Why do you play?

I ask this for two reasons. Primarily because I have a research paper that I wish to do on the tabletop RPG culture. And also because of personal interest in game design and improvisation.

I wanted to ask a few questions: 1.) Why are dice used in tabletop RPGs and what is their significance to you?
2.) How do you get into the mood for a game session? What do you do to prepare for a session?
3.) Do any of the paraphernalia (rulebooks, dice, or maps) mean anything to you?
4.) What does role-playing mean to you? Do you fully immerse yourself into the character? 5.)How would you describe the importance of the GM or DM?
6.)How do you use stats to tell your story?
7.)If you've been a GM many times, what strategies did you use to achieve immersion with your players? How important is storytelling to you and what would describe as an ideal GM/player?

I don't know if these are the best questions to ask but they're the ones that come to mind. This information would be helpful so please be descriptive and if you have any questions I'll try my best to answer them

Thank You.

Comments

  • edited September 2017
    1.) Why are dice used in tabletop RPGs and what is their significance to you?
    Dice are a randomizer. There are other randomizers: cards, coins, stones drawn from a bag, etc. The type of randomizer isn't significant to me, although I draw the line at a single coin toss.
    2.) How do you get into the mood for a game session? What do you do to prepare for a session?
    I just show-up. I'm not being flippant with this answer. Showing-up to a session where there are other people who want to role-play is enough to get me in the mood to play. I usually play preparation-lite, nano-, role-playing games and story-games, so there is almost no preparation required. The only thing is just remembering to bring some dice and the one-page rule sheet.
    3.) Do any of the paraphernalia (rulebooks, dice, or maps) mean anything to you?
    Forty years ago, when I first started playing they meant everything to me. I was 12-years-old. It was almost the first mature "literature" I had ever read. Additionally, I found the random tables and all the background world-building stuff in the D&D DMG fascinating; and the more detail, the more fascinating it was too me. I was amazed that someone had spent so much time trying to simulate a game system (i.e. the physics of the world) and game world (i.e. the socio-cultural aspect of the world) in so much detail. When I moved on to playing Runequest/Glorantha, I was immediately and completely struck by the mythopoetics of it.

    These days, if a game is more than two pages, I'm not interested. First, I genuinely prefer the elegance of a nano-game. The idea that a great game can fit on one sheet of paper and even include great graphic design and art inspires me (see, any @John_Harper one-shot, like Ghost Echo). It probably has something to do with my desire to travel light. That's been a strong theme in my adult life. Second, I usually play in English with people whose first language isn't English. If the rules are too long and detailed, it is too much of a time commitment to make sure that everyone understands the game. And third, our sessions are usually short, so anything with massive amounts of character generation is not practical, either.
    4.) What does role-playing mean to you? Do you fully immerse yourself into the character?
    For me, role-playing is an imagination activity. But even when I was a kid playing, it wasn't about immersion. For me, it was about envisioning something that didn't exist except in the imagination. It was about character-centric story-telling and maybe a little bit about simulationist play. My friends were big into simulationist play--me, less so.

    These days, I see role-playing as an imagination and language activity (see below).
    5.)How would you describe the importance of the GM or DM?
    The importance to whom? To the game system? To me as a GM or player? To the other players when I'm the GM?

    It's almost all I do now, and a lot of what I did before.

    Before, it was about being an insider to the world-building--I didn't care so much about "directing" the story; whatever happened happened (even if it went against the design railroad of a module or adventure). But, knowing the back-story of the campaign, the cultures, the languages, the history, the mythology, the sites, that was cool.

    These days, it's mostly about facilitating other peoples' story-telling (i.e. helping them tell good stories in their second language) and keeping the game moving forward. My personal investment in the story or the world-building isn't that great anymore. I'm an EFL teacher. Role-playing is the gold standard of EFL teaching. I use role-playing games with advanced students to help them develop story-telling skills and other advanced language skills. If the students are having fun while developing important language skills at the same time, then it's a win-win for me.

