after a particularly harrowing fight?"
  • I'm a terrible person and Joe should never play test with me.
    Yeah but I told him to do this, too, and I'm a genius.
  • Yeah but I told him to do this, too, and I'm a genius.
    It was a terrible idea when Orlando said it, but a brilliant idea when you said it twenty seconds later. And then Amy said it, and damn, it was just pure genius at that point.
  • I need help with this, but maybe not the sort of help you'd expect.
    If I'm gonna play Rooksvale, I'm most likely gonna play it in Italian (my native language), performing on-the-spot translations of keywords to the benefit of my fellow players. And those six genders are "keywords" which I'm not sure how to translate, because I don't have much of a reference frame for them!
    I understand from this thread that leaving the reference frame blank, for the players to fill in, is exactly what Joe was aiming for. But this is one of those thing that risk getting lost in translation.

    So, my question to y'all, native English speakers, is: what do you associate with the six Rooksvale genders? I mean, subjectively, based on the little information provided on the cards. How do you imagine a Jack behaving, or a Tinder dressing, etc.?
  • @Rafu: To attempt to answer your question, "Lady" and "Father" seems pretty straightforward ("signora", "padre"), but even then you and I might want to flesh them out differently. "Jack", to me anyway, would suggest a knave or a rogue (what do you call/associate with the card that comes after 10 in a deck of cards? The "hero" who slayed the giant after climbing a magic beanstalk?): but that's even more widely open to interpretation.

    Mug? Well, I guess there might be a transatlantic divide over that one: http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=mug - I guess this would be a thug or "heavy" in this context, as opposed to an idiot.

    Tinder? I'd have to think about that. By tinder I understand something like kindling; something dry and combustible that you use to light a fire. So, maybe someone who is quick to start a fight?

    Monast? Even less clear. It isn't an English word. I'd guess it would be a monk (as in monastery), ascetic or Jedi.

    Hopefully that's some kind of help and at least gets you started, but I'm guessing the point is to explore the meaning of these yourself.



  • With the caveat that I'm doing a lot of projecting here, I would venture to say....

    "Mug" to me suggests a tough guy, maybe a soldier or a warrior. Someone who's had their nose broke a couple of times, or took a scar. So they have an "ugly mug." (It's an old slang term for "face", like when the police take mug shots.)

    "Jack" is maybe a jack-of-all-trades, or a knave? It's what we call playing cards with faces that aren't the king or the queen. (I think it's called "fante" in Italian?) The oldest connotations involve being a faithful servant, but the modern connotation has a little bit of a roguishness to it. Maybe it's someone who is not the leader but knows how to get things done behind the scenes, maybe through a little charm and guile.

    "Tinder" is a total cipher to me. It sounds dangerous, though, like the world is a powder keg and this person is about to light the fuse.
  • It is worth pointing out that you'd be open to the accusation of projecting if asked to define "male" and "female" as well. The real lesson here is that ultimately gender definitions are bullshit; they're meant to be ambiguous and impossible to pin down.
  • For sure, absolutely! This is especially obvious wrt "father" and "lady"!
  • Tinder is what you use to start fires. Like, "Flint and Tinder". It's a step below kindling. (Kindling you need a match to ignite, but Tinder only requires a spark.) Which is pretty exciting as a gender-concept to explore!

    "Monast" says to me philosophical, spiritual, and kind of solitary. Like Monk, yeah, or maybe "Monad" if you want to get fancy-pants.
  • But I don't really get how gender is supposed to work. Does anyone get what's going on there?
    Amen.

  • "Mug" to me suggests a tough guy, maybe a soldier or a warrior. Someone who's had their nose broke a couple of times, or took a scar. So they have an "ugly mug." (It's an old slang term for "face", like when the police take mug shots.)
    This is what inspired me originally. I envisioned Mugs being tough folk who're rough around the edges. Many mugs would be proud of their scars. Some of the mugs who got pregnant would view their pregnancy as a triumph of blood and endurance, a battle against their own limits.

    Which isn't to say that all mugs would be the same or think the same. But in my mind, as I was writing, those were some of the hallmarks of a mug.

