Era: The Chosen - Story-driven Horror RPG

edited August 2018 in Story Games
Hi everyone!

Ed here, from Shades of Vengeance.

We've created a brand new game - two years in the making - with the aim of bringing you something a little different and interesting in the Horror genre.

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This game features a rich and diverse setting, with the opportunity to play in Renaissance times, in the Victorian era or jump into the modern world. In all, you face the Anonassi - terrifying creatures from another dimension.

The mechanics feature Terror and Trophies - a new addition to the Era d10 Rule Set (Era: The Consortium, Era: The Empowered, Era: Lyres), which allow your exploits and adventures to have a mechanical effect on your character: positive, negative, or even both!

Please consider checking it out if it sounds interesting!
Era: The Chosen Kickstarter (Now a Staff Pick!)

Comments

  • How the system works?
  • edited August 2018
    How the system works?
    I looked it up:

    The rules could be described as “a Success-counting dice pool system where you roll Attribute + Skill in d10s and the difficulty of the task determines which numbers count as Successes.

    So basically, the system is the same as any mainstream RPG, with very little, if any, difference.
  • Thanks! How would these work?

    allow your exploits and adventures to have a mechanical effect on your character: positive, negative, or even both!
  • Ed engaged me in a discussion about the Eras system here.

    Since shortly thereafter, it's been nothing from him on S-G but drive-by posting to advertise subsequent Eras games. @James_Stuart mentioned that deletions and/or bans might be forthcoming.
  • edited August 2018
    Actually, @David_Berg, I have finally got notifications working properly! So I am now aware of what's going on here.

    But if banning / deletion is the intention, I understand. I was previously having trouble finding threads again, and whether they had any replies was something I was not sure about... I'm hoping to improve on that now that it's a little clearer.
  • edited August 2018
    How the system works?
    I looked it up:

    The rules could be described as “a Success-counting dice pool system where you roll Attribute + Skill in d10s and the difficulty of the task determines which numbers count as Successes.

    So basically, the system is the same as any mainstream RPG, with very little, if any, difference.
    Well, if that's your opinion, that's fine. I think that taking the basic description of the setting and assuming that is probably a little misrepresentative. The devil is in the details, right?

    I'd recommend downloading the Quickstart Guide for one of our games, if you feel that the system is worth a closer look.

    I'd recommend you look at the stuff that relates to Combat, as that holds a fair amount of interesting quirks which resolve some of the problems with this style of system, for example.

    That aside, any game which uses dice is going to follow one of three or four broad paths - even the Edge of Empire system which uses unique set of dice basically does very little differently. So yes, this is a game which uses dice. If that automatically means it's derivative in your eyes... it's probably not for you!
  • edited August 2018
    Thanks! How would these work?

    allow your exploits and adventures to have a mechanical effect on your character: positive, negative, or even both!
    I don’t know but based on the other discriptions of the mechanics it will likely be quite mainstream and predictable and won’t be as narratively focused or consequential as it would be in most indie games. If you like mostly traditional RPGs it may be a good fit, but I wouldn’t expect an untraditional approach.

    I’m not sure if it is the case here, but many times these types of games think there doing something really novel and new and effective, because the author(s) have only been exposed to varianrs of popular mainstream games and don’t know much about what has been accomplished in design outside of that space, and their solutions aren’t very deep or innovative. That said, I want to stress that I’m not sure if that is the case here, I don’t know much about the game and I’m only basing this on the other design elements described—who knows, perhaps it causes a major shift in gameplay and narrative focus and it does so in a innovative, interesting way?
  • Thanks! How would these work?

    allow your exploits and adventures to have a mechanical effect on your character: positive, negative, or even both!
    So these work through the Terror and Trophies rules, which were created specifically for this game.

    I go into it in a fair amount of detail on this podcast, but here's the short version:

    Terrors are caused by various unpleasant events which the characters encounter.
    Perhaps they lost their teammate to a Kapavuk and had to watch as the monster devoured alive a friend they had known for years. Perhaps they were almost eaten by an Udzeni and barely escaped alive, leaving them fearful of the idea that they may be eaten again.
    To gain a Terror in the first place is usually very easy (and at the GM’s Discretion, whenever something unpleasant happens to the character!). Managing it is significantly more difficult: it will often come back to haunt the character at the worst possible moments.
    No matter what the reason, whenever they end up in a similar situation again, they will be required to roll a Willpower Check. If they fail, they will be given the Horror Status.
    - The first attempt will be at the standard 7 Threshold.
    - If they succeed, the second attempt will be at an 8 Threshold.
    - If they succeed, all further attempts will be at a 9 Threshold.
    If they fail three times in a single encounter, they will gain a point of Terror.
    When a character has 10 points of Terror, they must be returned to Aether and treated… or locked away. They may never recover, and that character is considered lost to the fight for ever!

    Trophies are the opposite: they provide an opportunity for the character to remember past challenges they have overcome and draw strength from that memory.
    Although these usually affect the Terror checks in certain situations, that’s at the GM’s Discretion - they may have other effects, such as boosting Strength when fighting a certain enemy, for example.
    Most commonly, they will prevent the Chosen from gaining Terrors from certain sources. For example, if they overcame a Brute by killing it during a charge, they may no longer fear being charged, thanks to their Brute’s Tooth Trophy.
    Alternatively, they may reduce the impact of a Terror, removing it from effect. For example, the character may be afraid of being eaten, but the Udzeni tentacle they wear as a scarf reminds them that Udzeni can be defeated, even from inside their mouth!
  • Thx I will check it out.
  • edited August 2018
    I don’t know but based on the other discriptions of the mechanics it will likely be quite mainstream and predictable and won’t be as narratively focused or consequential as it would be in most indie games. If you like mostly traditional RPGs it may be a good fit, but I wouldn’t expect an untraditional approach.

