Favorite Mythender moments

edited June 2009 in Actual Play
On the stuff to watch thread, John posted up the new Mythender character sheet, and Andy implied that he wanted to learn more. Also, at Camp Nerdly, when I was telling folks about past Mythender exploits, John asked me why I wasn't talking about it somewhere.

I gave him a lame excuse: "I'm all weird about self-promotion." I was rightly chastised for that attitude. So, fuck it, here are some of my favorite moments in the last year-and-a-half of playing this game. (This is, by no means, an exhaustive list of awesome. If you're one of the 49 people who have played Mythender, please share your moments!)


First, there's the moment in that post, when Mike's character, Rashid al-Jabbar, nearly both died & became a Myth. That was some high drama after an exciting fight.

My friend Jeremy Tidwell goes pretty fucking gonzo in his play, and playing Mythender is like unchaining him and telling him to sic a burglar.

At the end of our last adventure, he and Mike's character (Rashid al-Jabbar from the link above) were fighting a renegade Mythender who was looking to bring the word of Allah to giants. They were not going to let that stand. For Jeremy's second action in that fight, well, here's how best I can remember his phrasing:

"Okay, I'm on the horse. I slump to the side and ride low, using my [Cunning of a world weary warlord]. I ride around him wide, flanking. Then the horse speeds up, and I jump off, plant my feet into the ground, bringing the horse up and SWINGING IT INTO THE DUDE. As the horse connects, it kicks him in the face!"

My friend Jeremy, playing a 12 year old French girl inspired by Joan d'Arc, beat a dude with a horse.

Beat a dude with a horse.

I think after that the horse got thrown into the chasm. I guess its usefulness was done. I was hoping he'd say the horse lived, cuz, hey, badass horse.

One of my favorite characters was created by Brendan Adkins at GPNW II. He made a kid who was the sole survivor of one of the Children's Crusades. He went to Mythic Norden in order to make this and all land pure for God's children. He wielded a giant hammer, and was so touched by purity that his feet never touched earth -- it was too impure for him.

The part that made this badass -- this Mythender, this badass font of purity with his hammer of god -- was six fucking years old.

Just imagine playing someone who takes a look at this child and know, without a doubt, that this hero of six years has seen more horror and hell that whatever NPC your playing has, and knows that this kid, if he so wishes, can end your village with a thought.

I love playing NPCs in Mythender, because I love highlighting the raw power by playing people completely scared of them. I wish I got to play an NPC opposite of Brendan's character in our game, because, hey, uncompromising, battle-scarred, all-powerful six year old.

This one I'm about to share has been a pivotal moment in Mythender's creation. At GPNW II (same game as above), Joe McDonald was playing a Mythender who won a gold violin in a contest against the Metatron. He's fighting a dragon and the earth itself (represented by a sentient mountain). In the previous turn, the mountain harmed & encased Joe's character.

At the point, Joe says "Okay, my origin story isn't done...but it will be next turn." His turn comes around, and I ask him "What's your action?"

"I die and am reborn."

I swear, folks, the look on my face must have been priceless. Someone finally pushed my game to it's narrative limit, and I understood what I did to Paul's playtest in the previous GPNW when I said in our Penny game "Yes, and I haven't had a day off in 300 years."

I thought for a moment and said, "I don't think I can tell you no. But that's totally grandstanding." He only had three Thunder dice, but he did it, and gained enough Lightning to harm the earth back. Joe's character died and was reborn...and that HURT his foe.

Dying and being reborn...as a combat action. That's the example I keep coming back to when I say "Seriously, guys, as long as you can justify it and everyone else at the table is cool, anything can harm your opponent."


That's what I have right now. If you have any questions about how anything got handled or whatever, feel free to ask. I'll probably add some others when I have time later. Also, share your moments if you have them!

Comments

  • edited June 2009
    Posted By: Ryan Macklin
    At the point, Joe says "Okay, my origin story isn't done...but it will be next turn." His turn comes around, and I ask him "What's your action?"

    "I die and am reborn."

