(I dreamt I played) SHOTGUN WIZARD

This is all true and not just me trying to be clever:)

I had a melatonin-fueled fever dream last might; I was in a city where muppets were real, and they made houses out of giant oscillating fans. But that's not the important part. I played a game called SHOTGUN WIZARD.

Yes, it was all in caps. That was important for some reason.

I think it was an OSR style game, little pamphlet rule books with no art. They looked like the Traveller books a bit.

I can't remember anything about the game mechanics. It was a 1880s style western, like Deadlands, but the characters were Wizards. I think Wizards were lawmen, like Texas Rangers.

The Wizards had guns, of course.

Then there was a storm and I had to get on a boat and my dogs kept running away and it was pretty terrible.

I woke with two immediate thoughts: 1: No more melatonin and 2: I need to create this game...

Comments

  • Sounds solid to me. If it's party-based and challenge-oriented, it might be interesting if instead of the usual adventure paradigm you did explicit missions, as befits wizard-marshals. For example, the players could manage a wizard-marshal headquarters that sends their characters to ride specific circuits among the frontier settlements. This would then form the framework for determining where and when the party goes, with implications for what sort of trouble they end up in. Some circuits are more suited to more experienced marshals, of course, due to more dangerous wilderness or the nature of the settlements involved in it. Unlike a dungeon, you can of course repeat a circuit, and doing that is a big part of campaign play - maybe a given marshal or party is stuck riding the same circuit until they amass enough merit to be promoted to a more important and challenging route.

    Presumably the in-character ultimate goal is to become the Archmarshal who gets to stick around the HQ and manage the outriding marshal corps. Or, maybe you just betray the corps when the opportunity knocks and turn rogue for riches or magical power or whatnot.

    I suppose wizard-marshals should also like magical research and stuff. I wonder when they have time for that. Maybe this whole marshal business is something they are forced to do to pay off their student loans. So character generation has choices like whether you're coming from an Ivy League school but are on the hook for 8 years of marshal service, or if your grubby-but-cheap schooling means that you only have to do 2 years before being permitted to get out.
  • Every wizard knows the laws of magic. And if you break them, they'll be coming for you.
  • It makes sense that, in a setting where magic exists, wizards would be the law. That seems to be the core idea, and it's a good one. Those Who Can Wield Magic Are The Law (symbolized in the shotgun), your characters are Those Who Can Wield Magic, so now you just have to figure out what the game does with that. A Dogs hack is a possibility of course, but I don't think that would be particularly interesting in this case.
  • Sounds like Rifts New West.
  • I played a lot of Dogs in the day, so that was probably a major subliminal inspiration. And Rifts New West was my favorite Rifts book back in High School a million years ago. So that all fits!

    Euro, I love the idea of adding a HQ management layer. Maybe we've got bounties coming in, added to the bounty board, gotta ride your circuit and see how many bounties you can fit in between the day to day responsibilities of the circuit.

    That's a nice tie in to OLD old school dnd, where you memorized spells 'in town' before you headed out to the dungeon.

    Gear up at HQ, ride out, try not to run out of arcane resources before you complete the circuit. Maybe hit a few bounties along the way.
  • Eero, I really don't know why, but it might be the circuits, HQ management and mostly "Or, maybe you just betray the corps when the opportunity knocks and turn rogue for riches or magical power or whatnot." but for me this sounds like a re-skinning of the board game Dead of Winter. The HQ would replace the colony and the circuits would replace the locations and the rest seems just like an insane amount of work to do. Guess an RPG makes more sense then :-)
  • I'd also think you could reskin Blades in the Dark for a lot of this: the HQ management, the mission planning, the patrols and so on.
  • I'd also think you could reskin Blades in the Dark for a lot of this: the HQ management, the mission planning, the patrols and so on.

    . Totally agree!
  • edited October 2018
    Jacob said:

    I was in a city where muppets were real, and they made houses out of giant oscillating fans. But that's not the important part.

    OR IS IT???

    I will now never be satisfied to play a gun-toting wizard unless muppets are involved somehow. As NPCs to be protected, as vile antagonists, as supreme beings watching the human drama unfold -- whatever, but they need to be there. Trust your subconscious!

    Maybe watch Dark Crystal and take some more melatonin...
  • @James_Mullens when I read the OP, I was thinking Ghost Lines (x DitV).
  • The natural question that occurs to me is when do you use bullets and when magic? One answer would be that bullets cannot harm the demons of the waste, and it is forbidden to harm humans with magic. Of course, magic can still be creatively employed in dealing with outlaws.

