Give me your Camp Nerdly Blog Posts and Opinions

Consider this a virtual suggestion box. I apologize for the lack of anonymity.

Please link to your blog posts about Camp Nerdly (summarizing if you can). Also, if you just want to post or comment, please do so here.

Thanks!
«1

Comments

  • Here's my personal reflections on CN03.

    Big ups to the organizers. This was the first year I was just another dude, and it was a real pleasure to just do my chore and otherwise show up for great meals and so forth. I didn't realize how all the hard work the organizers do makes it trouble-free for everyone else. Thanks, guys! From my limited POV it was pretty flawless.
  • Camp Nerdly Summary

    I second Jason's Ups. This feels just as fun as a realBigger Con. My main worry was scheduling, but it worked out. I was very happy to see so many wives and girlfriends.

    Nicholas Marshall
  • I'd just like to thank everyone who pushed a broom, prepared food, or scrubbed a pot.

    Thank you!!!
  • I almost missed Camp Nerdly. I’m glad I didn’t!

    Camp Nerdly in 4 words: Quality time with quality people.

    My goal was to play new games with new people and distant friends. I won!

    - 1000 Blank White Cards

    A party game where you draw your own cards. Think Magic the Gathering except you invent your deck as you play. I’ve avoided playing before because it seemed like more work than fun. It wasn’t. It’s a great ice breaker and a game to consider playing at cons that is inclusive to stimulate socializing.

    - Spione: Story Now in Cold War Berlin

    Dave ran. That sold me alone. Simple game with lots of possibilities, strong color, easily supports a large group of players, quick resolution, almost zero prep, lots of fun.

    You tell the story of 2 spies in Berlin. My only disappointment was that the second immoral transgression was never revealed.

    It was a little difficult to track the simultaneous stories of 2 spies with mostly separate casts. We subconsciously started merging the cast to simplify things. But otherwise the game was smooth, dramatic, and had a satisfying ending. I loved flashpoints and how a spy has to remove a supporting character after each flashpoint once the immoral transgression is incorporated into the story. The use of card value and suit to determine the supporting character’s fate was clever.

    - Fiasco

    Loved character and situation creation. Using Jason’s rules I could play 20 games of Fiasco with 10 minutes of prep and each game would be completely different. Sold! I believe Jason felt that the game was a little flat. I enjoyed it. But I agree that it never shifted out of second gear except for the very end which was horrifying. It still repulses me! Just sad.

    Why didn’t it escalate? I think the suburban setting and the very realistic characters and situations kept it from attaining the level of drama of a movie. It was a very real game. Which is partly why the end was so sad. But I suspect, although satisfying, it wasn’t what Jason intended.

    I’m usually the person to smash things to the next level of insanity but I felt invested in the character’s normalcy and enjoyed the challenge of not taking things to the next level. But it could have used just 1 more level. I’m also uber conscious of stealing spotlight (especially in games where I’m playing a supporting character like this one) which sometimes makes me more reserved than normal.

    The other factor seems to be the twist. Half way through the game we introduce 2 elements that twist the game’s situation. I felt these elements weren’t fully taken advantage of or weren’t twists at all as they simply built on the path things were already headed in. I think this is where things could have but didn’t progress.

    The other issue might be that it was structured freeform minus the basic guidelines of even a system like improv. The same issue came up in Montsegur 1244. There wasn’t a system in place for Yes And… Building… No Blocking… nor was there a system to communicate intents. I could tell there were instances where someone wanted to go in a direction and their dancing partner didn’t quite follow their subtle lead in both games. Although Fiasco did have a way to communicate if the scene should end positively or negatively which helped.

    Edit: the fact that this was a con game with people who don’t play weekly together should also be taken into account. I suspect that with more familiar players, you need less structure to freeform and clear intents. These were also shorter games.

    (continued below)
  • - Montsegur 1244

    This game completely caught me off guard. It wasn’t what I expected. But it was very good. It’s like the mountain witch in that it is a built in scenario with rules except in this case the characters are provided and play can start almost instantly.

    It reminded me of the old Burning Wheel 10 player LARPish games. Luke had similar relationship maps and instead of using questions to aim at the other characters Luke would use Burning Wheel beliefs and instincts.

