Podcasters: How do you record?

edited May 2008 in Story Games
I've got me a headsetty thing, and I'm thinking about recording up some stuff for putting online - not a regular podcast, just a now and then thing about theory stuffs and the like.

And, well, I'm looking for software - cheap / free stuff - to do this with. What are folks here using?

Comments

  • Audacity?

    Simple, powerful and free.

    If you want something MORE powerful, but also much less friendly looking,

    Ardour2
    still free (I never suggest nonfree software, as a general rule)

    ...all in theory: I don't do podcasts :)
    But I'm sure some of the practitioning podcasters will chime in shortly.
  • Posted By: renatoramAudacity?

    Simple, powerful and free.
    This appears to work!

    Aha!
  • Be my guest :)

    And let us know when/where you release your stuff!
  • Audacity is excellent and I have no complaints about it. As far as I know, it's what almost all podcasters use.
  • Yay for free software! :)
  • I've had a lot of problems trying to do my podcast. In fact I haven't done one since last October, though I am hoping to start again before Origins. I use Audacity, but I'm not very skilled with it. Even so, it has proven fairly easy to use.

    ME
  • Audacity is great for a solitary person talking into a mic. I use it for editing my show and recording my solo bits. Audacity would work great for you, Levi.
  • Yup, I guess if you have a funky setup with multiple microphones for different speakers and so on, Ardour is probably better: as you can see in the humongous screenshot on the homepage it supports pretty much whatever you can think of, managing multiple microphones, mixing the cannels live, and son on...
  • edited May 2008
    Audacity is decent. From what I hear other software does things that are magical. Other software costs a good deal of money. My Arsenal consists of Audacity, and the Levelator. The levelator is not always the best option, but I typically run a .wav through and listen to the results. Editing in audacity typically goes:

    1. Use a negative value on amplify for any serious spikes I have from plosives or high frequency things that happened during the recording.
    2. Equalization.
    3. Compression.
    4. Positive value for amplify for the whole track if needed.
    5. Normalize.

    I don't mess with any of the standard settings just click and wait. Of course this is ideal, sometimes there are problems and it's much more troublesome.

    You should be fine with headsets for your own use. I tend to recommend the type of headsets that have a usb end. A lot of noise can be added by the constant polling of the PCI bus. I'm not sure if this is a problem if the two 1/8" plugs are actually on the motherboard. Anyway, USB headphone mics are made for noisy situations, so there are actually two mics, one for recording you, the other for recording whats going on in the room and removing that from your sound.
  • Clyde, good suggestions. That will be useful to me when I record next time.

    ME
  • Basically, Audacity. Actually, when my podcast partner and I started out, we were physically in the same place, so I was able to record with Audacity. Now we are 6,000 miles apart so we record with Skype and Skype Recorder, which really isn't optimum, but is certainly on budget (which is essentially zero). I still edit the show using Audacity, and I mix the whole thing together with Garage Band (I could record and edit in Garage Band but it's a complex beast. I really should learn to use it better). When it's done, I run it through Levelator. Hosting is on Libsyn. Total cost: $30 for Skype Recorder, $5/month for hosting. What we lack in sound quality is hopefully made up for by content quality. I could lay out some bucks for a nice microphone, but the built-in mic on my Mac is doing the job.
  • Mike... if you check out linux you can record skype for free... but yeah, if you already have that...

    For others, there's the "SCX Recorder" which is free. I found the source package broken, but acuiring the sources from svn fixed that, and it works. If anyone needs help getting this to work on linux, drop me a line. I'll be happy to help.
  • One could also use the Gizmo Project for VoIP calls that can be recorded. I only tried it once, but it did work pretty well, IIRC.
  • Yeah, that, also. I'm under the impression that it also better supports voice conferences with many participants (having a real server and not relying on people's pcs :) )
  • How about if you're on Windows? What's a good, free way to record a Skype conversation?
  • Audacity and a mike. Logitech has a good one for $20
  • Posted By: WillowHow about if you're on Windows? What's a good, free way to record a Skype conversation?
    There's no free software solution there. I think it's possible that both speakers record on their side side with a second program like Audacity and you then splice it together, but other then that, there are no free programs that do that on Windows.
  • @Willow: if you use a live linux install on USB stick (there are several, I'd advise about Fedora or Ubuntu) you can then install skype and the SCX Recorder.

    ...I'll send you the binary of scx-recorder if you choose to go fedora :)

    Unless you have a really weird setup you should be able to boot from USB and go online in a snap :)
  • Audacity, Radio Shack mixer, and Radio Shack mic. Works just fine.
  • Posted By: Lord MinxThere's no free software solution there. I think it's possible that both speakers record on their side side with a second program like Audacity and you then splice it together, but other then that, there are no free programs that do that on Windows.
    That's exactly what a friend and I are doing for our podcast-in-development, except Skype takes complete control of the sound card, so we're each talking on cell phones while recording our respective sides in Audacity. Then he sends me an mp3 and I mash the tracks together, again in Audacity. The setup has actually been surprisingly useful; it's a comedy podcast, but since each of the tracks has no pickup at all from the other user, I can fiddle and tweak the timing without worrying about an echo (which is to say, the same effect we could get by being in the same room and having much more expensive mics).
  • Brendan... if you're technically apt like that... it would be orders of magnitude more simple for you to just use linux and record directly.

    Or Gizmo phone, on mac/linux/windows. It's like skype
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