    So our sheriffs deal with crimes both natural and supernatural. What of the latter? In addition to outlaws and suchlike, we also have rogue wizards (who have killed a man with their sorceries - or done worse) and the aforementioned demons. I'm thinking that these aren't generic D&D-esque monsters, but are probably always in some way human themselves - the results of thaumaturgical experiments gone awry, or aberrant sin, or somesuch. (Attendant are the themes of redemption/revenge for these sorry souls, and whether it really is okay to use magic on them).

    If you kill someone with magic then you are now a rogue wizard. What happens next?
  • The natural question that occurs to me is when do you use bullets and when magic? One answer would be that bullets cannot harm the demons of the waste, and it is forbidden to harm humans with magic. Of course, magic can still be creatively employed in dealing with outlaws.

    Yes, I like that.

    Also, no reason why guns need to be cheap and omnipresent in the setting. Perhaps wizards (or government) have clapped down on them successfully since the beginning, and guns simply are something that only wizard-marshals and serious criminals possess. Essentially, guns are considered magic wands, part of the wizard's natural shtick.
  • So wait, the wild west with strict gun controls? That's weirder than demonspawn. :P
  • edited October 2018
    here are my dumb, semi-not Zen immediate thoughts

    MAGIC. as a wizard-marshal, you don't wave your hands like some kind of yellow-bellied coward. you shoot your spells. your slugs and shells are, well, the ammunition for your magic - the delivery method for all your magic. even healing spells. certain types of cartridges are better suited for casting certain types of magic, however. so like. don't shoot a fireball with a sphereshot shell, ya dink.

    The natural question that occurs to me is when do you use bullets and when magic? One answer would be that bullets cannot harm the demons of the waste, and it is forbidden to harm humans with magic. Of course, magic can still be creatively employed in dealing with outlaws.

    Yes, I like that.

    Also, no reason why guns need to be cheap and omnipresent in the setting. Perhaps wizards (or government) have clapped down on them successfully since the beginning, and guns simply are something that only wizard-marshals and serious criminals possess. Essentially, guns are considered magic wands, part of the wizard's natural shtick.
    although i wrote my post's draft like about two days ago i think. yes. i agree with this.
  • I was thinking about this a bit today in the forest. Some setting notes emerged for what amounts to a xianxia western. (Yeah, the xianxia bit is random inspiration.) This is for OSR D&D the way I grok it (a refereed wargame, essentially):

    As a bonus feature, I would totally expect this stuff to be usable for a magic school campaign of some sort, too.

    The Manifold Frontier

    The current age began when wizards on the prime material plane went full xianxia with their arts, congregating into mountain strongholds that slowly went on to... become the only thing that actually matters in the world? The hierarchy of immortal wizards leaves mortals largely to their own, except for the Arcane Tithe, consisting of the most essential part of the world's bounty, the magical bit. The combination of monastic cultivation, the occasional vigorous wizarding war, and ambitious use of the Tithe proved a winning combination for developing a society of immortal magicians largely detached from mortal concerns.

    Although the Arcane Orders did not intend it, the discovery of the Manifold Gate a thousand years back has slowly turned them into a world government of sorts: the Gate connects the Prime Material into an ascending multiverse full of magical resources that have slowly become paramount to continuing cultivation of the magical arts. Each world in the manifold sequence seems to provide greater rewards in the form of rare and powerful magical reagents, which in turn enables wizards to push their arts to new heights.

    The implication has been that the originally reclusive Arcane Orders have been forced to oversee a great colonization project as the wizards initiate farming, mining, hunting initiatives in higher worlds. Mundane workforce is used in the main, but while they are loyal and easy to compensate, the mundies are also generally rather frail, which necessitates wizard oversight. The higher manifolds teem with dangerous monsters, after all.

    The Arcane Orders today retain nominal autonomy from each other, but in truth the most important part of the arcane government is the Gate Authority they formed centuries ago to provide security to interplanar colonization. The Authority concerns itself with oversight of planar magic (itself dangerous to the fabric of reality) and exploration, but its most important function is to provide law and order to the colonies: insofar as the mundane colonists of the Manifold Frontier are concerned, the Gate Authority is their government.