    But really, you don't need a GM for a good game (depending on the game, of course), if everyone has even nascent story-telling skills (and everyone does!) and the language ability of their first language.
    6.)How do you use stats to tell your story?
    I'm assuming by stats, you mean stats, keys, aspects, bonus dice, skills, etc., and other ways of describing the character, as well. The stats are part of the mechanics of play in many or most games, so they are part of the game function. And they allow the players to shape their characters the way they want in games where players assign their stats as they wish (which are the only kind of games I play these days). Although, Ghost Echo, which I mentioned above, has no stats at all, and it seems to work just fine without them. Lot's of other story-games like Love and Darkness don't have stats for characters, but players aren't advocating for any particular character in those games. Your question here is a too open-ended.
    7.)If you've been a GM many times, what strategies did you use to achieve immersion with your players? How important is storytelling to you and what would describe as an ideal GM/player?
    When I was a kid playing, I didn't even know what immersion was and I'm not sure that I would have cared even if I did have a working definition (I was playing in the early days of the hobby. People didn't have a descriptive language for these things, and I'm not sure that we even thought about it). When I GM'ed, I would set the stage, provide some adventure hook, and let the chips fall as they may. I'd run the NPCs based on whatever the adventure text said their motivation was, but I didn't have any investment in whether they achieved their goals or not.

    Nowadays, since I play mostly nano-story-games, and many of those are collaborative GM-less games, at least in theory, my goal is to get out of the way as much as possible (I don't actually play). When the mechanics of the game call for some kind of action on the players' part, I prompt them. When the story starts to falter, I offer some suggestions. When there are language issues, I help smooth over the rough spots. Sometimes, I'll offer colour text for the students to get them going; sometimes it's more than that depending on the English level of the students. Mostly, my GM function is just as referee-facilitator'--keeping the game going. Concerns about player immersion aren't at the top of my list of things to worry about. I give the students homework writing exercises for them to flesh-out their characters. But I'm not sure if that is what you mean by immersion.

    N.b. you should probably offer up a definition of what you mean by immersion. In your opinion, where does immersion come from? Does it originate in a single source, or multiple aspects (the GM, players, game design, colour text, graphic art, rules, etc.) of the game? Whose responsibility is the immersion? Your question implies that it's the GM's responsibility but I'm not sure that's true.
  • edited September 2017
    .
  • 1.) Why are dice used in tabletop RPGs and what is their significance to you?
    Dice are a tool. Their main use is to provide objective uncertainty where needed. An example of a secondary use is that they're helpful in making arbitrary choices.
    2.) How do you get into the mood for a game session? What do you do to prepare for a session?
    Depends on the game. I'm a lazy GM, and I tend to do whatever prep a given game requires hastily at the last possible time. Aside from game-specific prep I don't have any particular pre-game rituals - I might clean the gaming space or cook something for the group or something of the sort, but that's all.
    3.) Do any of the paraphernalia (rulebooks, dice, or maps) mean anything to you?
    Not as objects of emotional attachment, no. They all have potential to be important tools for a given game, though. I do not collect gaming paraphernalia, but I will buy or make the right kinds of tools for a given game, so in that sense I hold material tools in high regard. I tends towards moderately tool-light rpgs, the theater of the mind is in much more important position than physical props in most of the things I do.
    4.) What does role-playing mean to you? Do you fully immerse yourself into the character?
    "Role-playing", detached from the more general concept of "role-playing game", is the act of pretending to a role. It mainly differs from "acting" by emphasis - when considering acting we emphasize the performative aspect, while "role-playing" often concerns the internal experience of taking on the role and experiencing it from the inside. Role-playing does not necessarily involve character immersion, but it can.

    The act of role-playing is, perhaps ironically, at most a moderately important part of my gaming hobby. I play many roleplaying games in which there are much more important concerns than the literal play-acting of a role.