    I’m not sure if it is the case here, but many times these types of games think there doing something really novel and new and effective, because the author(s) have only been exposed to mainstream games and don’t know much about what has been accomplished in design outside of that space, and their solutions aren’t very deep or innovative. That said, I want to stress that I’m not sure if that is the case here, I don’t know much about the game and I’m only basing this on the other design elements described—who knows, perhaps it causes a major shift in gameplay and narrative focus and it does so in a innovative, interesting way?
    I don't ever recall claiming to have invented something that could not have been made before.

    That is an extremely negative comment to make on a game which you know absolutely nothing about, by your own admission, however. Taking the time to deride something even you admit you didn't bother to look into first? Classy.

    If interesting rulesets are your entire focus for gaming, I probably don't make games that would would be interested in, because I'm much more interested in finding a rule set which facilitates fun and provides players with the freedom to do what they want than creating niggly little mechanics that slow it down but are "unique". That's fine if you do! There's nothing wrong with that type of game, it's just not the type of game I make.
  • It looks very trad. The character sheet for Consortiom looks super complex but interesting.
  • edited August 2018
    The character sheet for Consortiom looks super complex but interesting.
    Thanks very much. It's not really as complex as it seems at first glance. There are some "how play works videos" around... here's one for Chosen:


    It's certainly not a "no rules" kind of game, and it does follow more traditional lines in terms of the way play proceeds. That said, the entire rules in the Core Rulebook are 40 pages in length, including combat, grappling, any kind of skill checks, etc... so they aren't to extensive and hard to learn.

    More videos, including an ongoing podcast, are available on our YouTube Channel!
  • edited August 2018

    Well, if that's your opinion, that's fine. I think that taking the basic description of the setting and assuming that is probably a little misrepresentative. The devil is in the details, right?
    Yes, you make a good point. Sorry for being dismissive and for making assumptions, and sorry for being rude. Sometimes people come to these forums who never participate in them and spam advertisements of their games and it can rub me the wrong way if I’m feeling crabby. When designers do this, especially if it is excessive, it is also considered rude and I acted in kind but admittedly disproportionately. Having added that caveat, you are right that my comment was overly negative and I shouldn’t have addressed your game that way or stereotyped it.

    The reason mentioning whether or not a game is doing something different or not is relevant is because the primary types of games most people are interested in on these forums are games that do something significantly different in terms of design. Most people on these forums are designers and most of the games we discuss are indie games that do things different from other games. Designers come to these forums and spam their games without knowing who the target audience is; this is a common occurrence.

    I agree with the fact that EOE does very little that’s different. That was one of the things I was attempting to get at. A game like EOE isn’t a good example of an outlier or a unique game. EOE is a traditional, mainstream, phys-simulationist game that borrows a bit of old, indie, narrativist design tech. It’s almost necessarily derivative because phys-simulationist games are those that constitute the vast majority or RPGs, are currently and historically by far the most widely played, and have been iterated upon for 47 years. I was pointing out that your game is likely a mainstream in that it is seemed to be mainly a phys-simulationist game—which there’s nothing wrong with, these types of games are fun and I play them all the time—but because of this it will likely be typical of that game design style and won’t take much of a narrative design approach, but will likely augment the phys-situationist design by building upon it with similar design tech. Of course that was only based on what I had read about the system that your game was built upon and then checking out the Kickstarter and I could be totally wrong. But it would be a point of interest and distinction to many members and that was the purpose of making it. Also, narrativist RPGs and Story Games arn’t about “niggly little mechanics that slow [a game] down,” they have almost without exception much simpler mechanics than mainstream RPGs. They are unique but not for some arbitrary reason, or for the sake of being unique. The are designed to create a different type of game that has a different focus than your typical mainstream game. The link below gives a good description of what makes Story Games unique if you’re interested:
    https://www.google.com/amp/s/heterogenoustasks.wordpress.com/2016/01/12/what-is-a-storygame/amp/

    Anyway, I really will check out the game design documents that you included above to check out your design’s details. If your game’s design is appealing to me, I’ll back it. Good luck on your kickstarter.

  • I understand, and I agree that my conduct on this forum could appear negative to people who don't understand the circumstances around it - I'm pulled in a lot of different directions and rely on Email notifications from forums to answer questions, which weren't working for me on this one for whatever reason. I was therefore under the impression that no-one had ever bothered to ask questions or reply to my posts.

    I think that the Terror and Trophies offer a much more narrative impact within a narrative-driven but more simulationist game than you sound like you prefer. You might be pleasantly surprised. Please feel free to post if you have any questions.
  • edited August 2018

    I think that the Terror and Trophies offer a much more narrative impact within a narrative-driven but more simulationist game than you sound like you prefer. You might be pleasantly surprised. Please feel free to post if you have any questions.
    Cool, I will check them out. I like every type of RPG so the fact that it’s simulationist won’t be an issue if I’m into it. Cheers.

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