    The Manifold Frontier today consists of eight Manifolds, each an entire world, even if generally not well-explored; the population totals several millions. The Manifolds are accessed in sequence, and generally grow more hostile the higher (lower?) the wizards explore. The first four manifolds, as well as the Prime Material Plane, feature "territories" the Gate Authority is authorized to police on behalf of the fractitious Arcane Orders. The higher Manifolds are in the process of exploration and are not settled enough to justify territory status. There is at least one Manifold more, but the level of native hostility and conceptual threat has so far prevented successful exploration beyond the Eight Manifold.
  • Character Creation

    Player characters are wizard-marshals, serving members of the Gate Authority. Most are members of recognized Arcane Orders, most are on a limited service tour with the Gate Authority to pay off their apprenticeship. Most are human, young and trained to some degree as military police, but there are exceptions.

    Character backgrounds, everybody gets one:

    Prime Elite: The character is a member of the mundane (non-arcane, that is) elites on the Prime Material Plane. Their wealth and influence has bought them entry into one of the Arcane Orders, and thus they've become a wizard despite the lack of particularly outstanding talent. Remember, the wizards often under-estimate the mundane. Advantages: Independent, established position outside the Arcane Orders; great wealth and/or other mundane resources; practical perspective and lack of wizard blind spots. Disadvantages: Mediocre talent; mundane ties.

    Arcane Clan: The character is a member of an established wizard family who share secrets and train their kin. A lesser clan implies less support and respect, but more leeway, while an old and strong clan will expect more of their members. Advantages: A fully-formed service package of clan magics that should suffice for marshaling; inherited talent; social stature in the wizarding world; clan support in crisis situations. Disadvantages: Clan agenda complicates service; ancestral enemies.

    Self-Made Talent: The character was born with nothing, but their inborn magical talent attracted one of the Arcane Orders at an early age. The character owes everything they have to the Order, which will continue to press their demands long after service with the Gate Authority is over and done with. Advantages: Superior talent as a wizard. Disadvantages: Lack of respect in the Orders; service duty lasts until you make Archmage grade or Rogue out.

    Manifold Born: The character has been born on the 2nd Manifold, a world that is sufficiently far away from the Prime Material Plane that humans raised there are essentially part spirit-beings. Manifold families are by definition mundane, but being a half-spirit makes one a desirable apprentice for many Arcane Orders. Advantages: Natural 2 HD; bullshit elf advantages; natural magic. Disadvantages: Racism; vulnerability to certain magics.

    Wandering Wizard: The character is a PC adventurer - they originate outside the Arcane Orders, having been trained as a wizard by undefined parties, and just decided to join the Gate Authority one day on a lark. They passed the rigorous tests and were accepted as a wizard-marshal despite having no Order affiliation. Mediocre players should actually pick this one, as it's easiest to play competently. Advantages: None, but maybe your background comes into focus later. Disadvantages: Suspicion of the Order wizards.

    Everybody also gets a character class, which also indicates the Arcane Order the character comes from. There are other classes in the setting aside from various wizards, but they're weaker and less respected and you don't get to be a wizard-marshal without being a wizard, duh.

    Vancian Arcanist: The traditional D&D wizard with its spell magic, leveled slots and so on. There are a couple of major Orders on the Prime Material Plane for this type of magic, and several lesser ones, too, as it's a flexible and interesting platform when you take into account all the skulduggery that designers have been doing with it over the years. Arcanists generally specialize in specific spell lists and magical styles and so on, but they have theoretical access to just about any D&D caster class out there. (Divine magic, too; for our purposes they're the same thing.)

    Xianxia Cultivator: Or the "Monk", except more of a kungfu wizard. They get a mana pool magic system, think Exalted. Generally slower to gain new magic tricks than a Vancian Arcanist, but the tricks are powerful and rather flexible. Core concepts include things like elementally aligned body meridians, secret arts that put the qi to use - Chinese high fantasy stuff.

    The Arcanist and Cultivator are, to my mind, the Yin and Yang of the class system, the two most common staple classes. A big part of the campaign is exploring how slot-based magic and mana pool magic work side by side, both backed by a powerful and varied culture of ideas and variety; there's plenty of ways to fine-tune either to reveal new twists to the magic system. However, there is more - check this out:

    Implement Operator: Or "gun wizard", as one might call them. Or "artificer", as they're traditionally called in most Arcanist traditions. It's not really a magical tradition in the sense of boasting a 10 000 year history, but ever since the Gate Authority itself started a small pseudo-Order to train them, they're technically official. Most Implement Operators nevertheless come from established Arcanist and Cultivator Orders, where it's considered a lesser art taken up by the nerd losers who can't hack demon summoning. As one might imagine, the Gate Authority trains its implement operators as gun-fu bad-asses, but the class works fine in support role as well.