    [...]

    I thought for a moment and said, "I don't think I can tell you no. But that's totally grandstanding." He only had three Thunder dice, but he did it, and gained enough Lightning to harm the earth back. Joe's character died and was reborn...and that HURT his foe.

    Dying and being reborn...as a combat action.
    That was so cool. Seriously, it was one of my favourite moments that I've ever been responsible for.

    I was encased in a clay coffin, buried alive. I die. Suddenly, a shaft of light falls upon me from above.
    I break through the clay, raised into the sky by some invisble force.
    Cough. Cough. Sputter clay across the dragon and the mountain.
    Begin breathing again.
    For the first time, instead of being angry at my God (I was a reluctant and spiteful hero), I'm angry at my enemies.
    And I reach down for my violin...
  • *squeee*!

    This needs to come out soon!
  • I played a pirate who was drowned by her own crew after she was sacrificed to the god of the ocean in hope they would reach shore. Some games have beliefs or goals. In Mythender you have impossible drives. Yup, impossible. I swore to rid the earth of all oceans.

    My weapons? I can literally take the water from you. I’ve enslaved my former crew who now drag my ship around by land since I refuse to sail again. And as I grow in myth I become less mortal. My tell tale was that there is an anchor embedded inside me connected to a chain dragging across the land infinitely back to the exact location where I drowned in the middle of the ocean.

    My favorite moment was when I wanted to become more mortal. I told a farmer who just lost his family that he was my father now and to tell me the bedtime stories he used to tell his children.
  • Posted By: spookyfanboyThis needs to come out soon!
    The unfortunate thing is that it'll be later than people want. As the project manager & one of the writers on The Dresden Files RPG, that takes priority -- people have been wanting that for longer.

    But rest assured, I am working on this concurrently, when I feel like I can get away with it. :) And having con games & a home game of it forces me to continually do that.
  • Posted By: jenskot
    My favorite moment was when I wanted to become more mortal. I told a farmer who just lost his family that he was my father now and to tell me the bedtime stories he used to tell his children.
    I keep telling people about that moment. You were all like "NO! I'm your daughter now!" and "I won't help you save your children. For what I have planned for this work, it's better this way."

    You were fucking scary. Scary awesome!
  • Posted By: jenskot I swore to rid the earth of all oceans.
    [...]
    there is an anchor embedded inside me connected to a chain dragging across the land infinitely back to the exact location where I drowned in the middle of the ocean.

    There is a guitar solo raging inside of each of those sentences.
    Seriously, that is really cool and beautiful and intense... and strikingly not gonzo, considering the scope of power inherent in this game.
  • edited June 2009
    I totally impaled a dragon by falling on him at terminal velocity with my sword pointed down.

    I don't even remember how I got up there. The dragon threw me, maybe? But yeah, terminal velocity crusader strike.
  • edited June 2009
    I recall that -- in fact, I think that's from the very first convention playtest. "Terminal velocity impaling," and your character walked away from it like it wasn't even a thing.

    Ogre Whiteside had a similar moment in the other GPNW II playtest (which Albert was also in), where everyone was flung into the air, and as I was talking about them landing, Ogre said something to the effect of "fuck you, I'm still in the air falling." Back then, I was framing everything as comic book panels rather than pure narration, so I could totally visualize him talking about how he's screaming in 72 point scripty font "DIE!!!", one of those vertical 1/3 page panels with his face screaming for murder as he decends from the heavens, lance-first.

    Another moment I use to illustrate the versatility of "what is 'harming'": At GenCon last year, Fred really wanted to end Cthulhu. So, that's what he did. One of his Weapons (then called Traits -- boring as fuck term for them) was "Everyone loves me." He attacked Cthulhu with it.

    "What do you do with that?" I asked.

    He grinned evilly, as one can expect from Fred when you play with him. "I stand there. Cthulhu looks at me. He feels."

    I just look at him. Not a look of confusion, or of disapproval. Just one of "woah."