    It also reminded me of Grey Ranks and the Roach in that it provided a scene structure and arc as well as elements to incorporate into each scene that really made the setting and fiction come alive.

    It suffered a bit from some of the issues I described above in Fiasco but the character questions and story cards really helped focus and drive play.

    I played Cecille, a dying woman who is one of the town’s spiritual leaders. I planned on playing her as a warm and hopeful influence to contrast the invading forces. But after the first scene, another character said something which shocked me (talking about flirting with the outside invaders) that I in mid sentence I changed who Cecille was and made her a tyrannical and fanatical soul divorced from reality and concerns of the flesh. I ripped out one of my back teeth that was slowly rotting and gave it to the girl who wanted to flirt with the outsider as a sign that the flesh is temporary at best and focus should be paid to what is really important.

    The scene Jeff and Jason played together where Jeff tried to make a deal with his old friend who broke his leg to call off the invasion in exchange for one of his daughters was pure brilliance. Great performance! Stunning.

    Danielle also stole the show. No question.

    - MythEnder

    Ryan had to stop me from giving him money. And money is tight and he hasn’t even written the game yet!!!

    In Mythender you play the equivalent of a 30th level D&D character killing myths and gods before you are ended or fall to a fate worse than death… become a god yourself to be hunted by your fellow Mythenders.

    Imagine stabbing Odin in his good eye and telling him how much of a little punk he his.

    I played a pirate who was drowned by her own crew after she was sacrificed to the god of the ocean in hope they would reach shore.

    Some games have beliefs or goals. In Mythender you have impossible drives. Yup, impossible. I swore to rid the earth of all oceans. Yup.

    My weapons? I can literally take the water from you.

    I’ve enslaved my former crew who now drag my ship around by land since I refuse to sail again.

    And as I grow in myth I become less mortal. My tell tale was that there is an anchor embedded inside me connected to a chain dragging across the land infinitely back to the exact location where I drowned in the middle of the ocean.

    My favorite part was when I wanted to become more mortal. I told a farmer who just lost his family that he was my father now and to tell me the bedtime stories he used to tell his children… the ones that just drowned due to the serpent. Wow. WTF!

    When the GM says no to you… about anything… they write it down and give it a number. You can then attack it till the no becomes a yes.

    Ryan… write the game. Now… do it now!

    We also had plenty of amazing conversations about taking D&D 4E to the next level, marketing, graphic design, semiotics, convention marketing, and much more!

    My only regrets is that I couldn’t spend more time with people. Especially Mark who I had two chance to play with and it didn’t work out both times.

    I’m also very thankful to the organizers. Great job!

    I’ll be there next year!
  • Those are great summaries of the two games we played together, John.
  • I really should write a compare/contrast about Camp Nerdly & Nerdly Beach Party while it's fresh in my mind.

    Also, John, I fucking love you for writing that, man. \m/
    There's always one "holy shit, I didn't know we were going there" in every Mythender game. This time, you were that guy (in a wicked awesome way).
  • Your pictures are great, Rob.
  • My pictures - apparently I was photographing during the same Saturday afternoon time slot as Rob.
  • Posted By: Nathan H...also, no pratfalls, up hill, onto a chair.
    That was spectacular. You tore that chair up.
  • This was my first Camp Nerdly, so I have nothing else to compare it to, other than pro cons and small house cons. Camp Nerdly rocked. Seriously.

    Scheduling

    The only thing I wonder about is the event scheduling. Both of my events were full of awesome players and I always found something fantastic to play when I wanted, so I'm not complaining at all. Scheduling just seemed really disorganized.

    First there was online scheduling -- well, it was more interest registering. Some people I talked to said they checked the site once or twice early on and didn't go back to see what had been added. Because we kept the game list ordered alphabetically rather than by date added, people weren't sure what was new (unless they knew how to use the History tab, as I did).

    Then there was onsite sign-ups. The easel sign-up worked wonderfully, I think. At first, I was concerned that we were putting the sheets out for only one slot at a time. This, I think, turned out to be a feature, and not a bug, since people were less likely to sign up for events and not show up for them. I heard numerous suggestions for ways to make this sign-up process slightly better, but the process worked.