    There might be some other character classes in the setting, too, but that's what I've got so far.
  • About the power level of the campaign

    This campaign totally needs to start at a higher power level than OSR D&D generally operates in; we want the beginning wizard-marshal to already have a magical paradigm of some sort. However, my own brain damage considers free level-ups to be the tool of the devil, so instead of saying that everybody starts on fifth level I'll just say that the nature of wizard training in this world means that 1st level wizards actually start with a pretty reasonable load-out of capabilities.

    Putting this into Vancian terms (I'm not writing down the other magic systems right now, after all), what we want is for characters to possess a standard wizard-marshal spellbook on top of their background-granted advantages; this spellbook includes a bunch of spells, all 1st level, that taken together make the trained wizard-marshal a respectable gunslinger from the start. Probably some shielding spells, targeting stuff, whatever.

    I would also grant Vancian wizards in this campaign more flex on the prep, stuff like having spells cast outside combat conditions not count for spell slots expended, and so on. The goal is to retain the basic facts of being a 1st level wizard while upping the practical power-level, but also retaining the dramatic ramp-up in power that leveling grants. In practical terms we want that 1st level wizard to be able to go into a surprise shootdown with mundies and live; to be able to prep for a high noon confrontation and come out the winner against the best that the mundane world has to offer; to still have some room for the start of a personalized magic paradigm in their build.

    What's the deal with the guns

    Guns are rare on the Prime Material Plane, but they were a sort of up-and-coming technology around the time the Gate Authority really got going, and their head Judge at the time really took to them - the fine fellow was a diviner of some sort and probably foresaw how much of a game-changer the gun could be.

    So what happened is that the Gate Authority not only discouraged gun development on the Prime, but they also instituted a ban on guns on the Manifold Frontier while also arming its own budding peace corps with them. A gun is, after all, a rather handy thing for most low-level wizards to have. It didn't take long for the gun to become the institutional symbol of the Gate Authority, which further cemented their commitment to it. They've even started training wizards "gun first" over the last few decades.

    A gun-wielding wizard has the advantage of being able to expend their limited magical potential in non-offensive ways, which is simply a good idea when you stop to think about it: magic is not very good at killing things, when all's said and done. A wizard-marshal is much more likely to pack defensive magic, movement magic and flexible utility stuff than some energy strike thing that does exactly what a bullet would.

    Of course, experienced wizards with a career in the Gate Authority will often end up specializing their magic around the firearm. Depends on what your goals in life are; many wizards don't really worship the gun so much as to let its foibles determine their magical development. Those who nevertheless do are, of course, the legends of the marshal service.

    "Magic reload" is a 1st level Vancian spell, by the way. "Phantom Gun" is 3rd level, and it fires magic bullets. The Gate Authority takes a dim view on members who are blatant about sharing gun lore with others (even their own Arcane Orders).

    Gunfighting Rules

    Some thoughts on OSR compatible gunfighting rules. I'm assuming 19th century gun tech, of course. Remember that hit point damage in D&D does not indicate concrete injury so much as dramatic close shaves of various sorts.

    A trained gunfighter attacks as per the normal paradigm against enemy AC (armor protects against guns, in other words). They declare shot type (single, double-tap, spray, etc.) as part of their action. Reloading the gun takes a turn.

    A successful hit with a gun deals HP damage per bullet and a save against shock. A failed save indicates that the shot was effective in concretely hitting or scaring the target; they go to ground and might lose their next action to hesitation and/or pain (unless immune to fear, of course).

    A hit on armor (against "touch AC" as 3rd edition D&D calls it) causes either half damage or one point of damage depending on gun size vs. armor hardness: soft armor suffices to minimize small weapons fire, plate armor is needed for rifles and such. Either case still risks a shock save, though.

    The real advantages in gunfighting come from the concepts of cover and aim: characters in cover gain a hefty AC bonus, while characters with time to aim get a hefty bonus to hit. The goal is to encourage a gunfight dynamic where fighters seek cover, lines of fire, enfilade and all that good shit.