    He follows up. "That harms him, right?" (Harming occurs when you attack a foe's will or ability to fight, or will or ability to live. This certainly fit. I'm pretty sure if I said it didn't, the gorup would have harmed me.)

    "Yes, Fred. That's harm." I picked up Cthulhu's Thunder dice & rolled. While it didn't take him out of the fight, it certainly contributed to the one-two punch that would shortly thereafter. Still, when Fred says "I ended Cthulhu...with Love," it's as straightforward as that.
  • So those examples are epic and all. But they leave me wondering ...

    Do you do anything except beating up gods and scaring the shit out of villagers in this game? Do you have any examples of that?
  • Posted By: Simon_PetterssonSo those examples are epic and all. But they leave me wondering ...

    Do you do anything except beating up gods and scaring the shit out of villagers in this game? Do you have any examples of that?
    I'd like to see examples of these Mythenders tangling with regular mortals, if only because they're driven people, and I can only imagine them snapping over the harsh and brutal times that were the Dark Ages. So, how are those handled? Is it like 3:16, where each roll is how many people killed?
  • edited June 2009
    Posted By: Simon_PetterssonDo you do anything except beating up gods and scaring the shit out of villagers in this game? Do you have any examples of that?
    In the con game, it's pretty much that. That's what people focus on the first time playing Mythender. This is a mode of play I call "Speed Metal Mythender" -- where the rules better support the "I just want to end gods and be badass" mode of play.

    In my home campaign, we spend a lot of downtime reflecting on being this sort of person, in a mode of play I call (for lack of a better term at the moment, but fits the music motif) "Emo Shoegaze Mythender" -- where the rules encourage reflection & exploration of mortality.

    In both cases, NPCs always feel a dramatic emotion towards Mythenders. It's in their nature as nigh-godlike beings to make mortals feel uneasy -- some love & devote themselves unquestioningly, others hate or fear. In some ways, it's like being a mega-celebrity. They sometimes just want to be a regular person, and yet people won't let them because of how they react.

    In the last adventure in my home campaign:

    * Rashid al-Jabbar spoke at length with a man he freed from a giant fortress. They talked about the nature of Allah and how he could bring peace to these people. It was a tender moment where Rashid was trying to help this village not by killing myths (though, that would come later), but by just trying to bring some very human peace to these people. We got to call back to this scene in the adventure's denouement when Rashid gave the man a giant Koran, previously used by the renegade Mythender they fought as a shield.

    * Beatrice (Jeremy's 12-year-old girl "I beat a dude with a horse" character) just participated in ending a trio of witches in the forest, when a little girl her age came to the hut. She said "I had to come, it was my turn," and Beatrice -- at this point floating off the ground, with wings and a halo -- told her it would be okay, and walked with her back home. The girl was rightly scared, since she was talking with a freakin' angel who just slaughtered the witches that her village feared since as long as anyone can remember, but Beatrice kept patient and just tried to talk with her like one little girl to another. They had this touching moment when Beatrice lamented not getting to play with dolls when she was young, and the girl gave her the doll she was holding. At that moment, the wings & halo faded from Beatrice as she floated to the ground.

    These scenes are important, because Mythenders push themselves when fighting myths, push themselves to the brink of becoming myths themselves. In order to edge back from that, they have to spent time trying to be a regular mortal...around people who can't help but not treat them as proto-gods.

    For me, that's the major fun of the campaign. One hour, you have shouting and wholesale slaughter of a host of trolls. The next, you're trying to play a game with some of the townsfolk in order to unwind and just enjoy life -- and hope that they'll pretend they don't see the horns coming out of your head.

    But, those are two slightly different games, which is why I have two modes of play. I suspect people will play their first game Speed Metal -- it's a good way to learn the rules and see what that game's about on its surface. That's why I'll only run that at cons (since, you know, time constraints). Emo Shoegaze is where it's fucking at, though.
  • Posted By: spookyfanboyI'd like to see examples of these Mythenders tangling with regular mortals, if only because they're driven people, and I can only imagine them snapping over the harsh and brutal times that were the Dark Ages. So, how are those handled? Is it like 3:16, where each roll is how many people killed?
    When it comes to mortals, well, I talked about this a bit when Josh Roby & I talked about designing for epic games:
    Master Plan episodes 45 and 46

    In short, there is no mortal power that can stop a Mythender from killing someone. They say it, it happens. (If there's a Mythic power backing them, that's a different story -- but then it's also immediately revealed.)