    My one major regret was that Frank asked me to reserve a spot for him in my D&D Metrocalypse game. Then he went off like a good soldier to clean the kitchen after lunch and lost his spot. I offered to shoehorn him back in when he got done but he declined, probably because the table was full. Frank, I apologize.

    Gaming

    The two games I ran went very well, thanks to the fine people who played in them. I was incredibly unprepared for these games, it turns out, and I hope it didn't show too badly. I apologize to my patient players.

    The games I played in were amazing. I tried some things I would normally pass up and enjoyed them greatly. I know now that I need to purchase Ticket to Ride. I also would love to play more of Eric's hacked Mechaton-cum-Gundam game, and I might hack it further to be a fantasy miniatures skirmish game. Despite problems mentioned elsewhere and bad kidney pain and frequent bathroom trips, I had fun playing How We Came to Live Here. Luckily, I was feeling better by the afternoon. I only wish I'd realized there was a bathroom in the Castle. The Jeepform Sampler was a lot of fun. I felt we struggled with some of the exercises, but the final improv "Forged Butter" play was pure comedy gold.

    Everything else

    The food was good. Thanks to everyone who shopped or cooked. Cooking for 50 is way different than cooking for 4, I know. You guys were amazing.

    The chore system worked, mostly. Thank you to everyone who completed chores. Bigger thank-yous to everyone who helped out with a chore they weren't assigned.

    I kinda got left for dead on cleanup after Friday snacks, since my Grime Assassin compatriots hadn't yet arrived. It wasn't a huge deal -- there wasn't a lot to clean up -- but it would have been three times quicker with help. Since it's hardly a secret who was assigned to Friday cleanup, I'm gonna call some folks out. Andrew Morris and Sean Leventhal: where were you guys? I know Andrew arrived late. If you knew you were going to arrive late, you should have swapped chores with someone. Especially after making some public comments about hating chores and offering to pay to get out them. It looks bad.

    With few exceptions, I felt everyone stepped up and made the experience great.

    The main thing I'd change is to leave a little more time after the big meals for people to clean up, or assign more cleaners to those chores. People shouldn't have to miss games because they are washing pots.

    Whoever brought the bicycle--thank you! It dawned on me that I hadn't actually ridden a bike in about 15 years, so I took the opportunity to fix that at Nerdly. A couple times I needed to zip back to my cabin or down to the parking lot, and the bike made the trip fast. Of course, I now have soreness in muscles I had forgotten existed. Fun!

    I am looking forward to next year!
  • I'm excited for D&D Metrocalypse. Adam, I'm part of a weekly 4E group (with Frank). If you want us to playtest D&D Metrocalypse for a session, let me know. If it is something that we could effectively test in 3 encounters... even better!

    To riff off of Adam's thoughts, I thought camp nerdly ran fairly smoothly. The only 2 things I would suggest:

    1. No wiki game signups. Everything happens on site and you can only sign up for one time slot at a time.

    2. I'm not sure about the logistics, but it felt we needed at least 10-20 more minutes between sessions to complete chores.

    That being said, I just remembered another part I loved. In the middle of Saturday, there were 2 time slot options. You could play two 2.5 hour games or one 5 hour game.I thought this was a great idea. At the next event I organize, I will try to do something similar.

    You guys rock,
    John
  • See, I totally loved the wiki sign-ups. I didn't want to prep Metrocalypse if no one was going to be interested. It took hours and hours to make those characters and research Oxford history to build that scenario. If you treat the wiki sign-ups as interest rather than guarantee of a slot, it works.

    John, I may have some new Metrocalypse creatures to test out at some point. I can toss together a series of three linked encounters for you to play through. With pre-gens, if you want, but I'd rather see people use my guidelines to create their own characters. I'll definitely tap you guys as readers/playtesters when I have a Metrocalypse product in a draft form. Right now, it's just notes and my own campaign stuff.
  • Hey Adam, yeah, kitchen-related chores have always been a scheduling hassle - this year it broke my heart when ECB had to skip out early of a game to TCB. That's something that we can definitely refine, probably by accounting for prep and clean-up outside of the game slots. So Lunch and dinner are two hour things, with a half hour of scheduled work on either end. If you are free, you could use that time to do something else I suppose -like a dedicated board game time. Just a thought.