    (But since I didn't write any of that in the book, none of it is canon. When you play Rookvale, you and your crew get to decide what mugs dress and behave like!)
  • So they have an "ugly mug." (It's an old slang term for "face", like when the police take mug shots.)
    This is gold! Thank you.

    Also, to those who brought this up: yes, a "jack" in playing cards is called a "fante" in Italian.
    Fante literally means foot-soldier, which makes sense besides a knight or horseman card (the second-highest "face" card in many Italian traditional decks, which don't include any queen design — though the word "donna" [woman or lady] is used for it in some games, regardless of the card depicting a horseman; otherwise, it's known as a "cavallo", or horse, just like the knight in chess).
  • Funny thing, I read "monast" as "monist" and assumed it was some sorta rebel which believed all genders are one!

    - Alex
  • So Rookvale looks incredibly cool. But I don't really get how gender is supposed to work. Does anyone get what's going on there?
    Fighting adventure games usually have regressive politics. The six genders of Rookvale is a playful injection of radical politics.

    Why are there not just the two genders you're familiar with? Because we don't live in a world with two fixed genders, despite what cultural hegemons tell us. We live in a world where people have complicated relationships to masculinity, femininity, and gender. We live in a world with intersex people, transgender people, non-binary genders, gender rebels, and evolving patterns of gender resistance. Our relationships to gender are prone to change. Gender is weird and the people who tell you otherwise probably have an oppressive agenda.

    This stuff matters to me, as a queer genderqueer trying to sort out their relationship to hegemonic culture.

    And so Rookvale is a genderqueer place. People change genders. There are lots of different, evolving gender identities. Some are treated with hostility and ostracism in some areas (because inserting queer politics into your game doesn't mean you need to treat queer people gently), there are weird rules about what you are and aren't allowed to talk about in mixed company.

    So mechanically, Genders in Rookvale are just a way to group a set of six passive powers. They are a direct equivalent to Passions in Anima Prime (the parent game). You pick a Gender for your character and boom, you get a cool power that helps you earn Charge dice or whatever.

    And story-wise, it's saying "Rookvale is a weird, queer place that's worth exploring between your battles. What's a Monast? How does a Monast dress? What would it mean to transition from being a Monast to being a Lady after a particularly harrowing fight?"
    Let me clarify. When I say "I don't get how gender is supposed to work", I don't mean "I don't get why Joe is including this gender mechanic". That bit I do get, and is one of the reasons I think the game is cool. What I didn't get is what I'm supposed to make out of the words Lady, Father, Mug, Monast, Jack, and Tinder.

    I feel like I'd be more comfortable having more to start with (The bits about Ladies ruling and Tinders not being welcomed in one province is a good example of what I'd like more of). Finding out through play is cool, but players will be picking gender at character creation. Half my players don't like playing characters of another gender. I'd certainly not want to have them discover through play that the character is of a gender that the player is not comfortable with*.

    I guess what I'm really looking for is something that I as GM can say is true of various genders when the game begins. Obviously I could make it all up, but that feels a bit cheating. Some of the other replies on this thread might make some good starting points. Joe, if you're willing to explain why you chose the genders you did, or how they turned out in the games you've played, that would be valuable


    *The character is of a gender that the character is not comfortable with is a different story. I'd love to see that happen in one of my games.
  • possible connotations that come to mind:

    *Monast = monastery = monk/nun
    *Tinder is a word that means little sticks that you burn. So is faggot.
    *Tinder could also be a shortened form of Transgender. Which isn't much help, because "Transgender" isn't a gender, and people in rookvale seem to change genders freely so it's also not likely to be a useful description for a specific set of people.
    *Father and Lady both correspond to our standard gender binary. They both also connote a certain level of maturity.
    *Jack is also strongly male-aligned, at least to me. See for example: Jack and Jill, Jackass.
    *Mug is the one that I've got nothing for. Drinking Vessel, Face, Robbery. None of them seem to relate to traits that I'd connect to gender.
  • @arscott: Surely all your players will have to play characters of a different gender to their own, assuming they are male or female? The point, as I understand it anyway, is not that you get to play a "male" lady or a "female" mug, but that you are a lady or mug.

