Killjoy Cooking With the Dungeons & Dragons Crowd

edited June 2008 in Story Games
Funny stuff...

"If geeks talked about cookbooks the way they talk about RPG books, the results would not be pretty: "
http://www.wired.com/culture/lifestyle/commentary/alttext/2008/06/alttext_0618

Comments

  • I haven't checked the "Stuff to Watch" of this month, but if it isn't there, it definitely should be.
  • Ah, crap, it was in there. Sorry for the repost.

    Ironically, I always forget to watch "Stuff to Watch".
  • It's a funny article, but it's missing one important part. I don't have to buy the latest edition of my cookbook to keep up with my stove's interests in gaming, nor do I have to consider whether my internal organs will participate in breaking down the food I've cooked. It acts like the game exists in some sort of a vacuum where there's just one guy and one book and nothing else. The reality is that this is a social hobby and for many folk a new edition means having a difficult time playing the older edition.
  • Ah, go back to dragonscook.org with the other grognards, you old fatbeard.
  • The gang at NerdNYC ended up having a large discussion of which analogies are better suited. I stand by my assertion that it's like the fondue craze way back. Eventually, fondue parties are going to go out of style, and if the publisher of a fondue recipe book decides it's time to start publishing tapas cookbooks to take advantage of a new craze, well--sooner or later it will happen anyway. If you think fondue parties are a lot more fun than tapas parties, there's not a lot to tell you except that people are going to move on.
  • edited June 2008
    Posted: 2:31 a.m. by Apologist: I really have to compare this to any metaphor which forgives any aspect of the book. Since this is upbeat, it must be right, while using a metaphor to damn any aspect of the book is downbeat, and wrong for being downbeat. I will stringently avoid using any actual metric for measuring what following the text actually does, because there are more important matters to attend to first. Really, this is about people and who is right and who is wrong. Clearly if people are downbeat, they are wrong. How can the books actual function matter when we have wrong people to talk about? Bad people! Their bad people! Don't you care that you allow evil people amongst you? You'd rather be looking at a line of text and asking yourself what it actually instructs, rather than dealing with bad people? Honestly, what comes first with you!?
  • C.W.R.,
    Cooking and dining are highly social as well. Having recipes that don't work when you're trying to have a big, jovial dinner party provides similar frustrations to a RPG session bottoming out due to system disagreements and poorly framed rules.
  • Actually, chefs talk like they do in the article about their books and recipies. At least, the one I lived with, did.
    You should have seen people freak out when they made changes to Larousse Gastronomic.

    My father pointed out a similarity to the change from small golf club heads to larger ones the other day. Plenty of people refused to play with the new bigger heads, which gave you a straighter, more controlled shot, but a lot lousier distance.

    It's kind of a suspicious analogy, really. But, you know, Hasbro has a lot of pull. And it's not like bigger heads on golf clubs was a bad idea, it's just not what everyone wanted. What sucked was when it became really, really, really hard to find smaller head clubs, Dad said. And don't even get my old roomie the chef started about the big Polenta craze a few years back!
  • Posted By: Arpiethe big Polenta craze a few years back!
    Posted By: joepubaving recipes that don't work when you're trying to have a big, jovial dinner party provides similar frustrations to a RPG
    Posted By: C.W.RichesonI don't have to buy the latest edition of my cookbook to keep up with my stove's interests in gaming, nor do I have to consider whether my internal organs will participate in breaking down the food I've cooked.
    Hilarious! You got me! I'm a freeform hippie-cook! LOL!

    This one's the best: As I have pointed out MANY TIMES, several of these recipes contain raisins, and I, like most people, am ALLERGIC to raisins! And before you tell me to substitute dried cranberries, I will reiterate that I am discussing the recipes AS WRITTEN. I do not appreciate your ATTACKING ME with helpful suggestions!

    ROLOL! :-)))
  • Posted By: joepubC.W.R.,
    Cooking and dining are highly social as well. Having recipes that don't work when you're trying to have a big, jovial dinner party provides similar frustrations to a RPG session bottoming out due to system disagreements and poorly framed rules.
    Sure. I would never argue that cooking isn't a social activity and that it can't have frustrations. I just don't find the humorous mockery of the article to take in the reality of the situation, which is that many folk may find themselves switching to a new system fi they want to keep playing.
  • Posted By: Tomas HVMHilarious! You got me! I'm a freeform hippie-cook! LOL!

    This one's the best:As I have pointed out MANY TIMES, several of these recipes contain raisins, and I, like most people, am ALLERGIC to raisins! And before you tell me to substitute dried cranberries, I will reiterate that I am discussing the recipes AS WRITTEN. I do not appreciate your ATTACKING ME with helpful suggestions!

    ROLOL! :-)))
    It is, indeed, a thing of beauty!

    :: sniff ::

    -Marco
  • Infinite oregano. There's little cooler.

    If I ever needed to pick a new screen name for a forum, I think I'll go with Infinite Oregano.
  • Posted By: C.W.RichesonI just don't find the humorous mockery of the article to take in the reality of the situation, which is that many folk may find themselves switching to a new system if they want to keep playing.
    ...since now that the new edition is out everyone is required to throw their old edition books at the gigantic mandatory bonfire that Wizards imposed to anyone interested in playing the game...
  • Along with my precious macaroni recipe!
  • Posted By: Tristan...since now that the new edition is out everyone is required to throw their old edition books at the gigantic mandatory bonfire that Wizards imposed to anyone interested in playing the game...
    Howdy, Tristan!

    I think you may be reading a bit more into my post. I said 'many folk may" which is true. Plenty of groups will switch right over. I think you're putting me in the position of making an absolutist statement about everyone, which is not the case. Many folk may != everyone required.
  • I am not "attacking" you. I am "attacking" those "many". :D Sorry if I wasn't clear enough.

    Following the analogy, it's as if the new cooking book would mean you no longer can use your old books... Having to buy every new book as it comes is a problem of the compulsive buyers, that the corporations take advantage of, and not the other way around.
  • A friend posted this on LIve JOurnal the other day. I felt odd because I haven't played a game like that in so long I didn't get the jokes. :(
  • The jokes actually don't have anything to do with the game itself. It's about a switch from one edition to another and how people approach game rules texts. I can't find a single one that requires D&D knowledge.
  • I guess I just never listened to people really debate something like that before.
  • Scary, isn't it?

    I still love the idea of someone approaching a recipe like they do when looking to find fault in an RPG text. Infinite oregano. That's just hilarious.
Sign In or Register to comment.