    I was Kitchen Boss Friday night and I let my Masters know who wasn't there to clean up. I assume they re-assigned those folks.

    I thought the schedule, in terms of where and when the game slots were placed, worked very well.
  • And Jason, if you would like me to run a playtest of Fiasco, I would be glad to. Especially if you have a specific scenario you would like tested. I want to see how the twists would unfold in a different game. I'm headed to Jiffycon this weekend although I believe the RPG slots are filled. If not, I'll try to jump in or run it at nerdnyc's Recess the week after.

    That reminds me that I need to write up my notes from my A Taste For Murder game for Graham. Another fantastic game. Which someone ran at Camp Nerdly. Everyone said they had fun and I overheard people discussing how being american influenced their play of the game. I'd love to hear more about that.
  • edited June 2009
    Camp Nerdly was 100% fun for me again. I enjoyed all the games I played in: 1000 blank cards, Spione, Kagematsu, Montsegur (though I wish I'd not had to leave early), Ganakagok Jeepforged. And was grateful for the willingness and energy that people brought to the Freeform Sampler workshop. The late night conversations on Saturday, and lingering leaving on Sunday were also wonderful.

    One hard part for me was working on dinner, Saturday night. The crew was wonderful, but we just didn't have enough time to do everything, so dinner was late. I'd very much suggest having at least an hour prep time scheduled for dinner. I don't know if other meals need that. I was also wishing I had a few more containers in the kitchen for prep and presentation. Thank so much to whoever provided our kitchen tools and all the food!

    Also food oriented, I noticed for Saturday morning's breakfast, someone had posted notes about the food and what to prepare. I foolishly assumed we'd get that for all the meals. I wish I'd done it independently when I realized that was not so.

    All in all, a fantastic con. I like how much of the systems run themselves, and how people step up to fill gaps.
  • Adam, that's a great point about the wiki sign-ups. If we want to run a prep heavy game or a game that involves carrying a lot of parts, it is helpful to measure the level of interest in playing beforehand.

    Metrocalypse creatures to test would very easy. Especially if they range from level 5-8. Linked encounters are also great. In terms of characters, I'd say give us both pregens and guidelines. I'll try to get people to use the guidelines but if time runs short, at least we can still move forward with pregens. Hit me up over on gmail whenever you are ready. It's my story games username + @gmail.com. And we can arrange a skype call to relay feedback to save time on long APs that may not be what you exactly need.
  • Yeah, those step-by-step instructions for meal prep were distilled excellence with a dash of cayenne. Kudos to whomever did that. I'd love to see those for all meals. Whoever wrote it knew WTF they were doing.

    I'll echo Emily in saying that it was cool to see the systems run themselves. However, I also will point out my Deist leanings and thank the gods that created those systems, assigned people to them, and kept a benevolent eye on them throughout the weekend. I know Clinton deserves much thanks. Who else should I be thanking?
  • That was Steve Segedy with the prep instructions. He's a smart guy.
  • Another placeholder - we need to arrange some way to share knowledge between Camp Nerdly, Nerdly Beach Party, Go Play Northwest, Jiffycon, Recess, and so forth. I feel like we are all busily re-inventing wheels.
  • So, I'm a horrible blogger (as I rarely blog). Right now I'm chatting with Albert about NBP/CN comparisons, and I'll post that up in some form later. But, while I'm a horrible blogger, I tend to be a verbose conversationalist. I'm willing to share thoughts over IM at the drop of a hat.
  • edited June 2009
    This was my first Nerdly. I had a lot of fun, and overall I think everything went smoothly.

    Chores
    I think adding some time around meals for chores would be helpful. I think it's workable if people have to cut out or hold back 10-15 minutes before/after meals, but I ended up spending 30+ minutes cleaning up after dinner Sat. I didn't mind, but I wouldn't want to ask anyone else to stay that long.