    I rarely immerse in character very strongly, and I would not call anything I've ever done "fully immersing". It would be more precise to call me an skeptical of immersion altogether; there are probably more useful ways to characterize the experience of taking on a role.
    5.)How would you describe the importance of the GM or DM?
    The GM is a game conceit that has proven its efficacy over time; it is a powerful and flexible way to organize a roleplaying game, and there are many independent, good reasons to design a game on that basis. It is not, however, a mandatory element for a roleplaying game.

    One way to characterize the importance of the GM for roleplaying would be to compare him to the use of percussion instruments in music; you can do music without percussion, sometimes it's the right call to forego percussion, but nobody will deny that percussion is a powerful and historically proven approach to making music.
    6.)How do you use stats to tell your story?
    I assume you mean the use of character statistics in a roleplaying game that focuses on storytelling of some kind.

    There are many different ways, different games have their own structures. As an illustrative example, one common way to use character statistics is to define an ensemble of characters in terms of their mutually complementary strengths and weaknesses. This is done by setting an array of stats and ensuring that the characters in the ensemble differ from each other in their stat distributions. Once this is accomplished, the characters facilitate stories about team-work, as they are forced to ask each other to cover their respective weaknesses.
    7.)If you've been a GM many times, what strategies did you use to achieve immersion with your players? How important is storytelling to you and what would describe as an ideal GM/player?
    I rarely strive to achieve immersion per se, because I only rarely play games where it's a goal. I do many things that may contribute to immersion as a side effect, such as teaching the group to understand the rules of the game, creating a calm and unhurried play space, encouraging the other players to be active participants, and so on.

    Storytelling is important to me as an art form, but just like immersion, it's not the be-all, end-all of roleplaying - there are other priorities to pursue, if one wishes. There are many ways of incorporating storytelling into roleplaying, and I am fond of many games that do it.

    My ideal gamer is curious, patient, passionate and ambitious. These traits can, of course, substantiate in many different ways.

  • 1.) Why are dice used in tabletop RPGs and what is their significance to you?
    It's a randomizer and impartial arbiter of the changes in the story and as that, a tool to discover it. The more I read the dice as they fall and make everyone feel I'm going by it instead of my own wishes, the more my calls feel impartial. I make prep and players make choices, but none of us knows what could end up happening thanks to the dice.

    2.) How do you get into the mood for a game session? What do you do to prepare for a session?
    I search for concept art images, music and mechanics in the core books for inspiration, as well as taking a good look at whatever has happened before in the story to come up with consequences. If it's the first session I draw in from the players character sheets, make questions about how they see their characters and the world around them, why do they took specific choices and build things up from there. Brainstorming the setting works good for this too, though everything has to start from an idea we're all interested into.

    3.) Do any of the paraphernalia (rulebooks, dice, or maps) mean anything to you?
    The more I use them the more they mean to me. They become a memento of all those adventures we had, a proof they happened, at least in our heads.

    4.) What does role-playing mean to you? Do you fully immerse yourself into the character?
    Learned not to go that deep, otherwise you risk bleed and miss all the other fun of the game: creative expression, hanging out with your friends, the mental challenge, etc. Otherwise I do enjoy thinking, speaking and acting like my character.

    5.)How would you describe the importance of the GM or DM?
    At least one person at the table needs to be focused on both the small things and the big picture, keep things rolling and happening, introduce mystery by handling the information properly and surprising twists. Building the ambience and arbitrating the rules so everything goes smoothly too. This all can be handled by the players themselves or the game system, but even then, coordinating things properly becomes easier/faster with a single person in charge.

    6.)How do you use stats to tell your story?
    For me stats end up being about two things: what your character does and what it is. Both things can tell a story if given proper thought, but it's also very important that the character story is intertwined with the game story and the background of the fictional world, otherwise it's lost.