    On the other hand, the Rookvale rules (as far as I can tell), is completely silent when it comes to sex and sexuality. If that's important to you, then maybe you should discuss that with your group first. Rookvale is a fantasy world, so it could be there are two sexes or it could be everyone is a hermaphrodite; or there could be some completely different biology going on. I would have thought that any of these options are fine. The only thing the rules state is that gender itself is fluid and that characters can change gender throughout the game.

    The question is though, do you need to bring sex or sexuality into the game? Either answer is fine, but I don't think you should assume that really needs to be nailed down. This isn't Monsterhearts; there are no sex moves.

    It's something you need to discuss with your group before, during and after the game. It's a different frame of reference that is a major aspect of the game. It's worth chewing over because, frankly, it's interesting. It certainly isn't a game you can just throw down at the table and get on with it without ensuring everyone is on the same page first.

  • I guess what I'm really looking for is something that I as GM can say is true of various genders when the game begins. Obviously I could make it all up, but that feels a bit cheating.
    I'm not sure there's a lot I can say that's true about masculinity and femininity that doesn't feel like I'm cheating.

    Gender is already "made up" inasmuch as it "makes us up." I'd recommend letting the players that pick those genders define it, inasmuch as they might define what it means to be a Paladin or Selkie in other games.

    Sometimes it's going to be descriptive, other times prescriptive. The not-having-codified-gender-essentials-mapped-out-for-you-already might be part of the point of the game. That awkwardness, that trepidation, not on the part of the character but of the player.

    Joe's trying to convey the feeling of being queer, not in any meta-sense, but in actually feeling that way.

    And, let me tell you, it's not always comfortable.
  • Orlando, I think that you've kind of hit on what makes me so uncomfortable about gender as presented in this game. You say that gender is already "made up". On some level, it's true, but at the same time, I think that's really trivializing gender-as-experienced.

    I don't feel super-comfortable defining what it means to be a tinder, whether as player or GM, because I am not a tinder and I feel like saying what it means to be a tinder is patronizing and disrespectful towards tinders (who admittedly don't exist), and also maybe a little bit patronizing and disrespectful towards all genderqueer individuals.

    Part of it, I think, is that it's only in the past few years that I've been involved in games where the setting is created collaboratively through play rather than created whole cloth by game designer or GM. In discovering-through-play what it means to be a monast or a jack or a mug, I feel like I'm in a space where I don't really have permission to be.
  • Bottom line: you don't have to worry about offending fictional people (and why is this a factor for the tinder gender but not elves or dragonnewts?), and in terms of offending gender queer people, you are being given explicit permission by at least one, @mcdaldno, to have a go.

    It is only a game after all, a relatively safe space to explore these issues. In the long term, I suspect that playing will help you understand gender issues, and thus be in the interests of gender queer people, far more than not doing so for fear of getting it wrong.
  • Joe's right to make this kind of game because, and I don't want to depress everybody, but while we might think we're making headway with these kinds of issues in Europe and North America, in the world in general there's clearly still a long way to go.
  • I don't feel super-comfortable defining what it means to be a tinder, whether as player or GM, because I am not a tinder and I feel like saying what it means to be a tinder is patronizing and disrespectful towards tinders (who admittedly don't exist), and also maybe a little bit patronizing and disrespectful towards all genderqueer individuals.
    arscott,

    Thanks for continuing to think about this. Those concerns are really valid.

    Semajmaharg is right - there's no such thing as a tinder and you don't need to worry about offending fictional characters. But at the same time, you're on to something - games are a training ground for the way we look at the world, and it's important to not be patronizing and disrespectful in the stories we tell (because those stories will inform our worldview moving forward).

