5e inventory sheet

edited July 2018 in Make Stuff!

So it looks like this:

5e inventory sheet

5e inventory sheet

and you download it here

Forget about weights. Clear your mind. This system replaces that with item slots of six different sizes. Tiny, small, ration, medium, big, and heavy.

  • Tiny for things you put in your pouch
  • Small for things you put in your bag
  • Medium for things you hang from your belt
  • Big for things you strap onto your bag

Rations are twice as big as small things. They're the only thing that's that size. Heavy is also an unusual size, only a few normal gear items count as that heavy, and they're listed on the sheet.

  1. List your strength, and ⅓ and ⅔ of it too.
  2. Check your encumbrance budget. One check mark tells you three things: your penalty (no penalty, just a little slower, or a lot slower and disadvantage on all strength, dex and con rolls), your current gear weight, and how many circles you can mark.
  3. Mark that many circles. You've already paid for them with the check mark, so just go ahead. The backpack costs a double circle, mark both. Armor can cost 0, 1, 2, 3 or 4 depending on type.
  4. Fill in your gear in the slots that you’ve gotten by marking circles.

Source code is here, improve it!

Comments

  • Nicely done! I like the clarity of it, the directions, the examples.

    The simpler sheets don't *help* you as much, that's all.

    I once saw a similar concept to your visual strength chart: however, instead of squares, what they did was to make little pieces of paper with drawings of various items. The heavier the item, the bigger the piece of paper.

    When you carried something, you would paste or place the cutouts with the pictures of the equipment on the sheet. If they could all fit, then you were ok! If not, you'd have to leave something behind.

  • Nicely done! I like the clarity of it, the directions, the examples.
    Much appreciated! Hopefully third time can be the charm for my attempts at making inventory sheets.
    The simpler sheets don't *help* you as much, that's all.
    Yeah, I think you've nailed it with that. The simpler sheets have implicit instructions in my own head and once I follow those instructions, there is less there on the paper to distract me from the numbers I actually need in play. But, you kind of need to think like me. A more guided sheet like this has fewer things to learn.
    I once saw a similar concept to your visual strength chart: however, instead of squares, what they did was to make little pieces of paper with drawings of various items. The heavier the item, the bigger the piece of paper.

    When you carried something, you would paste or place the cutouts with the pictures of the equipment on the sheet. If they could all fit, then you were ok! If not, you'd have to leave something behind.
    I really like that.
  • I like it! It's super cool.
  • I like it as well, very considerate work. I prefer less pre-constructed approaches (that is, I want the players to choose their own logistics system rather than feeding them one), but that looks pretty similar to something that I would choose as a player myself, if you get the distinction.
  • Thanks to both♥
    I want the players to choose their own logistics system rather than feeding them one
    Me too but if they don't do it, or if the one person who is good at doing it doesn't share, then now there is this.

    What the rest of us at the table wants to be able to query from any logistic system any given player chooses is
    1. what's your encumbrance level rn?
    2. can you [carry/be carried by] other people with their stuff, your stuff, both or neither?
    3. how much treasure do you leave behind in the dungeon?

    oddly enough out of all the weird schemes and notations various players have tried over the years it's surprisingly hard to get the answer to those three questions.

    And as beautiful and fun that that reddit one is, it isn't super good at answering the first two questions. It helps a little bit and that inspired me to do mine.

    But I'm gonna playtest this, maybe it also falls flat like some of my previous attempts. ABT♥ always be testing
  • Oh I forgot the point I wanted to say to you Eero: that yeah if someone wants to make their own with more detail & flexibilty they can. As long as they can reliably answer those three questions
  • Yeah, that's how it goes: you do what works for you, but you need to be able to answer the questions that encumbrance systems actually are for. I don't as a GM really care how the players arrive at their answers on something like this, aside from suggesting some best practices to get them started. The same goes for tracking light, water, food; whatever is the level to which the players want to do it, that's how they do it. It couldn't be otherwise, as I don't have the time as the GM to do the tracking for them.

    (In case anybody's wondering, this distribution of responsibilities does explicitly mean that children and casuals are practically exempt from logistics - if your answer to "can you do it?" is always affirmative, you never need to fail because of logistics. That's just fine with me, it's one of the ways in which the game scales down to an individual player's level of performance.)
  • Wow, your parenthesis preempted my barrage of questions!
  • edited April 2018

    The reason I don’t do the same is because this is a part of the game that I want to teach the casuals. (Unlike the charop stuff where I’m happy if they stay with The Searcher forever.)

