King David Is Dying - Something I just wrote up on the train home

I just made this on the homeward commute, so it’s got less than an hour in worktime in it, but I think it might be fun. Don’t need specific help or advice, but any and all insights are always welcome.

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King David is Dying
King David is dying and before his death, surrounded by his court, his heroes want to show him how he taught them to be a hero.

A game for three or more players about giving and receiving second chances and the change this brings, both for the recipient as the giver.

Each hero starts the story by telling the king who they were before the king inspired them. Each of the heroes were people that were unwanted during the reign of king Saul, but David gave them a second chance.

Were you a bandit, a robber, a vagabond, a baggar, a foreigner, a refugee, someone speaking out against corruption, a widow, an orphan ... ?

Tell the king how this situation was bad.

Then the king remembers. King, tell us about your first meeting with this not-yet-hero. What convinced you that they desrved a second chance.

The court is surprised. They tell how they would never have thought this to be the case and why.

The hero replies and adds how this change happened. What did the king do or say that made you change your ways.

The king affirms the hero and tells about the first time that he saw this change of heart.

The court remembers and tells how this action led to a change (for better, not worse) for the kingdom.

The king compliments the hero and tells him why he is glad that they are part of the kingdom and how it would not be the same without them.

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Thoughts:
ºTo not have the king’s role be the same all the time, maybe everytime a hero has gone through their story, they take the role of the king and the person who played the king becomes part of the court.

ºWould be fun to larp/play out, with chairs in a circle with in the middle of the circle the king laying on his deathbed (like, two chairs so they canput their feet up, or on a couple of cushions and blankets on the floor) wearing a crown or something. Once a hero in court decides to start remembering , they stand up in front of their chair and the story starts, the rest of the choir remains seated. Or there could be a chair next to the king’s deathbed in the circle, with a cape or something, which the hero has to go to, don and sit down, perhaps holding the hand of the king etc. Could just be in a circle too, where the person who has the word stands or steps forward or something.

º Doesn’t have to be about David, could be about any significant person who gave others a second chance, like Robin Hood or something. Might even be revolutionary themed by going for a Che Guevarra type of figure or something, but I don’t know enouh about him to be certain.

Comments

  • edited November 2018
    Hey, this looks a lot like this Levity game called The Wise Man. I really like that simplicity.
  • edited November 2018
    Hey, this looks a lot like this Levity game called The Wise Man. I really like that simplicity.
    Nice! That’s a cool little game. I like the gesture required to end the game. I could add something like that on to the game, like, when the king has heard enough, he exclaims that he knows his kingdom is in good hands and can rest in peace, blowing out his last breath. Or something like that.

    Might have to leave out that part if I play it with ten year olds though :tongue:
  • There are other Levity games of this kind, in the Fast games menu, that are well suited to play with kids. As you see, the ritual here goes well with the royal theme.
  • edited November 2018
    There are other Levity games of this kind, in the Fast games menu, that are well suited to play with kids. As you see, the ritual here goes well with the royal theme.
    I’m gonna have to read into them! I think I once read the one with the candle, but 20-30 minute games are perfect in time for class play for me (as we’ve got 50 minutes total, including going from and to another classroom/the courtyard.)
  • I like the simplicity of this game, the structured back-and-forth which leads players to (quite naturally) build on each other's contributions, and the effective format. Nice!
  • I like the simplicity of this game, the structured back-and-forth which leads players to (quite naturally) build on each other's contributions, and the effective format. Nice!
    Thanks! Re-reading it myself I notice all my spelling mistakes and stuff. Dangit. Whelp, gonna have to spellcheck before I reformat it and make it pretty.
  • Another thought:

    It could be interesting to have a number of categories or prompts to inspire narration.

    The most natural place to go, in my opinion, is "What's wrong with the Kingdom?"

    Starting from "War" produces something very different from "Poverty" or "Encroaching Desert".

    This gives the players something to respond to when they imagine their hero.

    e.g.

    The court says, "I remember. At that time, we were facing a crisis of faith in the kingdom."

    Then the player introduces their hero, using that as context.

  • Yeah, I had been thinking of fleshing things out with prompts some more, since pure improv can be really hard. I did it a bit with the hero’s background, but then the story pattern just fell into place so I typed that out. But I like the specific idea you have!

    Of course, the story about David has a specific background which my (board) gaming group, which is people from church, would be pretty familiar with. The heroes flocked to David when he was being chased around by king Saul. David had been annointed king by the prophet Samuel, but he hadn’t been crowned yet, and he had no intention of forcefully taking the kingdom for himself, scolding the heroes around him that wanted to try and do that. But yeah, I could look into the parts of David’s life when he collected his heroes.

    There’s his days as an outcast king between the outcasts, there’s his days as a mercenary fighter for the Philistines when staying in Israel was too dangerous, there’s the time he lived in Saul’s court and had to calm him down with music. Perhaps he could have already inspired people when he was still a shepherd?

    Anyway, thanks! That’s useful feedback! Not sure when I’ll be able to get back to it, but it’s in my notes on my iPad and I’ve got 90 minute commutes, so I’ll probably get to it at some point, but I can’t give it high priority at the moment.
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