    7.)If you've been a GM many times, what strategies did you use to achieve immersion with your players? How important is storytelling to you and what would describe as an ideal GM/player?
    I have the players build the world and try to make provocative questions to help them express and solidify the ideas they have come up with when exposed to the game's content. I try to get a good idea about their expectations, but asking them indirectly about them, sometimes giving them wrong suggestions for them to react and tell me their actual expectations. Otherwise they either get a blank page syndrome or overreact and give me useless information.

    Other times I use the music and the images I collected, throw them unclear information and watch their reaction carefully, hear their thoughts about it and throw that back on them amplified. Most of the time I'm more impressed and interested on whatever they came up with than with whatever I have prepared.


    BTW, this may be useful to you too.
  • edited September 2017
    1) Dice are typically used to introduce elements into an ongoing game which don't align with players' immediate wishes, some of which might make for interesting plot-twists, while disclaiming responsibility for introducing those - they're part of the game mechanics in their role as a "ghost player", interacting with the human players in ways they can't fully anticipate or control.
    Dice as material items are actually quite ill-suited for this role, my best guess being we only keep using them out of historical precedent and affection (they've become a bit of an emblem to an activity with not a lot of material items to put on display). On the other hand, the extreme awkwardness of dice in this role has perhaps been a fruitful limitation to game-designers and players, forcing them to continually devise and revise new ways to extract something meaningful from a bunch of random numbers.
    I quite like my dice, as visual and tactile toys to fidget with, and over the years I've collected a large (although not disproportionate) amount. I'm not obsessed with them, though, and a majority of the games of my own design end up not using them.

    2) I'm always ready! I look forward to the next scheduled game session for all of the working week in-between, and very few things can get me more excited than musing about RPGs. I always jump to the opportunity to squeeze in an extra game. I'd have to be really saturated and intellectually exhausted - like, right out of a 48-hours RPG marathon - to pass on an opportunity to game.
    That said, if specific preparations are required, when the day of the game comes I'm almost never ready. Say I'm GM for a game which requires me to stat out NPCs or draw a relationship map or sketch out plot-lines in-between sessions: well, I'm always lagging behind, always a bit late.

    3) As I said above, I quite like my dice, as visual and tactile toys to fidget with. My Tarot decks (I have several) and regular playing card decks (including a couple high-end collector/cardistry ones and a few nice picture/souvenir ones) I also keep stored with my role-playing paraphernalia, as I seldom use them for any other purpose.
    Books are books, and I love books - all of them, not just role-playing books - but not in that obsessive collector, plastic-wrapped-comic-books way: I like to read them and skim them, use and abuse them, lend and borrow, lose and find. Role-playing games take up a significant portion of my bookshelves. These days, the big colorful hardcovers are just a small portion of those, though, and even the slender, pocket-sized soft-cover books are a minority: they tend to drown amongst a sea of home-printed PDF documents I've bound myself in shockingly amateurish, almost "punk" ways. Most of the <80 pages ones are just saddle-stitched and look fine that way, but anything thicker is held together by a haphazard combination of hole-puncher, paper clips, thread, shoestring and gift-wrap ribbon, rubber bands and the occasional hint of glue. Most of my older RPG books, including a sizable collection of D&D3 hardcovers and magazines and much more exotic stuff from the 1990s, are stashed in crates somewhere in my parents' attic, but I treasure my Everway boxed set and always keep it close by.
    I'll impulse-buy anything cheap enough if I believe I can use it for RPGs: this way I've acquired Jenga towers, multiple domino sets, truckloads of colored glass beads, portable chessboards, metric tons of sticky notes, etc.

    4) "Role-playing" is more of a legacy term, in that it's indeed the name I call what I do, but isn't especially descriptive of the activity.
    Depending on how you define "immersion", experiencing the character as if you were them, almost like a possession-trance state, is likely impossible to achieve in tabletop role-playing games - it might be possible to achieve in larp, even very simple larp, and I believe I've been close on occasion, but not quite there (not sure I'd even want to).
    If we just define "immersion" as making all of your decisions, all of your in-game moves based on what you imagine your character "would do", to the exclusion of any other conflicting priorities... I don't believe that to be a very productive ideal to strive for. I don't do that. I believe the best moments I've experienced in role-playing depended on being simultaneously conscious of multiple viewpoints, including: mine as a conduit or proxy for a character, mine as an author to (the character's) story, mine as a spectator to the unfolding story.