    So maybe schedule 1.5 hours for breakfast & lunch (15 min for prep and clean up each), and 2 hours for dinner (45 min for prep & 15 for clean up)? How does that sound? That would make Saturday's schedule something like:
    8:00 - Breakfast
    9:30 - Gaming A (3 hrs)
    12:30 - Lunch
    2:00 - Gaming B (3 hrs)
    5:00 - Dinner
    7:00 - Gaming C (3 hrs)
    10:00 - Gaming D (2-3 hrs)
    Scheduling
    Using the Wiki to gauge interest was helpful, but I'm not sure about the actual scheduling. I "signed up" for a bunch of stuff early on, before the schedule came out. But when I got there, a number of games I was interested in ended up getting scheduled in conflict with one another.

    *Personally*, I would either get rid of the online scheduling and make everyone do it on the spot, or I would tighten it and make everyone do all their scheduling & sign-ups ahead of time.
  • Posted By: Adam DrayMy one major regret was that Frank asked me to reserve a spot for him in my D&D Metrocalypse game. Then he went off like a good soldier to clean the kitchen after lunch and lost his spot. I offered to shoehorn him back in when he got done but he declined, probably because the table was full. Frank, I apologize.
    This was my fault- I jumped into the game when it looked like there was space, not realizing that Frank was busy cleaning. My apologies to both of you guys for the hassle, but thanks for letting me play!
    Posted By: Emily CareAlso food oriented, I noticed for Saturday morning's breakfast, someone had posted notes about the food and what to prepare. I foolishly assumed we'd get that for all the meals. I wish I'd done it independently when I realized that was not so.
    Yeah, I think there definitely needs to be a volunteer specifically tasked with overseeing all the meals and creating plans like these. I wanted to make sure breakfast went off without too many problems, which is why I wrote this up the night before. I left it because Sunday had the same menu, but we should have done them for the other meals as well.

    A larger problem with meal preparation is the lack of decent equipment. It's great that folks are willing to risk their pots, pans, knives, etc., but it's hard to count on having the things you need. Big thanks to Eric and Lisa for missing some Saturday morning games to go out and get pot holders, spatulas and other essential cooking implements. I don't know what happened to that stuff, but maybe in the future we can store it all together in a box at someone's house and haul it up each spring.
  • One possible solution for the chores cutting into gaming time and affecting lots of people in lots of different games: All food preppers for a given meal and/or all meal cleanup folks are in the same game. This produces more work in planning games and has the potential to put a person into more chores if not done just so, but there might be a way to make it work. Maybe for each slot that's normally 4 hours, there is one 3 hour game, and the meal captain for that meal or the cleanup captain is responsible for running a game in that reduced time slot and finding people to volunteer for their game/chore combo slot. Like I might run "Saturday Dinner Cleanup followed by In a Wicked Age" or "Car Wars followed by Lunch Prep". Then nobody in that combo slot has to worry about missing out on their gaming, and the crew bonds not just through the game but through shared chores. Does that solve problems or create more problems?
  • It's a cool idea, but I think it creates more problems than it solves. I don't think the problem is that people can't find something to play in. It's that they get shut out of some really awesome games because they're scrubbing pots and mopping floors.

    I'm wondering, if we just assigned more people to kitchen clean-up, could we get it done superspeed-pronto and then get on with gaming? Maybe a simple rule of "no one plays until the kitchen is clean" would git-er-done quickly.
  • Posted By: Adam DrayI'm wondering, if we just assigned more people to kitchen clean-up, could we get it done superspeed-pronto and then get on with gaming?
    So, like, everyone would get a second chore? Hmm, I'm not sure if that would help or not. More people require more equipment, and as it was, we were passing around stuff when I cleaned the kitchen. Some things also have to wait until other things are done (namely sweeping and mopping) and some things just take time (namely dishes, since there was only one sink we commandeer for that purpose).