    So, let's explore what those six genders might be like, a little bit -
    possible connotations that come to mind:

    *Monast = monastery = monk/nun
    *Tinder is a word that means little sticks that you burn. So is faggot.
    *Tinder could also be a shortened form of Transgender. Which isn't much help, because "Transgender" isn't a gender, and people in rookvale seem to change genders freely so it's also not likely to be a useful description for a specific set of people.
    *Father and Lady both correspond to our standard gender binary. They both also connote a certain level of maturity.
    *Jack is also strongly male-aligned, at least to me. See for example: Jack and Jill, Jackass.
    *Mug is the one that I've got nothing for. Drinking Vessel, Face, Robbery. None of them seem to relate to traits that I'd connect to gender.
    Monast was indeed inspired by the words monastery and monastic. Their special power is all about recovering dice and maintaining their Charge even when there is failure. So I'm imagining Monasts as being reliable and non-reactive. Monasts are the lovers who are there for you when you need them.

    Tinder is a type of fire-starter. So maybe tinders are passionate, impulsive, reactive. There's a picture of a tinder in the book, on page 4 (Jesse, the example PC). There's two figures behind the tinder, and my guess might be that they're a lady (in scarlet) and a monast (in white). The tinder special power is all about power and lashing out, or alternately you could look at it as being all about gaining momentum (when a tinder is up, they're up).

    You suggest that Father and Lady both correspond to a standard gender binary. I think that's fair, but I want to point out that Father/Lady aren't parallel. In our world: Father is the intersection of masculine traits and parenthood, whereas Lady is the intersection of feminine traits and being upper class. In Rookvale: that may well be true, but "masculine" and "feminine" aren't words they'd even have, so they'd describe it differently.

    Fathers have a special power that's all about being protective. When someone else gets hit, or you intervene and take the hit for them, you get a boost toward avenging that hit. Fathers sound loyal and protective and maybe also controlling of those around them.

    Ladies have a power that's all about inspiring those around them. Ladies tend to rule over Rookvale. Ladies sound like born leaders, inspiring people. Lady also carries strong connotations of high status and high society for me. I'm imagining that when a lady strolls into battle, they look composed. When a lady climbs into bed with someone, they're assertive but attentive.

    Jack being "strongly male-aligned" isn't an important observation, because "male" isn't really a thing in Rookvale. Jacks have a special power that's about helping their friends and contributing to Big Epic Achievements. In my mind Jacks are attentive and helpful and born followers, but also people who crave adventure and excitement. If a jack was told "this might be dangerous," I imagine that a big smile would start to creep across their face.

    Mug is an old slang word meaning "face," and for me it connotes a grizzled butch face. I envisioned Mugs being tough folk who're rough around the edges. Many mugs would be proud of their scars. Some of the mugs who got pregnant would view their pregnancy as a triumph of blood and endurance, a battle against their own limits.

    ***

    More important than any specific shared traits, it's important to have characters feel like individuals. So when you introduce tinders, don't make them all the same. Make them recognizably tinder, sure, but make them all individuals with their own personal eccentricities and oddities.

    If it's helpful to consider media characters, here are some on-the-fly breakdowns of popular characters and what Rookvale gender I imagine them having -

    Harry Potter - lady
    Hermoine Granger - monast
    Ron Weasley - jack

    Batman - father
    Robin - jack
    Catwoman - tinder

    Luke Skywalker - monast or jack
    Princess Leia - lady
    Han Solo - mug
    Chewbacca - mug or father

    ***

    So, those are some non-canon extrapolations about what the genders might be like. When you put out the gender cards, you could say that stuff. If folks ask more questions about the genders, you could just shrug and forward the question to someone else in the group. If your players don't like that style of free-wheeling world-building, then you're welcome to instead make up whatever answers you come up with. Your answers will be Totally Right.
  • On the other hand, the Rookvale rules (as far as I can tell), is completely silent when it comes to sex and sexuality. If that's important to you, then maybe you should discuss that with your group first. Rookvale is a fantasy world, so it could be there are two sexes or it could be everyone is a hermaphrodite; or there could be some completely different biology going on. I would have thought that any of these options are fine. The only thing the rules state is that gender itself is fluid and that characters can change gender throughout the game.