    5) First and foremost, those are semantically-overloaded legacy terms: here's an essay I wrote about this issue years ago which barely scratches at the tip of the iceberg.
    As a teenager I obsessed about being, or becoming, a "good" GM - which ended up getting in the way of everybody's enjoyment of the game, including mine. These days, if and when a game includes a separate role called a "GM" or something like that (perhaps 1/3-1/2 the RPGs I play do) I try to approach it as just that: being a player with a distinct role - distinct moves to do, separate but interlocking tasks, etc. When playing such a role, I try and play it "by the book", the exact specifics of which vary wildly from game to game. A rules-set not providing such guidance I'll usually avoid, or at least approach very cautiously.
    Looking back, I can easily see how conflating a lot of jobs into a single "play group chairman" has been used a lot as an easy (perhaps lazy) fix to a number of common issues coming up with games, whenever there was no immediately obvious way to design around them. Truth is, some of those issues I'm actually able to fix, some I can't (perhaps someone else can? not me, though).
    One job (of many) which has sometimes been conflated with "GM" is that of house host. After several years of regularly playing at home, I can't really stress enough how important it is for a house host to mind their duties. I'm lucky to share this role, so I only shoulder about 50% of it; but that half of it is my responsibility, no matter whether I'm "GM" of the week's game or not, and I know I have to take it to heart - it will reflect negatively upon the game if I don't.

    6) The eternal companion of dice, numerical stats in RPGs usually form an encoded capsule description of a character or other fictional entity. In most games, they are poorly suited to this role, but I work with what I have.
    Stats in some RPGs at least make for a convenient shorthand for recording multiple characters on paper ("NPCs" usually). If the game is cunningly designed in this regard, the process of writing down stats for multiple characters will, as a side-effect, make me come up with non-trivial details of characterization I wouldn't have thought of if no numerical stats were involved. Conversely, if there are too many stats for a single character, I tend to forget about them entirely and use some other shorthand to inspire my portrayal.
    WRT to stats, I like games where changing numbers keep track of thematically significant changes in the fiction and build up to cause deeply significant events, twists, epilogues, etc. (stats used as an intermediate link in a fiction-to-fiction feedback loop). Otherwise, I'd rather not have numbers in a game at all.
  • 7) Yeah, I'm often a GM. While I don't specifically plan for immersion, I do aim to facilitate engagement - both when in a "GM" role or otherwise. The most important part in facilitating engagement, though, is played as a host, in curating participation at the social level: who's invited, what history do they have with each other, how you "sell" them on the activity. Creative leadership - getting everybody "on the same page" regarding what game to play and how - is also heavily based on this social level: it relies on knowing people, their interests and proclivities; also, on being open and honest about these topics (while being friendly and polite, of course).
    Storytelling skills don't matter as much as basic interpersonal skills. The "ideal" player I want to play RPGs with (in any role) is someone who always listens attentively but also contributes enthusiastically, who is on the same creative page with everyone else but also has a specific angle of their own they're able to push, perhaps based on something personal to them they can express through play.
  • edited September 2017
    1.) Why are dice used in tabletop RPGs and what is their significance to you?
    A lot of what happens in an RPG, one or more players just decide. Dice are for when "just decide" is suboptimal in some way -- socially, creatively, or fairness-wise, for the three most common examples.
    2.) How do you get into the mood for a game session? What do you do to prepare for a session?
    Prep is usually speculative game design. Mood is usually brewed up once the group's assembled, via pitch (if new game) or recap (if ongoing).
    3.) Do any of the paraphernalia (rulebooks, dice, or maps) mean anything to you?
    In general, I would like them to be super quick and easy to use during play, with minimal distraction from imagining stuff. In some specific RPGs, though, the opposite is true, and interacting with the cool scroll or whatever is the whole point.
    4.) What does role-playing mean to you? Do you fully immerse yourself into the character?
    Character immersion is just one way to do it. It's probably my favorite, but I have others I like too.
    5.)How would you describe the importance of the GM or DM?
    The presence of this role may allow everyone else to largely just inhabit their character! A GM can also script a plot, which can be fun. A lead event facilitator (which tends to be the GM, but doesn't have to be) is also often an efficient way to apportion authority and responsibilities in a given group.
    6.)How do you use stats to tell your story?
    Stats can represent the realities of the game's world, which in turn define the realms of possibility and probability for the story's characters. Or you can skip the gameworld reality bit and just go straight to character options.

