blades position effect advantage disadvantage translator

edited May 9 in Actual Play
Position:

Desperate: They have advantage
Risky: normal
Controlled: They have disadvantage

Effect:
Limited: You have disadvantage
Standard: normal
Great: You have advantage

Comments

  • edited May 9
    position: how likely are they to hurt you

    effect: how much can you hurt them.

    with disad you're much less likely to crit (0.25%), with normal it's 5% and with adv it's 9.75, almost double the normal chance
  • This is great conceptual translation; the actual math doesn't map one-to-one, of course. Still, very helpful, since I have a lot more experience running 5E than Blades.
  • edited May 10
    Effect in Blades is all about how much can be accomplished in a single roll, rather than your odds of rolling a success.

    Otherwise, this translator makes sense to me.
  • edited May 11
    Yeah, D&D doesn't have an "effect" toggle, except for damage (usually, anyway), through things like feats and sneak attack. It would be an interesting thing to play with, if there was a way to make it work.

    Otherwise, this is a clever translator... except that in most D&D situations, "they" don't roll anything, which makes it less useful, unfortunately.
  • edited May 11
    Here's an alternate take, inspired by another current thread:

    Position:

    Desperate: On a failure, "no, and"
    Risky: On a failure, "no"
    Controlled: On a failure, "no, but"

    Effect:
    Limited: On a success, "yes, but"
    Standard: On a success, "yes"
    Great: On a success, "yes, and"
    I could see that being useful as a "beginner GM training tool" for some games, perhaps.
  • edited May 11
    Paul_T said:

    Otherwise, this is a clever translator... except that in most D&D situations, "they" don't roll anything, which makes it less useful, unfortunately.

    That's only my house rule; in the normal D&D they do♥
    The DM rolls attack for the monsters

    This observation btw started with me being frustrated with blades; it felt so subjective. And then I realized that wait a minute… don't 5e also have the exact same "choose between nine situations" thing going on? Equally subjective

    Or, uh, "consistent adjudication" :bawling:
  • Indeed!
    2097 said:


    That's only my house rule; in the normal D&D they do♥
    The DM rolls attack for the monsters

    That was my point: it's only when two characters are fighting that this applies, not in the rest of the game.
  • I think these translations are sort of a way to help wrap your minds around various games rather than something to directly apply. Training wheels that should fall off sooner rather than later;

    I was talking to a friend about this; we've dropped the skills in 5e in favor of making ability checks. How I, much quicker than I thought I would, went from "OK, a grapple is Athletics, and now we roll Strength instead of Athletics" to "OK, a grapple is strength", even after almost five years of using the skills.
  • I think that "they have advantage/disadvantage" is actually easier and clearer than thinking in terms of "position" and "effect"; not much gained there, in terms of actual tools to bring to play, unless you happen to transitioning from one game to the other and aren't used to the new one yet.

    I kind of like my version, though. It gets you to think, "Well, you're in a controlled position, but your effect is standard, so you will either score a 'yes' or a 'no, but'. Not bad! However, if your position is desperate and your effect is limited, your best outcome is a 'yes, but'... and on a failure, you're going to have to deal with a 'no, and'." That could be really useful for a GM in training, perhaps.
  • As I tried to say, don't actually translate things. It's more a "what the heck is this game? oh, ok, i can see how things are sorta similar".

    I don't think the yes-but stuff belongs in D&D!

    If there is only one obvious outcome, don't roll.

    If there are two obvious outcomes, normal binary roll vs DC. (DC 15 is good.)

    If there are more than two obvious outcomes, have two DCs; one for mediocre and one for good. (DCs 12 and 20 respectively are good, or 7 and 10 if you're doing 2d6). Put the worst outcome lowest, the best outcome highest, and on a "mediocre" roll the player gets to choose between all the other outcomes. (In a ternary situation where there is only one, well, there you go.)
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