    CW gory:

    The first OSR game I played in, the DM waved all of the encumbrance stuff and one guy put all the rib cages from every fallen foe in his pocket. He… did something with that later. :( That was the day I realized that yes encumbrance limits have their place. Before that day I had never seen it abused.

    I care about the inventory stuff because that’s something that the character would care about. They would rifle through their backpack looking for that flask of oil.

    That’s also why I like a list – a packing manifesto? Better than the square reddit slots or Tetris pieces of some of the other solutions I’ve looked at. When you’re writing a list you get away from the feeling of packing tiny little toy equipment. (Edit: Why can't I ever write about the differences between various systems without sniping at what ever isn't my currently caught fancy?)

  • And also if they want to carry each other's lifeless bodies (that... comes up a lot in D&D). What if a cash carries a nerd or the other way around? The nerd would want to know the weight of the cash's character and/or if they really would've been able to carry them. Interaction. Etc etc
  • Isn't that the typical DM's mind? That I wouldn't mind the characters having super simple SOTU-like characters (no annoying "options") but do like to emburden them with logistics? :tongue:
  • Started playtesting the sheet from this thread’s OP today!

    Very well received!

    Some problems, it did require explanation for sure.

    • The whole “you don’t need to care about precise weights for the small, medium and heavy things” was unclear and at first one player started listing in pound weights beside the boxes until I stopped him.
    • Also the fact that it’s actually not super clear how many stones you’re actually carrying. The backpack itself 2 stone, the tied-to-backpack 3 stone, then one stone for every three items on your body/belt/sheath etc, then pouches two per stone… That could be made visually clearer.
    • Also one PC could carry 11 stone with great difficulty, 6 stone with some difficulty and 3 stone easily. The way this sheet is set up, it was hard for him to get below 6 stone. Since there’s pretty much five stones that are hard to move right there w/ the backpack&tied-to-backpack.

    It’s still way more usable than anything we’ve tried before, including that reddit one. But I hope some inspiration for a version 2 comes along soon.♥

  • Working on v2
    I really wish pouches were 5 pounds instead of 6 pounds T_T
  • edited May 2018
    I made smaller pouches in my world helt enkelt sorry all you six pound pouch lovers out there
    Here is v2

    and since I updated the original post, here is the old version
  • Beautiful. I guess it is more or less usable with any system, thanks to the index in the lower right corner.
  • Thank you, DeReel, that means a lot
  • edited May 2018
    I like the idea of this sheet, combining simplified encumbrance lists with some focus on where the items are carried. Although I am still a little confused how the item sizes translate to stones. If I carry 1 big thing, is that 3 stones, the same as if I carry 5 big things?

    In terms of presentation, I find it just slightly confusing that when you read down the sheet, it goes small, then big, then medium. I expect big to be at the bottom. Although it is logical in terms of being backpack, then strapped to backpack, so maybe it is better how it is.
  • edited May 2018
    I like the idea of this sheet, combining simplified encumbrance lists with some focus on where the items are carried. Although I am still a little confused how the item sizes translate to stones. If I carry 1 big thing, is that 3 stones, the same as if I carry 5 big things?
    Oh, just yesterday before you posted this I updated it to have a little swapping guide where it says that if you carry 1 big+1 medium thing that's one stone, three are two and five are three. That isn't easy to grok but I wanted there to be a way to cut down some stone weight.
    In terms of presentation, I find it just slightly confusing that when you read down the sheet, it goes small, then big, then medium. I expect big to be at the bottom. Although it is logical in terms of being backpack, then strapped to backpack, so maybe it is better how it is.
    Yeah, that bugs me too. It was either going to be "medium, small, big" or "small, big, medium". Maybe I could turn it on it's side so that medium would be beside the backpack items. Somehow...
  • Ah, I see, down in the corner there. Gotcha.
  • I want to write that you can give up five rations to have an extra big thing for example.

    You'd make the inside of your backpack lighter in order to strap a big thing to the back of it instead.