    In the last con game, John's character killed at least a hundred people as an afterthought. He destroyed a castle by causing a giant ocean wave to crush into it. But, that's pretty big-scale.

    In an early, early playtest, before I knew how NPCs should react to Mythenders, I had one give a Mythender lip. Jeremy, playing a different character then, turned to me and said "Uh, Ryan, I can just kill him, right? No roll or anything?"

    "Yep. He's pure mortal."

    "Does he know that?"

    I was taken aback by that, and realized that, frankly, they should know that a Mythender is like a Myth, in that both can snuff a mortal life out without exerting effort. The only thing that can stop them is, frankly, another mythic force...including other Mythenders.

    If the group says "Fuck this, we burn the town," they do. I mean, we might have to talk about how that might fuck with the tone of what we're going for -- but that's an "adults talking about a game suddenly not being fun" thing, not a "the GM said we can't for X reason we need to overcome" thing.

    This gets into some neat fights, where three Mythenders fight an army backed by a mythic being. Three versus a thousand. With those sorts of numbers, the rules state an action can involve killing off a dozen nameless characters as just part of the simple narration prior to narrating the effect. No die roll to see how many killed or anything like that, since the game isn't about keeping score.
  • Man I want this game.......
  • This game was one of the highlights of Nerdly for me.

    I remember John asking (no, TELLING) the farmer to read him a bedtime story, then explaining to the farmer that raising his children from the dead was pointless, as he planned to destroy the world soon. Very, very cool.

    As for moments of personal glory, Chad was kind enough to give me a chance to grandstand at the very end and I was able to land the killing blow on the Midgard Serpent. That's when the Last Emperor of Rome (on a chain), was shoved into the poisoned belly of the beast and ordered to go to the Serpent's heart, and rend it to pieces. The Last Emperor wrapped that chain around every goddamned organ the serpent had in it's disgusting guts, then tore into it's heart with his teeth. As the serpent went into convulsions, the chain tightened on it's guts and tore it apart from the inside out.

    Every now and then I'll be driving home from work and remember that game, which is when I do a fist-pump and mutter something like "FUCK YEAH" to myself. Good times.
  • edited June 2009
    So what's so bad about becoming a myth, aside from making you a target for other Mythenders (I mean, seems like you're going to get in the way of other Mythenders already, if you want to destroy all the oceans and I'm the Crimson Corsair, the world's most dreadest pirate lord)? Is that just one of the game's assumptions, that gods and myths are inherently bad, evangelical atheism-style?
  • edited June 2009
    Posted By: Jonathan WaltonSo what's so bad about becoming a myth, aside from making you a target for other Mythenders
    All the good you want to do in the world is instead inverted.

    Were you trying to end the very concept of treachery (as one character was working on in my home game)? When you become a myth, you instead become a being of treachery and create more of it in the world.

    It's corruption on a large scale, affecting personal and the world at the same time. It's a bit inspired, I guess, by Falling in In Nomine (though I don't know how much I realized that until I just typed it).

    And yes, that is one of the assumptions, that gods & myths are enslavers of mortals. But I have no problem with people playing with that idea and making Mythender a little grey -- hell, I done that a bit myself, in some earlier games.

    All said, in a con game, people push themselves towards becoming myths all the time. I have no problem with that -- it's gonzo shout-y play.
  • Posted By: Jonathan WaltonIs that just one of the game's assumptions, that gods and myths are inherently bad, evangelical atheism-style?
    Also, more than a few people have gone the "pagan gods and myths are inherently bad, evangelical Christian-style" route. The game has some roots in being an anti-Viking game, of European invaders coming in and changing the world to suit their ideas.