    Wizard-marshals encounter a lot of enemies that do not have guns or equivalent, too. I have faith that the gun's range, quickness and shock effect suffice to make your standard D&D swordsman-in-armor a manageable threat. I don't want to just say that armor and melee are irrelevant; rather, the goal should be to make it a waning paradigm that may still kill the unwary. People in the Frontier have a lot of swords.
  • Campaign stuff

    The campaign starts with the first batch of PCs (OSR game, remember) being inducted as wizard-marshals. They are assigned to either the Prime Material Plane or the 1st Manifold to begin with, depending on where the Gate Authority needs marshals. Assignments are generally indefinite in length, you only get reassigned for good reasons.

    The campaign goals are as per D&D: make something of yourself. Unlike standard D&D, however, we're part of a powerful law-keeping organization. The PCs are of course afforded all the freedom they need to make asses of themselves, but generally speaking your character doesn't get to choose their own missions: lawful orders must be obeyed, or your wizard risks censure.

    (In the OSR spirit it is of course possible to get out of the initial campaign premise. Each character has a defined length of their tour of duty, for instance, after which they can get out of the GA and go do some more usual wizard stuff in the Prime or one of the Manifolds. Or, you could defect. Whatever, strategic freedom is the point.)

    The newly minted wizard-marshals are introduced to their local Manifold HQ and assigned into teams to take up their duties. PCs of course get to be a team, but maybe they get a veteran marshal to help out on their first Circuit Ride.

    The strategic picture needs a map, by the way. I envision having one map of each plane (Prime Material included) that marks the major points of interest. The Manifold HQ Admin (the local GA boss) uses the map to draw and define the Circuits, the routes that the wizard-marshals take over the frontier as they perform their duties. There are rarely enough marshals to assign them permanently to an individual city; it is likelier that a given team of marshals is responsible for a larger Circuit that takes several weeks of travel to cover.

    All Manifold maps have the following features, at least:
    * The HQ is usually situated in the largest civilian population center in the Manifold. This is usually a place with some importance to wizard economy, of course.
    * The Descending Gate is the magical portal to the next lower Manifold (or the Prime Material in the case of the 1st Manifold). The Gate location is permanently guarded by the Gate Authority's border forces to prevent monsters from overrunning the lower planes, of course. Because the Gate's location is determined by planar geomancy, it's rarely conveniently right next to the HQ.
    * Similarly, the Ascending Gate is also out there somewhere, on the other side of the map. It is also guarded, so each Gate actually has two border commands (lower and upper), one on each side.
    * Any other official settlements. "Official" means that the settlement is under the ward of the GA, and thus part of some Circuit.
    * Known Monster Lairs, Rogue settlements and other points of interest.

    The basic Circuits on each Manifold are the routes between the Manifold HQ and the two gates, of course; the marshals are responsible for securing the tradeways, after all. Other Circuits available on each Manifold depend on the state of its colonization. On Prime Material Plane the duties are a bit different, as the marshals mainly provide security services and extra muscle to the Arcane Orders, but whatever.

    About the Manifolds

    The Manifolds are colorful worlds, each with their own environmental theme, of course. They're also power scaling in two different ways:
    * The basic flora and fauna of each Manifold is so dramatic and powerful that anybody living their life on the plane ends up leveling to a minimum HD equivalent to the Manifold level, or dying. All commoners on Manifold three have 3 HD, in other words. The common man on Prime is 0th level with 1 HD, of course, as usual.
    * The Gate Authority has a long-standing policy of attempting to match wizard-marshals to fitting duties. This means that characters and teams are generally assigned to more distant realms if they level up in the performance of their duties. A character one level over may be instead assigned team leader in critical duties; a character two levels over is made HQ Admin or moved to a higher Manifold.

    As for the individual Manifolds, I envision as follows:

    1st is very similar to the Prime Material plane on first glance, except everything is more vivacious, and there are Faeries and similar near-benign spirit beings in there. No natives aside from the spirits, really. Feywild, pretty much. At night the place grows extra dangerous as nightmares come out, though, so it has a bit of a bite appropriate for 1st level adventures. The GA has extensive farming operations here; much of the Frontier, and particularly the trade route, is fed by the produce. Rogues (people from the Prime who abandon the Gate Authority) are most common here, as the Manifold is at least as large as the Prime Material Plane, meaning that there's a huge outer fringe outside the colonized portions of the world available for people to escape in.

