[Sight and Sound] Sounds for Little Ones

edited September 2007 in Game Design Help
Here's what I've got so far. That title, by the way, is the name of the album from which Sound C was taken. As a title for the game, it is utterly provisional. I'm also using Sight C and Concept A.

Take Sight C and divide it up into a 3x4 grid of square cards. (I'll probably crop it a bit.) Shuffle these cards and deal them out equally to the 4 players.

You have a board, which happens to be the same size as all the cards when assembled. Overlaid on the board is a 3x4 grid matching the cards. The board will be a loose (probably very loose) adaptation of this map. There will be approximately 2 locations on each square of the 3x4 grid, with paths between the locations. The paths won't correspond to the grid necessarily. (This will make a lot more sense when I get a chance to draw it out.)

The plot: the characters are children that the real players knew when they were younger - at some school-days age the group agrees on before play starts. The characters are said to attend the same school in the same town. But they've woken up here in Fairyland, long after closing, when there are no other visitors and the sky is dark. Somewhere on the grounds is the Caretaker, and without thinking, you know that you don't want to meet him.

Spurred by the sound recording associated with the location in which the character starts, and by real memories of strange things the real players saw when they were children, the other three players will build a scene for that character collaboratively. What you want is to escape with your life back to the real world, but only one character will. Whether the rest are shades, or aspects of the survivor, or aspects of the real world to which the survivor returns, is an open question.

I have more, but it's a big mess and I need to get back to work. Stay tuned. Thoughts appreciated.

Comments

  • Interesting. So you're also making a competitive, boardgamey RPG. Do you envision your victory condition to be something like "last man standing" or "whoever has more/less X at endgame"?
  • I'd hope that it wouldn't play out as "last man standing" as much as "we eventually stop taking turns GMing for each other and transition to a one-player-many-GMs model."

    It might be better, however, if I stop being handwavey about the other characters maybe being aspects of the "winning" character in real life, and figure out some explicit mechanical way to make that happen.

    First though, the rest of the frigging game.
  • Posted By: misubaI'd hope that it wouldn't play out as "last man standing" as much as "we eventually stop taking turns GMing for each other and transition to a one-player-many-GMs model."
    So, "last mand standing"-ish, but replacing "do nothing" with "do something else, but you still won't 'win'?" At least, that's what I'm reading here.
  • edited September 2007
    So I thought some more, along the lines of "dammit, why can't I ever find an actual game mechanic when I go scrabbling around in these game spaces," and I remembered: the Yes-But cards! People like those, and I'm not using them anywhere else currently.

    And! I went back to that old post that Shreyas made that crystallized the idea for me in the first place. And I thought, how do you know when you're done drawing cards? Do you just keep going, and that's the game? I mean, how do you know when it's someone else's go?

    So, thinking about that, and about generally how to get more relationship into this game, I came up with the complication cards. So it goes:
    ----------------------
    | YES, BUT! |
    | |
    | Your way is |
    | blocked by a |
    | frenetic, scary |
    | surprise! |
    | |
    | (3) (#) |
    ----------------------
    That (3) is a 3 in a circle. That (#) is a circle filled with a dark color.

    In short, you're gonna have two relationships: Shadow (some who remembers something about you, but that you don't think much about necessarily) and Light (the reverse). Draw 5 points worth of complications on one of those two, and it's time to resolve the scene... by either convincing the player in question to change their relationship to you, or losing like hell.

    The relationships are going to somehow come out of the sounds that play when you put your keys into Fairyland's sound boxes. Write down any ways of relating to people that you hear in the shpiel, then cross 'em off as you use 'em.

    That's all I've got thus far... hopefully some of it makes sense.
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