    You could totally play with that sense of fucked-up cultural imperialism and what it means to do that to people. Or you could just punch Odin in his eye. I'm good either way.
  • That actually reminds me: religion is the biggest deal in my home game. One character wants to convert everyone to Islam, and another believes that God spoke to her and told her to end the beasts in the North. Devout Muslim & devout Christian debating religion, often with terrified or thankful pagans caught in the crossfire.

    But, that's a religion-heavy game. Again, you could also just stab an ice troll in the face with its own rib. Whatever.
  • edited June 2009
    Cool, Ryan. It sounds like the post-deification stuff isn't strictly encoded into the mechanics but is more of a narrative endgame that the players engage in, describing what happens afterwards, yeah? If the latter, it seems like there could be a lot of flexibility there, such that the ending could be emergent from the events of play. I guess I was just worried that there was an inherent anti-superstition or anti-religion tone to the game, but it sounds like that's not actually the case, unless everyone in the game is a stereotypical absolutist about all of their beliefs, rather than just the one major change they're trying to make in the world.

    Your In Nomine comparison is interesting, because I grew up playing a bunch of that in middle school. So becoming a myth is like being a Word-bound angel and falling, such that you keep your Word but interpret it through a twisted lens (but, in Mythender, it's not a Word but your goal)? Interesting. So you could even interpret the cost of becoming a myth to actually be the cost of hubris, thinking you were good enough to slay myths, like the horrible deaths of Hercules or Joan of Arc before they were lifted into the heavens to become demigods and saints.
  • edited June 2009
    The fact that post-deification happens is, of course mechanical (or, I should say the fact that deification happens is), but the effects are narrative middle-ground that the players engage in, yeah. (I hesitate to call it "endgame" -- while it is for one character, it isn't inherently endgame for the campaign.)
    Posted By: Jonathan Waltonunless everyone in the game is a stereotypical absolutist about all of their beliefs
    I've seen this happen. It's easy for con play, of course. For campaign play, I actually think it can be neat to start in this character-space...because it doesn't stand the test of time. If the GM is doing his job, that absolutism is being challenged. Ending myth is metaphor as much as it is real, etc.

    You're spot on, regarding reading my IN comparison. (There's also a shitton of "This is what I wish playing a Solar Exalted was like" in the game. At least one person has told me they're looking forward to Mythender so they can use it for Exalted.) Hubris is one of the motifs of Mythender, that's for sure.

    Early on, I started thinking about historical monster-killers as Mythenders. St. George was my first -- and in the Mythender paradigm, he failed. He became a Myth. In a very anti-classic hero sense, your goal is almost "make change happen, but do not be remembered."

    Of course, this somewhat clashes with the "ZOMG THOR FACESTAB" that the game produces in short-form. Which is why I have two distinct modes of play. The clash is interesting in long-form.
  • Interesting hook. "What if Saint George had failed? Come and find out as a Mythender!"
  • Posted By: Ryan MacklinYou're spot on, regarding reading my IN comparison. (There's also a shitton of "This is what I wish playing a Solar Exalted was like" in the game. At least one person has told me they're looking forward to Mythender so they can use it for Exalted.) Hubris is one of the motifs of Mythender, that's for sure.
    Based on what I've seen and read, it's a frighteningly easy map from Mythender to Solar Exalted.

    Instead of Thunder and lightning Dice, you have Heat and Brilliance Dice.

    Instead of changing and looking more and more mythic, you have your Solar Anima getting larger and more obvious.

    Instead of slaying Gods, you conquer and subdue Cthulhoid faeries that mutate reality, masterminding sifu, elemental-based demigods, avatars of death and destruction, champions of corruption and mutation, and the occasional unruly deity.

    Instead of becoming Myth, you risk becoming filled with Hybris, and becoming a corrupt parody of yourself. To prevent this, you have to spend time being foolish and all-too-human in your own certain way. Once you "hit bottom" and let off all that steam, you're able to go out and do your thing again.

    Instead of having an impossible goal...well, you have an Impossible Destiny.

