Learning curve

What would you say is the way you would be shortening the learning curve, the thing you do or the thing you would want to see, I am not talking about making the rules easier, just how to ease the learning of rules ...

Comments

  • I love the way Fate Core (not FAE!!!!) does it. Page 292 and 293. (It should've been first spread not last spread.)

    What I mean is that it is a really really good overview of everything in the entire book, and it has page numbers.
  • Summery is the way, you say.
  • Also, offering up a pregen version. Like the D&D starter set where the characters are already made
  • Yes, intro setup and intro learning scenarios is good.
  • My best success has been with "guided learning": taking new players through the steps of the game, one by one, so they experience them in action instead of trying to absorb rules and procedures. Easy to do in person; much less clear how to do it in written form.
  • A set of guide rules cards with instructions maybe ...
  • Having both a guide and an overview/summary is good.
    I personally loved how the board game version of This War of Mine worked, with a rule book that had you go "Do these things, and then turn to page 10" and it had you flipping back and forth through the book throughout the entire game. But while I loved that, my friend was close to flipping the table. He wanted to be able to learn the rules, see an overview of them
  • The instructions I have read about writing rules say you need to choose either an indexing approach to the writing or a more talkier; or to do two versions of the rules.
  • A summary/index of rules, intro scenarios and a step by step guide for important parts. ... is the tips so far, seems solid!
  • Yes, you've got to choose between reference manual and learning material.
  • DeReel said:

    Yes, you've got to choose between reference manual and learning material.

    I think, if you can, do both.
  • DeReel said:

    Yes, you've got to choose between reference manual and learning material.

    I think, if you can, do both.
    I've seen a number of board game instructional videos at this point, either company made or fan-made.

    I suspect that is the best way to go, and closest to having a person directly teaching you 1 on 1. Doing this and leaving the text as a reference manual, I mean.
  • Would be fun to see if one manage to explain the same rules as: reference card with summary, index paragraph, sample scenario, comics page, part of a short novel ... and maybe a video as well. Just for the sport.
  • The 3 last medias require more than red acting skills. They imply some sort of team or budget for hiring competent pros...
  • I do know the last three skills, but that said, rules are hard to ...
  • DeReel said:

    The 3 last medias require more than red acting skills. They imply some sort of team or budget for hiring competent pros...

    I've seen a number of fan made play through videos.

    I mean, yes, a budget for a camera, some set up space and time, and some editing software and know-how is necessary.


    But...not like a lot of that stuff. I would expect that a fair few people who are members of this very site would have all of that available to them right now.


    I'm not sure why you'd think professionals would need to be involved. I mean, that would be nice, but I doubt necessary.
  • Would be fun to see what could be done with Adobe Spark and a smartphone.
  • Out of curiosity, have any of you ever popped over to say, boardgamegeek and followed links about a game to a fan made video about the game?

    If you haven't, doing that might help to understand what I'm talking about.
  • Do you have any favorites?
  • Each one is not that hard to do. But all these competences in the same person is not common.
  • Some are not common, but you could colaborate as well ...
  • edited April 6
    Paul_T said:

    Do you have any favorites?

    I'll check later for one. I was very confused about Mansions of Madness 1e, and found a series of remote APs episodes ( around 25 for one fully remote played game!) on youtube.


    That's the kind of thing I'm thinking of in terms of fan-made video playthroughs. Company videos tend to be a bit more refined, in general.

    OTOH, I suspect DeReel is imagining something way more involved than what is usually done.

    Not a favorite, but one I randomly found for Last Night on Earth:
  • ... and Risus style stick figure comics. I see now I was setting unnecessarily high standards.
  • DeReel said:

    ... and Risus style stick figure comics. I see now I was setting unnecessarily high standards.

    Exactly ;D
  • That tutorial video seems pretty neat, but nothing groundbreaking. I've seen stuff like that for RPGs, too - I think it's a good thing to do.

    I've discussed a more in-depth tutorial before, though, with annotations, which could be used as a reference, too, learning new things each time. (Anyone remember that thread?)
  • I attended a panel on instructional design where the presenters said to structure play so that players can learn things in the proper sequence. Give them a thing to do, that teaches them A. Once they've learned A, then give them a thing to do that requires B, which builds on A.

    One example in RPGs is how Dogs in the Vineyard takes something that could be part of either play or character creation and sticks it in between the two as a way to teach the simplest version of the core dice mechanic.
  • Many RPGs are bought by GMs and introduced to players by those GMs. In those cases "introducing your RPG" is really about helping the GM introduce your RPG.

    So, I'd say the goal is to design and offer a "GM teaches players" process that is rewarding for the GM -- something that's both (a) fun, and (b) more effective than them just winging it.

    This could be anything from an elaborate introductory process to a simple handout that helps the GM remember what to cover when.
  • Makes sense!
  • edited April 8
    I have only recently discovered actual play podcasts and now I find them a really great way to get up to speed on a new game -- especially the ones where the table talk explicitly includes talking about dice rolls and how to interpret them. The good are really good! Not professional quality sound, but good enough, and participants who avoid talking over each other.
  • Gotta second @DannyK’s comment: I’ve internalized the rules of so many systems before I ever laid eyes on their rulebooks, just by listening to well-done actual play podcasts. It flattens the learning curve dramatically if you can just listen to the game procedures being performed in context. And if the GM organizes the play well, you can hear how one part of the game builds to the next one.
  • Seeing games in action can often be more useful (or a better illustration) than any text or tutorial. However, it's also very time-consuming and can omit really vital information.

    My ideal "prep" for a game is to read the text, draft a summary of the rules as I do, then read some discussions online, and then to be a player in a well-run session of that game.
  • edited April 11
    I have positive feedback on introducing an Experience Guide to Directions Stroyplaying. This is a presentation that walks you through playing the game:
    https://sites.google.com/view/storyplaying

    So far, it is just slides. Later, I want to add voice and make this into a video.
  • Nice! Almost what I pictured when talking about making a (info)-comic about a game.
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