    I didn't do any cooking, so I don't know what the issues are on that front, but it would probably help if there was some way to do food prep ahead of time (like they do in restaurants). I'm not sure who or how that would fit in, but it's something to think about. It would certainly speed up cooking if all the cooks had to do is pull something out of the frig and plop it onto a hot pan or whatever.
  • Posted By: timfireIt would certainly speed up cooking if all the cooks had to do is pull something out of the frig and plop it onto a hot pan or whatever.
    I'm pretty sure this is the way it was done for the pasta and jars of Ragu. =) Salads and veggies take more prep, obviously. There's only one dinner cooked at Nerdly, so we can probably just fix the cleaning thing by adding in cleanup time after the meal. As has been pointed out to me, more hands does not necessarily speed things up. The mythical man minute or something like that. ;)
  • edited June 2009
    Posted By: Adam Dray
    I kinda got left for dead on cleanup after Friday snacks, since my Grime Assassin compatriots hadn't yet arrived. It wasn't a huge deal -- there wasn't a lot to clean up -- but it would have been three times quicker with help. Since it's hardly a secret who was assigned to Friday cleanup, I'm gonna call some folks out. Andrew Morris and Sean Leventhal: where were you guys? I know Andrew arrived late. If you knew you were going to arrive late, you should have swapped chores with someone. Especially after making some public comments about hating chores and offering to pay to get out them. It looks bad.
    This is totally fair. Basically I screwed up. I was confused about where I was supposed to be and when, ended up there at the wrong time, left you hanging and felt like crap about it all weekend. I'm really sorry Adam. I tried to find other things to do, but it still wasn't fair to you.
  • Posted By: Adam DrayIt's a cool idea, but I think it creates more problems than it solves. I don't think the problem is that people can't find something to play in. It's that they get shut out of some really awesome games because they're scrubbing pots and mopping floors.

    I'm wondering, if we just assigned more people to kitchen clean-up, could we get it done superspeed-pronto and then get on with gaming? Maybe a simple rule of "no one plays until the kitchen is clean" would git-er-done quickly.
    I think the other thing we could do with this is to get the kitchen cleanup people first in line for food, and started cleaning before the meal is completely up.
  • Posted By: Esarel
    I think the other thing we could do with this is to get the kitchen cleanup people first in line for food, and started cleaning before the meal is completely up.
    Yes, brilliant! I doubt people would mind cleanup folks jumping to the front of the line.
  • Overall I thought nerdly went pretty well. I wish that the page where people listed games had them placed in the time slot they were going to be offered, but the big paper of games worked, and everyone did a good job of getting people in games. One of the ones I was looking forward to was canceled, but I had no trouble finding other stuff to do.
  • Posted By: Adam DrayThe main thing I'd change is to leave a little more time after the big meals for people to clean up, or assign more cleaners to those chores. People shouldn't have to miss games because they are washing pots.
    I'd add some more time on the other end, as well: people shouldn't have to miss games because they need to cook food.

    Also, a Note for Tha Fyoot-Ture: If you need to boil water (like, for pasta), the size of the pots and the amount of water means that this will take a LONG TIME (20+ minutes), so get those going absolutely first thing.
  • Thanks for all the feedback, everyone. Please keep it coming.

  • Posted By: Adam DrayI kinda got left for dead on cleanup after Friday snacks, since my Grime Assassin compatriots hadn't yet arrived. It wasn't a huge deal -- there wasn't a lot to clean up -- but it would have been three times quicker with help. Since it's hardly a secret who was assigned to Friday cleanup, I'm gonna call some folks out. Andrew Morris and Sean Leventhal: where were you guys? I know Andrew arrived late. If you knew you were going to arrive late, you should have swapped chores with someone. Especially after making some public comments about hating chores and offering to pay to get out them. It looks bad.
    Wow...unpleasant and unsympathetic personal criticism. Not exactly what I was expecting. I left at 11:30 a.m. for what was supposed to be a four-hour drive. Due to traffic and other problems on the trip, I didn't get to the camp until 8:15 p.m. I only had the phone number for one other person attending, and he got there around the same time that I did. When I arrived, I checked to see if there was anything left to be done. When another chore slot had missing people, I was happy to pitch in and help. And not liking chores isn't the same as intentionally shirking them.
  • To be fair, I should interject that both Sean and Andrew helped me out in the kitchen for Saturday lunch, at which time I could have used a little more guidance on what was supposed to go out (all the soup) and what wasn't (lettuce and tomatoes?) I don't even know if I had any oven masters; I've deliberately avoided that part of the wiki. It's enough to make a man start believing in hierarchy again. Let me say that I like the idea of feeding the clean-up crews first, including the bathroom crew.
  • The "front of the line" thing sounds good in theory but it seems like it would be awkward to implement in practice. I also really like the "we're the kitchen crew; we game together" idea. My gut feeling is that the best practical solution is more time on both ends of each meal, though.