    Instead of mortals being basically non-challenging, mostly annoying scenery...well, that doesn't change.

    Instead of the end of Myth and all that entails, you have the dilemma of the Old West: You were the biggest, baddest outlaw, and you defended the community while being too big for the community to contain or accept. What happens to you when you've killed or subdued all the bad guys, and you're the biggest threat to the community? What do you do?
  • My character background from one of the much earlier drafts of the game:

    A raider from Norden killed my family.
    I will kill him, but a man does not live alone.
    That man has a chieftan,
    and that chieftan has a king
    and that king has a god.

    My drive was to kill my way through the heirarchy until I got my shot at killing Thor.
  • Posted By: spookyfanboyInstead of the end of Myth and all that entails, you have the dilemma of the Old West: You were the biggest, baddest outlaw, and you defended the community while being too big for the community to contain or accept. What happens to you when you've killed or subdued all the bad guys, and you're the biggest threat to the community? What do you do?
    I talked about that with respect to Mythender a bit ago on my blog: Mythender as a Western
  • Posted By: King TurnipMy character background from one of the much earlier drafts of the game:
    I'm also reminded of the character we made over lunch a couple months ago, where his Impossible Drive was to "Make first love last forever."
  • Posted By: spookyfanboyBased on what I've seen and read, it's a frighteningly easy map from Mythender to Solar Exalted.
    And instead of Weapons, you have Charms. Keeps the flavor of that, I think.

    There are a couple parts that would still need mapping, but I suspect it wouldn't be hard.
    Posted By: spookyfanboyInstead of mortals being basically non-challenging, mostly annoying scenery...well, that doesn't change.
    Well, the way I run it, mortals are pretty freakin' important. Just, the sort of important that doesn't rule out wholesale killin'. ;)
  • How far along is this game? Is it post-playtesting, pre-publication?
  • Posted By: ShoggothThat's when the Last Emperor of Rome (on a chain), was shoved into the poisoned belly of the beast and ordered to go to the Serpent's heart, and rend it to pieces. The Last Emperor wrapped that chain around every goddamned organ the serpent had in it's disgusting guts, then tore into it's heart with his teeth. As the serpent went into convulsions, the chain tightened on it's guts and tore it apart from the inside out.
    Fucking A. That was SO awesome.
  • Posted By: Ryan MacklinAll said, in a con game, people push themselves towards becoming myths all the time. I have no problem with that -- it's gonzo shout-y play.
    We really want to win before we essplode.
  • Posted By: Bret GillanHow far along is this game? Is it post-playtesting, pre-publication?
    Post-internal playtesting, mid-writing, pre-outside playtesting (a.k.a "Did I explain the game right?")
  • Ryan, I want the game now but I know how hard it is to produce these things. I'd rather you take the time you need to make it live up to your expectations. But if you ever need motivation, jump on here and ask us to motivate you. We have ways! Many, many ways!
  • Just a question: how do you determine character Gifts? Is there a list, or do you customize for the character? If so, are there guidelines for customizing Gifts?
  • Long-ass list of mechanical feats & upgrades. That's where the game gets a slight bit of tactical crunch, which I found promoted teamwork pretty well while also making characters feel more distinctive. (No slight to Fred & DRYH, since everyone knows I freaking love that game, but I wanted to make a game with the same tension vibe of DRYH without the inherent mechanical sameness of all characters.)

    No customizing - there's no fictional component to Gifts - I found it wasn't needed, given the way play was happening. (Plus, given the game's conceit, such narrative restriction would feel alien.)

    You get one to start, and one every time you progress your Mythic Fate. (And with you retreat from your Mythic Fate, you lose some.)
  • "My friend Jeremy, playing a 12 year old French girl inspired by Joan d'Arc, beat a dude with a horse."

    "He made a kid who was the sole survivor of one of the Children's Crusades. He went to Mythic Norden in order to make this and all land pure for God's children. He wielded a giant hammer, and was so touched by purity that his feet never touched earth -- it was too impure for him."

