Godjobs

Destiny has a plan for all of us, with unlimited free texts and 50Gb of data. In this game, you pick up gigs on the Godjobs phone app to provide some divine intervention in an ordinary mortal life. Steer your Client towards their date with Destiny, but don't let them catch you at it!

Godjobs is a micro RPG, with virtually all you need contained on the six playbooks and the rule sheet that make up most of the content. In addition there is a help page for the game, containing tips & tricks to optimise play, laying out some assumptions and answering a few frequently asked questions. Anyone who is new to storygames in particular should read this page.

Relies on player input and creativity: there is no GM, instead everyone weaves the story together, using a standard deck of playing cards to guide you through creating a setting and Clients.

Uses a simple, narratively driven system and character playsheets: the cards determine the outcome of conflicts, but also enable you to activate supernatural powers of intervention!

Take on the jobs of the Grim Reaper, a Muse, Cupid, etc, and guide mortals to their destinies!

Comments

  • James,

    I'm curious whether this version is before or after the discussion on G+ (concerning shifting the focus of play, potentially, from the god-beings to the Clients).
  • This is the after playtest and feedback version, with Clients spotlighted and the play advice changed to reflect that.
  • Great premise! I really dig it.

    Just out of curiosity, why'd you choose a playing-card system to go with this?
  • I wanted one, single comprehensive system that could handle everything the game ought to do: provide an oracle to create story seeds, resolve conflicts and trigger powers. The cards were just the easiest way to do all three of those within the space of a micro game. :-)
  • Very cool! I've been thinking a bit about this lately as I've been listening to Design Doc, where they frequently talk about implementing different physical tools in RPGs beyond the traditional "set of dice". It's a neat design decision.
Sign In or Register to comment.