    2nd and up become progressively more exotic and dangerous. I don't really have an opinion on their theming - maybe just steal the world theming from SMB3, in which case 2nd would be the Sand World. The one overriding theme is that the higher we go, the more hostile the native populations are, and the more actively they are guided and empowered by the Other towards which the Manifold Frontier is clearly progressing. It's sort of obvious that there is some end to the Frontier, and it's probably not just a Pacific Ocean.
  • edited October 2018
    @Comeau: that as exactly my thinking! Why 'shotgun wizard' instead of 'revolver wizard' (with the obvious answer: it was a silly dream)?

    Shotgun shells are easy to make.

    Maybe magic in this setting is exclusively ritual magic (draw a circle, light some candles, chant some words) and alchemy. Shotgun shells would be a convenient method to deliver a magical concoction at 1600 feet per second.

    Part of the game would be making sure you have the right shells to take on the right monsters, sort of like the potions in the Witcher games.

    So a wizard-marshal carries a revolver to use against human foes and a shotgun to use against monsters. I'm picturing a short two barrel gun for easy reloading and swapping shells.

    And they also have a repertoire of rituals to used to ward buildings, hold the hungry dead at bay, heal the sick, scry from a distance, contact the FAR REALMS, etc. Utility magic.

  • Wow @Eero_Tuovinen. That's amazing!
  • I definitely want to play this. The title alone is (*chef kiss*) perfect.

    I love the idea of enchanted/alchemical shotgun shells, with different effects suited to different foes & situations. What if you could only use your magic shotgun(s) for fighting, and all other magic was defensive/utility spells for puzzles/exploration/social interaction?
  • Jacob said:


    Maybe magic in this setting is exclusively ritual magic (draw a circle, light some candles, chant some words) and alchemy. Shotgun shells would be a convenient method to deliver a magical concoction at 1600 feet per second.

    Part of the game would be making sure you have the right shells to take on the right monsters, sort of like the potions in the Witcher games.

    So a wizard-marshal carries a revolver to use against human foes and a shotgun to use against monsters. I'm picturing a short two barrel gun for easy reloading and swapping shells.

    And they also have a repertoire of rituals to used to ward buildings, hold the hungry dead at bay, heal the sick, scry from a distance, contact the FAR REALMS, etc. Utility magic.

    absolutely this. although i like shooting too.
    DBB said:

    I definitely want to play this. The title alone is (*chef kiss*) perfect.

    I love the idea of enchanted/alchemical shotgun shells, with different effects suited to different foes & situations. What if you could only use your magic shotgun(s) for fighting, and all other magic was defensive/utility spells for puzzles/exploration/social interaction?

    while i'm not opposed to other magic not using shotguns, healing shotguns are a beautiful idea in my opinion. Hell, even beyond that:
    scrying. you shoot yourself in the eyeballs while thinking really hard about the person/thing you want to scry.
    charm person. you shoot little pink flechettes into them, which harmlessly dissolve into their soft Muppet tissues and produce the charm effect.
    teleport. your tightly packed pellets scatter your material being as they fly, landing you where they may. possibly includes horrific Muppet telefragging.
  • I like it! Maybe rituals can be used for any non-instant magic, but if you wanna cast a spell FAST you use a magical shotgun shell.

    I love the idea of a healing shotgun blast to the face.
  • So when I get a crazy idea like this, I try and think of the opposite of that thing. If this thing were a story, the opposite might trigger something. It doesn't have to be a source of drama/conflict, but it might be.

    It reminds me a bit of how Rob Schrab makes t-shirts, for movies that should exist, like Shark Motel, Ballerina Overdrive and Wizard Vigilante.

    https://www.teepublic.com/t-shirt/1515686-wizard-vigilante-design-2?store_id=136697



  • Also, no reason why guns need to be cheap and omnipresent in the setting. Perhaps wizards (or government) have clapped down on them successfully since the beginning, and guns simply are something that only wizard-marshals and serious criminals possess. Essentially, guns are considered magic wands, part of the wizard's natural shtick.

    Once upon a time I invented a D&D magic item to tempt players with: a "shotgun" with holding "barrels" and triggers that could be loaded with several magic wands, allowing non-wizard characters to activate wands and enabling simultaneous use of multiple wands.

    "Unfortunately" I only provided plentiful wands of wonder (a traditional D&D item that causes random powerful and dangerous effects) to load these shotguns with, and innocent bystanders started to die...
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