    The question is though, do you need to bring sex or sexuality into the game? Either answer is fine, but I don't think you should assume that really needs to be nailed down. This isn't Monsterhearts; there are no sex moves.
    I was thinking about this earlier, and came up with the answer:

    two or more people have sex. sometimes, one or more people who had sex get pregnant. thirty-six weeks later, give or take, barring disaster, the pregnant people go through labor and give birth to one or more babies per pregnancy. depending on the culture, babies are or are not assigned a gender at birth, or shortly thereafter.

    asking about or discussing the physical mechanics of the sexual act ranges from rude to taboo, again depending on the regional culture. inquiring minds are, not always rudely, directed to a nearby barnyard or festhall.
  • edited September 2013
    (BUT WHERE DO BABIES COME FROM?

    - around the middle.)
  • Cool. Thank you for replying, Joe, and thanks to everyone else for contributing to this thread.
  • possible connotations that come to mind:

    *Jack is also strongly male-aligned, at least to me. See for example: Jack and Jill, Jackass.
    From an Aussie perspective, we also have "Jackaroos" and "Jillaroos" which vaguely translate as "cowboys" and "cowgirls". This is related to (and in addition to) the Jack and Jill remnant terminology from our English past. So the Jack is a very male oriented piece of terminology in these parts.

    Of course "to get the Jack", also means to get royally screwed. Make of that what you will.
  • thirty-six weeks later, give or take, barring disaster, the pregnant people go through labor and give birth to one or more babies per pregnancy.
    Actually, 40 weeks, give or take (38-42). Assuming we're talking about Earth people or their fictional analogs. =)

  • whatever I know nothing about bodies I am made entirely of text and without fingers I can't google and shut up you're not my real dad

    (thanks)
  • A friend on twitter pointed out that answering "What are tinders/etc like?" was perhaps the wrong tact, because genders aren't monolithic identity types. The better question to "What social roles and practices are expected of tinders? How do they fit into society?"

    Yeah. If I were going to make up a bunch of stuff about some fictional genders, that would have been the better set of questions to address. Stumbling and learning!
  • Another interesting question would be: what are the power dynamics between genders, based on common expectations? I mean that as a question to be answered through play, of course.
  • I was thinking the same thing Joe. Even if society prescribes six different genders for everyone to fit into, not everyone is going to fit perfectly into those roles. Maybe Ladies are expected to be physically strong, and it's shameful to see a lady get beat in a fight by a monast, but not by a tinder, and a lady should never fight a father, while a fight with a jack could go either way. How do people react when they see a Mug wearing makeup, when Mugs are supposed to be rough? Probably confused, maybe upset. How people deal with trying to fit into those expectations, and how they feel empowered or oppressed by them, is the most interesting part to me.

    Oh, I almost forgot the most important question: what are their pronouns?
  • Oh, I almost forgot the most important question: what are their pronouns?
    Good question. I refer to the duchesses and Grand Duchess with "she," but don't specify a pronoun for the six genders. You can designate them he/she as you see fit, or use they, or create a bunch of weird pronouns (lee, fee, ti, mug, mo, and jae?). Do whatever fits and makes sense for your group.
  • I think if a PC asked me and I were running that I'd probably say "Well, 'he' or 'she' is all about biological sex, which nobody really cares about except for that one weird archaic linguistic quirk with the pronouns. Gender is more something you... well, it's not really a choice, you just realize what gender you are somewhere around puberty. Sometimes earlier, sometimes later. And your choices of, like, what you're likely to wear and who you dig are way more into gender presentation than biological sexes. Like spikes are to Mugs in Rookvale as dresses are to women in our reality."

    And then I would progress with further impromptu minor worldbuilding details until somebody stopped me and reminded me that we should get back to fighting giant flaming mountain-demons.
  • Shit that's just so good. It's nice to imagine how playexperience could change people's understanding of gender smoothly. Okay it's just changed mine thru pondering. Somehow I feel it's totally fun (I only got scared by the Lash of Submission :D). I even decided that next time I'm going to socalize I will try to guess who is a Mug and how do I actually behave!

    This is for Hungarians (we have no special pronouns, everybody is 'ő'): Lady - Hölgy, Monast - Zátony, Jack - Bubi, Mug - Filkó, Father - Atya, Tinder - Kanóc. After choosing gender I would ask the players to read it's power and say what does that mean to them/their character!