    "Dying and being reborn...as a combat action."

    I played a pirate who was drowned by her own crew after she was sacrificed to the god of the ocean in hope they would reach shore. [;..] I swore to rid the earth of all oceans.

    "I wanted to become more mortal. I told a farmer who just lost his family that he was my father now and to tell me the bedtime stories he used to tell his children."

    "I ended Cthulhu...with Love"

    "Beatrice lamented not getting to play with dolls when she was young, and the girl gave her the doll she was holding. At that moment, the wings & halo faded from Beatrice as she floated to the ground."

    "that is one of the assumptions, that gods & myths are enslavers of mortals"


    I just read all these posts again. I never had daydreams about a game since I was 12.

    You just sold another copy.
  • Posted By: KobayashiI just read all these posts again. I never had daydreams about a game since I was 12.

    You just sold another copy.
    This makes me want to work on it faster. (But, no, not at the expense of better.)

    Another moment: I ran a game at PaulCon (Paul Tevis' birthday festivities), and for the second time, a Mythender betrayed the others during the climatic fight. The first time it happened was last Dreamation, it was because one of the Mythenders wanted to talk with the Midgard Serpent about something important, and the others just wanted to end it. The adventure mattered to that character because she wanted to end lust, and she knew the Midgard Serpent knew man before lust took hold, so she wanted to talk and learn from it. The only way to do that was to defend the serpent from the others.

    She failed, and the serpent was ended. It was the saddest mythending I had witnessed, until PaulCon.

    An angel of the lord, imprisoned in a castle when the Mythenders arrived, was freed when the Midgard Serpent (notice a pattern in my con games?) appeared, to avenge the children the Mythenders slaughtered in the previous fight. The angel joined with the serpent, and was the primary Myth in the battle.

    The reason this adventure mattered to one of the PCs: the angel was the myth he fell in love with years ago.

    They fought, and the entire time he stared into her eyes to know where her heart stood. And even the son of Loki -- another Mythender who used Lies as a Mythic Weapon -- could not fool this Mythender (who wanted to end Heartbreak) into believing the angel did not love her.

    As the son of Loki aided him in their joined efforts against the angel, he switched sides and betrayed them...only to fail as the son of Loki defeated them both in a single blow.

    The angel he loved, that he grew to understand in the middle of their battle, was dead. He could not help but feel the heartbreak he sought to end.

    When Mythenders betray one another for love or for an ideal, it's a tragic story -- because no matter what, someone will be ended. They are growing to become a favorite story of mine.
  • I hope we'll see some of these "moments" as examples in the final text, they all convey very well what the game is about and are very inspiring for me as a GM.
  • I'm curious about this game. Are there mechanics for the part where you try to stay human? Do I say "I wanna have a Humanity Scene" and roll to decrease my Mythicness? Since it's inspired by Don't Rest Your Head, it sounds like it (since DRYH lets you spend Hope Coins to decrease your Exhaustion). In which case it's awesome.
  • edited June 2009
    Posted By: KobayashiI hope we'll see some of these "moments" as examples in the final text, they all convey very well what the game is about and are very inspiring for me as a GM.
    One of the issues I'm struggling with right now is how to present those in the text. I'm still a big self-conscious about my AP for my own game, and even writing it up like this feels a bit wankery. (But, knowing people actually want to read it has overcome that. Still, this isn't how I'd like to present it in the book.)
    Posted By: Simon_PetterssonI'm curious about this game. Are there mechanics for the part where you try to stay human? Do I say "I wanna have a Humanity Scene" and roll to decrease my Mythicness? Since it's inspired by Don't Rest Your Head, it sounds like it (since DRYH lets you spend Hope Coins to decrease your Exhaustion). In which case it's awesome.
    They're called "Mortality Moments," but yes, there are mechanics. Almost entirely in the social space, but that's still mechanics. You say you're having a Mortal Moment, and we play it out however the group likes to play it out -- I've seen some role-play interaction, others just describe what happens, the rules are agnostic about that. Moments are with NPC mortals, and the two questions asked of the group afterward:

    * Did it feel like the Mythender actually tried to connect with a mortal? (Even if he failed, it still counts if he tried)
    * Did it feel like the moment added to the story or adventure?