    I'm always coming up with ideas on how to clarify / update the swapping guide. Kinda need to make a little script that helps me update/upload all versions of this this thing at once (png pdf svg).
  • I changed the text to have a Strapping guide in addition to a Swapping guide.
    Hmm why does my inventory sheet read like a seventies sex manual :blush:

    Someone told me yesterday that historically people have carried around 4 stone worth of gear (which a strength 12 character can carry without encumbrance). You can get there by wearing light armor (rounds down to 0 stone), strapping 1 big and 1 medium thing, carrying/wearing three medium things (bard instruments, weapons), and filling your backpack's 2 stone worth with w/e you want.
  • Today or tomorrow our group needs to hammer out waterskins. Big or medium? How much water can they carry etc etc. In real life, 4 gallons (two days worth) weigh two stone on their own. But if they're easier to carry than other items maybe there can be a discount? So these sheets will see some minor tweaks in that regard still.

    The most straightforward way is to just do 1 stone = 2 gallons. But then they are definitely going to die :(
  • Ah, I see, down in the corner there. Gotcha.
    Vivificient, thanks to your feedback I overhauled it a lot. If I were better at version management this would be version 3.
    Now it goes:
    small
    medium large

    And large is visually strapped to the backpack
    And the guides are rewritten. And it's more clear how to carry fewer big items.

    And best of all I made it easier to just grab a dungeoneer's pack & go!
    Sorry diplomats your chests are their own thing
  • Maybe you can group items in the shlepping guide by "type of use", like : daily life, clothes, combat
  • Yeah, maybe that's better? They're alphabetical now
  • The new version looks great. I like the 1, 2, 3 stone indications on the sides of the strap to backpack section.
  • Yeah, I noticed that having a 3-stone "atomic block" didn't really work in actual play. Veins of the Earth speaks of the need to like whittle down your toothbrush handles and this newer version, with the swapping & strapping guides reflects that better. Throwing out rations in order to be able to carry a bedroll etc...
  • The thought behind this is cool/excellent. In your game (ie. at your table), do armour, weapons, and backpacks take damage or wear-and-tear? That's something you might include on your sheet.
  • edited May 2018
    Thank you, Hopes.
    Wouldn't you just list "broken axe" instead of "axe"?
  • Sure, I was mostly thinking about the backpacks and pouches. Do they get damaged or worn-out? Do they have their own `hitpoints'?
  • At my own table they don't gradually wear out like that. They get stolen or destroyed completely sometimes. That's the best. One time the party necromancer lost an entire army of skeletons. That was pretty awesome♥

    I'm already concerned that it's too punishing because I really want players to use these systems and I'll even waive the 5 pound weight backpacks have in the RAW. I mean it's no more punishing than the actual RAW (if you use the optional encumbrance rule on p 176) but it's more punishing than some other games run around here. I'm just hoping that I'll be able to run it consistently and solidly enough that the challenge itself will be appealing.

    (For tables that want to charge that backpack weight, they can list the backpack itself among the worn medium things — see, I thought of everything.)

    That's also where you could put the item's HP? You'd list Sword 5hp, Backpack 3hp etc. I don't mind that sort of play, I have some video games that work like that and I like the mechanic a lot, but for now that's not going to be on the table for this particular campaign. We have plenty of items that run out (arrows, torches, lamp oil, insect repellant etc) as it is.
  • Latest update: Added 1 gallon and 2 gallon waterskins to the shlepping guide. You get a discount for the bigger one because the leather weighs less
  • Now up to version 5. Instead of "swapping" you now "unlock". It's pretty much the same but hopefully more people can understand. always playtesting it
    Also on my home page there are more instructions and a worked example
  • Looking nice! Downloaded the new version and added it to my useful D&D stuff collection.
  • I brutally and revisionistically updated the page — and the first post in this thread — with version six! Good bye chains, hello hard-to-name abstract shapes!
  • I might want to use this in my piecemeal set of rules for dungeoneering, if you don't mind.
    I see the source is SVG. What did you use to make it, and what would you recommend one use to alter it? Scribus, perhaps?
  • Inkscape!
  • Rafu, save a local copy because I brutally and revisionistially update the "official one". (I mean hopefully for the better. And I have saved some of the older versions… uh… somewhere on some old floppy somewhere… I think…)
  • Cool! Thanks!
  • edited July 2018

    I just brutally, revisionistically updated it again! That’s right, mere hours later! But that’s how it is, I come up with an idea and that causes some idea to rattle loose soon thereafter.

    For the interest of history of game design, but not for actual use , the version with the symbols is preserved in this post.