    The only thing I could not get: Triage. I mean I looked up the word but still... what does that mean in the skill list?
    Oh and another problem: translating the title. Rook?
  • A rook is a type of bird, from the corvidae family. A bit like a crow. They come in parliaments, though, as opposed to murders. Neil Gaiman wrote an issue of Sandman about them.

    A rook is also another word for the castle piece in chess.
  • A rook is a type of bird, from the corvidae family. A bit like a crow. They come in parliaments, though, as opposed to murders. Neil Gaiman wrote an issue of Sandman about them.

    A rook is also another word for the castle piece in chess.
    Yeah, that's my problem, man!

  • Just leave it as is, then (which is what, rukvölgy? völgyruk?). It's not like Rookvale means much in English unless you really think about it, anyway.
  • The only thing I could not get: Triage. I mean I looked up the word but still... what does that mean in the skill list? Oh and another problem: translating the title. Rook?
    Well, one dictionary definition of triage goes: (in medical use) the assignment of degrees of urgency to wounds or illnesses to decide the order of treatment of a large number of patients or casualties.

    I was intending it to mean: assessing wounds, doing field medicine, getting people to safety, tourniquetting, and also making tactical decisions about how to keep folks safe. But mostly just field medicine.
  • Thanks and thanks, guys. I would not translate the name of duchies but Rookvale has a meaning so I think it deserves translation. Rukvölgy sounds great!
  • Hey, @Mcdaldno, we will try out Rookvale this weekend!

    Binding demons is an achievement. Summoning and controlling are also achievements, right?
    So you should use and check a skill for it? Or?
  • Hey @hamnacb,

    When you roll for an Achievement, you roll a Skill plus 0-6 Strike dice. Achievements are described on page 10. There is also a summary card dedicated to Achievements.

    Binding a demon is an Achievement with a difficulty equal to its current Hubris + current Wounds + current Defense. Summoning a demon is an Achievement with a difficulty equal to its full Defense. Commanding a demon is an Achievement with a difficulty equal to its current Hubris (which starts at 0 after a summoning). Each time you successfully command a demon, its Hubris goes up by 2. This is all described on page 13.

    A demon can be commanded once per round. If at the end of the round it hasn't been commanded, it does a Maneuver with its best skill and maximum possible number of Action dice.
  • I would probably just use the english names in play but if I had to go for a german translation I would go with.
    Lady = Dame (Which means lady as the title but is also used for queens, in the playing card)
    Father = Vater (1:1 translation)
    Monast = Monast (With a slightly different pronounciation probably, but a monastic lifestyle is called "monastisch" in German, so that still works)
    Tinder = Zunder (same root word again and also meaning something that can accelerate a fire as well as burst into flames easily)
    Jack = Bube (The playing card is called a Bube and it has a youthful connotation as well and a knave could be called a Spitzbube, so I think it comes close)
    Mug = Fratze (This one is not easy. A Fratze is a not very attractive face and if you are mugging as in pulling grimaces that would be associated with the word Fratze too. It does not get the old timey toughness and is a bit into the grotesque, but the best word i came up with.)
  • I know that every group should find it's own answers... but could a player evolve her bounded demons?
  • I know that every group should find it's own answers... but could a player evolve her bounded demons?
    Hamnacb,

    That's actually something I totally forgot to write into the rules! It seems like it'd be impossible to make such a silly omission, but I did. I think that you could introduce an Achievement with a difficulty equal to the demon's full Hubris stat plus current Defense to evolve it during battle, and/or allow a player to make a Demon Evolution roll as the mechanical effect of their Character Scene.
  • Mug = Fratze (This one is not easy. A Fratze is a not very attractive face and if you are mugging as in pulling grimaces that would be associated with the word Fratze too. It does not get the old timey toughness and is a bit into the grotesque, but the best word i came up with.)
    Mug is an odd one, in the UK a 'Mug' is an idiot, specifically, an easy mark, someone who a Con man might prey on. You'd never refer to someone as 'a mug' in a positive way. Most likely to be used in conversation as 'do you take me for a mug?' or 'are you making a mug out of me?' by someone who felt they were being taken advantage of, or treated as stupid...
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