    Making explicit the idea that the group (not just the GM, but everyone) can regulate whatever they consider abuses to the rules -- from the perspective of a group's sensibilities, not mine. The guiding text I have noted down is focused on "play on the same wavelength" and not "play like how I play."

    (I talk a little bit about this on the latest episode of Master Plan: #49, Pacing Mechanics part 1, Refresh Scale)
  • Posted By: Ryan Macklin
    One of the issues I'm struggling with right now is how to present those in the text. I'm still a big self-conscious about my AP for my own game, and even writing it up like this feels a bit wankery. (But, knowing people actually want to read it has overcome that. Still, this isn't how I'd like to present it in the book.)
    Rigth now it seems like many of the short APs posted here work very well as exemples of specific aspect of play, a kind of "that's how it is played". For example, the "mortality moments rules" maybe crystal clear but the AP with Beatrice and the little girl just nails it down. So :

    _no it's not wanking it's sharing so thank you for that (and the other players that posted)
    _It's not that I only want to read it, I feel like it should be part of the rules because it helps me understand the game's themes and maybe it's rules. For example :
    Posted By: Ryan Macklin
    * Did it feel like the Mythender actually tried to connect with a mortal?
    The AP about Beatrice and "My favorite moment was when I wanted to become more mortal. I told a farmer who just lost his family that he was my father now and to tell me the bedtime stories he used to tell his children." just tell me what I should expect from the players and how I can explain it to them.

    So don't get too weird about this, this a great thread and I might have overlooked Mythender otherwise.
  • I've been following your discussion of Mythender on your Master Plan podcasts, particularly because I'm been interested in how you make it epic. Yet these APs are incredible. I failed to really grasp the awesome you were aiming for! Like for the most epic rollercoaster ride ever! Like for the game I've dreamed about with my best friends for the last decade or two. Thanks.
  • edited June 2009
    Alexandre,

    You have a good point. Consider it headed. The trick will be presentation -- I don't want it to just feel like a forum thread. (Conveniently, that's where good layout, art & editing will come in.)

    Oliver,

    Oh, man. The "epic" thing. Designing that alone was a rollercoaster! :) I have a lot of failed attempts to make "epic play" happen with early versions of this game. I should probably do an episode on how my early attempts at "Success or Success-but, no Failure" mechanics were complete garbage, as a case study of player psychology & reaction to GM-based stimuli. I have dropped every "small-scale" mechanic I've come up with, because they all took away from the unashamed awesome.

    It might be telling that I bought 300 to watch and rewatch while working on Mythender.

    Another moment, and this one is something I'll have to unpack for GMing advice:

    Rashid & Beatrice hate being worshiped. They know that mortals revere or fear (or both) Mythenders, but they actively wince at people acting as though they're gods. Makes sense, since they're devoutly religious.

    Naturally, as the GM, that's the button I press. I have had characters ask them if they're gods, and not understand the answer "no." I've had a king come off his throne and bow to them -- both of them demanded that the king stand and that it was they who should bow to him.

    It was recently that I realized: the real challenge to that type of Mythender isn't a battle with Thor, but convincing a family that they're just a normal person. Fighting monsters, while risky, is easier than talking with people.

    There's nothing mechanical about this, but it's the reason that, frankly, a girl beating a dude with a horse is interesting. It's juxtaposed with that same girl just wanting to play dolls with another, with her would-be friend not being able to get the image of the epic feat out of her head the entire time.

    While the mechanics are there, one thing I really have to meditate on is coming up with the various bits of advice like that for GMs. Naturally, that's proving difficult to get all that out of my head and onto paper -- which is good, because I like a challenge. (And given that you also have Mythenders that love the limelight and would basically bed every farmer's daughter in Mythic Norden, what to do with NPCs for that character.)
Sign In or Register to comment.