    I still like the versions with the symbols better than the version with the chains, and the chains better than the original swapping guide.

    It’s painful to throw out so much work. But sometimes you just stumble upon an easier solution.

    The symbols were meant as a clearer way of doing the same things as the chains version.
    The chains version as a clearer, more explicit way of doing the swapping.
    The swapping became necessary because my original idea didn’t take in mind that people would want to micromanage and optimize to the degree that they immediately started doing.

    But the new version goes back to my original idea and instead of doing swapping, just adds more flexible slots. People want to buy a big and a medium? Now they can, a combo deal. People want to carry things in the ration compartment of the backpack? Now there’s a space there for them to list those items. No more swapping, unlocking or buying slots. Just mark the circles you want and that’s the space you have.

    I really love how this latest version makes it visual how the slots just become heavier and heavier. A circle can carry three medium things easily but only one really heavy thing.

    Obsolete symbols version instruction and links are here:

    5e Inventory sheet

    So it looks like this:

    5e inventory sheet

    5e inventory sheet

    and you download it here

    Forget about weights. Clear your mind. This system replaces that with item slots of five different sizes. Tiny (a.k.a. “coin-sized”), Small, Medium, Big, and full Stone.

    Typically small things (like tinderboxes) go in your backpack, medium things (like weapons) you strap on yourself, and big thigs (like tents) you strap on your backpack. In case you’re still worried, there’s a guide printed on the sheet itself.

    I’m going to walk through it with an example. Sarah, the rogue.
    She notes her character’s weight – this isn’t going to matter for her encumbrance, but it’s good to know in case someone has to carry her body out of the dungeon – and her Strength score.

    Sarah noting her Strength

    Sarah noting her Strength

    Then she adds a third and two thirds.

    More specific encumbrance levels

    More specific encumbrance levels

    She wants to be unencumbered for this mission so she marks the left box.

    Left box

    Left box

    It’s a three, so that means she marks three circles. She is happy that her leather armor doesn’t weigh anything.

    Pro tip: always take the backpack at this stage. It has the most flexibility when you want to customize later, and it’s a good frame to strap things to.

    Three circles.

    Three circles.

    She can start listing her gear. She has thirty small item slots and three medium slots. (She could’ve also chosen a big slot instead of the three medium slot, or if she had been willing to go up to the next encumbrance level, she’d get six circles to mark, for example spending three of them in one go to get on five big slots, and one more on another set of three medium slots. But she likes to do it this way.)

    Only list gear in slots you’ve gotten access to by marking them.

    Sarah’s fave gear.

    Sarah’s fave gear.

    She’s happy with the medium slots, since she loves weapons. But that backpack looks pretty sparse, and she has some bigger things she’d like to take along.

    She can unlock a row for big things by crossing out ten small things. She does that twice. For the first she scratches out ten from the “ration corner”, and for the second she crosses out six from the “ration corner” and four from the “item section”. It doesn’t really matter – the backpack is thirty small item slots, it’s just that twenty of those slots take up less place on the sheet because you usually put rations there.

    Two new big slots.

    Two new big slots.

    That’s nice! Rope and bedroll strapped on there!

    The two big slots, filled.

    The two big slots, filled.

    Finally, she adds a small pouch. Small pouches can carry 50 tiny things like coins, candles, nails and gems and take up a small item slot. Medium pouches can carry 250 tiny things and take up a medium slot.

    (Secret tip #1: If you want an old-school, PHB style 300 coin pouch, you can fill in both, one medium and one small. But don’t do that, be happy with the pouches that are on here, that’s gonna be easier.)

    (Secret tip #2: If you need more pouches, use sticky notes or draw them on the back.)

    (Secret tip #3: You can put small things inside pouches. Draw a filled triangle on the line. Small things take up 50 tiny slots so one completely fills up a small pouch, or you can fit up to five in a medium pouch. So inside a medium pouch you might carry your small magical component pouch, alongside 200 gems&coins, for example.)

    She also adds two rations. Rations are the only exception to the otherwise neat tiny/small/medium/big/full-stone system, but it’s worth it because they’re so delicious. A ration takes up two small slots. That’s why there’s a “ration corner” of the backpack, with double-slots, she just circles two of those to indicate that she has yet to eat them. Or put Xs there or whatever you want.

    Done!

    Done!

    She has two empty small item slots and place for 50 coins or gems, in case she finds any on her mission. If she eats the food she’ll get even more room.