    Another option would be no prepared meals at all, which simplifies and complicates in equal measure, but might work out fine. It did at Camp Nerdly Zero on a much smaller scale.
  • Posted By: Jason MorningstarThe "front of the line" thing sounds good in theory but it seems like it would be awkward to implement in practice. I also really like the "we're the kitchen crew; we game together" idea. My gut feeling is that the best practical solution is more time on both ends of each meal, though.
    Eh, you're probably right. Informal social rules are probably enough: "Hey, I'm clean-up crew and I got here late--mind if I cut in line?"
  • I'm wondering if a big clock and multiple postings of the work schedule would be helpful?
  • I was thinking that folks loosing track of the time might have been part of the problem. A clock might not be a terrible idea.

  • Posted By: Andrew MorrisWow...unpleasant and unsympathetic personal criticism.
    I publicly apologize. I made the mistake of suggesting bad intentions before finding out what really happened. My bad. I'm sorry for being an asshole and calling you out like that without knowing the truth.
  • Adding more time around meals is basically just increasing the margin of error, while starting clean-up early is basically asking for a higher level of discipline.

    My personal opinion is that you'll see better results if you make things easier for people (give them a greater margin of error), rather than asking more of them.

    And if people are concerned about taking time away from gaming, there's no rule saying you can't start a game early if none of the players are doing clean-up.
  • When we had the sign up sheets of the games at the front door, there were names.

    Maybe choreites could note that they have a chore to complete before arrival, letting the facilitator know to wait for them.

    Then, if the player is taking a while, some of the group can go help if possible, or check up on them at least. Then that player can either give up their slot, if necessary, or give an eta for their arrival.
  • Posted By: Mark CauseyMaybe choreites could note that they have a chore to complete before arrival, letting the facilitator know to wait for them.
    Except then dumbasses like me totally fail to reserve Frank's spot while he washes dishes, and then I feel terrible and Frank doesn't get to play D&D.
  • I may be getting a bit blasphemous here, but what would you all think if we used more disposable cooking & eating materials next year?

    There's been a suggestion floated for having a local caterer prepare a few trays of lasagna for Saturday dinner next year. Having something that could be popped in the oven and then left to warm up/cook would reduce prep time. Having those same meals delivered in disposable tinfoil baking pans would reduce cleanup time.

    Similarly, if we were to provide paper plates and plastic utensils, that would eliminate the need for folks to stand in line to clean their own dishes after a meal. That would, in turn, open up the second sink for additional kitchen cleanup volunteers to get the other preparation and serving dishes clean much faster.

    I'm imagining that disposable dining materials, plus reduced prep time, plus encouraging the cleaning crews to jump the dinner line & move straight from eating to cleaning, might mean that cleaning could be done within minutes of last call for serving yourself.

    I think I could plan & tune this thing to hum like a well oiled machine with a minimum of fuss (on the weekend of the event). The question is: Are the potential benefits of disposable eating & cooking gear (15-20 minutes per cleaner, maybe) worth the extra trash we will produce?

  • I know that we use a variant on this stuff for our picnics.

    And before anyone mentions another word about environmental stuff, just look at how much gas got burned getting bums in cabins.

  • Posted By: Jason MorningstarThe "front of the line" thing sounds good in theory but it seems like it would be awkward to implement in practice. I also really like the "we're the kitchen crew; we game together" idea. My gut feeling is that the best practical solution is more time on both ends of each meal, though.

    Another option would be no prepared meals at all, which simplifies and complicates in equal measure, but might work out fine. It did at Camp Nerdly Zero on a much smaller scale.
    I like the game together idea too, it sounds good. As far as more time on meals I have this suspicion that games will expand to fill any empty time. A lot of the games I played in were cramped for time. No prepared meals is not a bad idea either.

    I don't want all this talk about chores to distract the organizers from the fact that Camp Nerdly was a ton of fun again. The organizers did a better job than ever before in getting everyone in a game, which was awesome.
Sign In or Register to comment.