    PS: reversing

    If she later loses the rope, or ditches it, she can get ten small item slots back. Do that right away, your item slots can be life or death!♥

    PPS: source code

    Source code is here, improve it!

  • edited July 2018

    It’s interesting to see how this misguided evolution could take place…

    the first version was made just assuming you’d be able to carry it all. It took eight stones worth of gear and divided it up cozily. Adding some common sense presets (or so I thought). To make gear shopping faster. A backpack full of small items, wearing some medium items, strapping on some big items… but just a couple of test characters proved that version to be pretty untenable.

    I was like “enh, people can just swap around if they really want to micromanage”. Turns out everyone wants to do that. So then came some iterations of the “swapping guide” version. Some of these are lost to history, like a version that hade the 1 and 2 stones indicator for the big things on one side and the 3 stone indicator on the other. Or that didn’t have clear stones indicators in the first place.

    But, you know, asking people to read the fine print is… well, they won’t. The visuals need to be more clear and self-evident. Hence the “chains” version that we played with for many months. Worked really well.

    I intended the “symbols” version to be a small iteration on the “chains” version. One problem with the “chains” version was that it wasn’t clear that you’d unlock chained slots one at a time. And we found ourselves adding hand drawn circles to unlocked slots since you might want to have some empty slots around. The “symbols” version fixed that by making sure every unlockable slot had its own prerequisite and that that prerequisite applied to one slot, also, you’d mark it so you could empty it, refill it, empty it, refill it etc as you found and lost things. Also, in play, it had become clear that if your encumbrance levels are at 3, 6 and 9, there’s no need to sweat the difference between 4, 5 and 6. Once you were over 3 you might as well go to 6. In terms of slots if not in terms of gear.

    I made the “symbols” version yesterday but this morning I was thinking there are actually very few circles. I’ll just give you some more choices on how to spend your circles and then you don’t have to go to sub-currencies of “triangles” and “stars” and “pentagons”. Easier. And that’s how this current version got made. The second most common reasons for people to swap is that they have a slightly awkward configuration of medium vs big, so I added a combo box, and the most common reason for people to swap is that they aren’t happy with how much room there is in their backpack. So I made it easier to just put things there, no need to swap out. The entire “chain” idea was so disconnected, in hindsight.

    The latest version is closer to the first version than any other version. Sometimes you just go on a side trail :disappointed:
  • Some of these are lost to history, like a version that hade the 1 and 2 stones indicator for the big things on one side and the 3 stone indicator on the other. Or that didn’t have clear stones indicators in the first place.
    Is this one of the ones that was "lost in history"?

    https://drive.google.com/open?id=1S3qKT62qH21GqDEOLePiNbCc8AUSRHAx

    I think at some point I looked at this post and I think maybe one of the links was not updated or something? I distinctly remember that you were talking about the chains version as the latest and greatest, but I kept downloading this one—and I was just as happy, because I liked this one better :smile: So I held on to a copy in case you were to do something brutally revisionist!

    But I have to say, I like the new-new one even better. Very clear, and I personally appreciate removing the pre-made packs, since I plan on using this with other rules and won't have the 5e rules at hand anyway. (I was thinking about doing this myself, since you posted the source code, but now I won't have to!)
  • edited July 2018

    Jonatan, that one was lost in history yes! I did not have a copy of that one.♥

    I’ll save a copy on my server too. The chains idea was pretty wrong in hindsight, yes!

    (The reason I didn’t held on to that one is that there was a slightly improved version, linked above where I called it the “swapping guide” version, that I did still have. But in hindsight I’m glad to be able to showcase more of the evolutionary steps I pretend that someone cares)

  • Tiny aethestic changes + adds one more pouch. Previous version, the first with the “combo box”, is here.

    I was working on another idea today for hours but it didn’t work out so I threw it away. See, I don’t feist all of my unworkable ideas on you♥

    But that work also lead to the aesthetic changes, can’t help to tweak and decorate a little as I work.

  • Wait.. is the latest version now linked in the top post?
  • I really like the idea of "buying" slots of different sizes by filling in circles in the newer versions. That's super intuitive and avoids the confusion of converting slots of different sizes.
  • @Paul_T yeah!

    @Vivificient ♥ that means a lot to me! I am so proud of this♥♥♥
  • Great work !
  • Thank you DeReel♥
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