    Simply put, when an RPG character wants something, their stats might tell them which approach is most likely to succeed. Or, which approaches are not likely to succeed, "So come up with something else!"
    7.)If you've been a GM many times, what strategies did you use to achieve immersion with your players? How important is storytelling to you and what would describe as an ideal GM/player?
    To facilitate immersion, take the fiction seriously, play it consistently, establish clear conventions to distinguish in-game/out-of-game speech, use rules that are fictionally plausible, favor fictional causality as much as possible, render real world inputs into the fiction as subtle as possible, and address any player behavior that breaks other players' immersion.

    Storytelling is great when that's what I want, and not great when I want something else. I like to choose between storytelling/not with full awareness.

    An ideal GM/player is a good team player across all the relevant facets of the activity. Creative, precise, punctual, relaxed, sober, high, a good actor, a good strategist... these are some examples. Few are universal beyond enthusiasm, actually showing up, and caring about the other participants.

    I guess my personal ideal GM would be someone with a really unique fantasy world of their own, and the design and presentation skills to allow me to explore it and pursue agendas in it while completely immersed, preferably once per week.

    And when I'm trying to be that GM, then my ideal player is someone who feels the same way I do about that goal and wants to help make it happen.
  • edited October 2017
    I answer because, hey, why not.

    Dice are the trace of something ancient. Bones. They mean
    - the known root of the RPG tree, D&D, comes from wargames (at subtactic scale) where dice meant conflict resolution, using tables where you crossed two opposing power values. Perdon my english
    - storytelling uses ritual paraphernalia (cards, dice) linked to fortune telling because it aimed at a public of teenagers. I won't analyze or explain, only point at the analogy with metal music culture in the states and summarize : theatricality.

    As M. Wanderer said, you've got to distinguish a teen's take of the rpg subculture and the granpa player point of view. So, if something is still true : music in major or minor, anachronicity avoidance at the table. For a game of Rêve (Oniros), I go some length : there needs to be food, could be mushrooms, cheese or snails, cider, something along the lines : you want to induce dreams and echo the "cultural landscape" of the game. I guess food is always important in organizing a game when I think of it.

    The drawings and editing are very important in a book / pdfyou buy. I don't buy much games, but still. And yes, paraphernalia are important even now : shiny tokens, tarot cards. If there is magic, there is a ritual.

    Roleplaying is about creating stories together. The drives of the character are very important to me, but the immersion I don't really see what it is. I need maps very much to know the space where the story takes place. Words are lacking to xommunicate what is obvious to the senses. So description is key, not only for flavour, but for basic interaction. Drawing a map is like turning on your radar rather than relying on a shoutbox to know what is happening.

    Stats vary from games to games. Many games don't use stats. I think the thing to keep in mind here is that players use stats to communicate what they want for their character and the story.

    Granpa gamer raving : "I remember this Vampire campaign back in 92 My aim was to make a world, to create the feeling of a world where the players' characters could pursue whatever they were after. And they found it lacking purpose when they had none. So my aim as a GM was to storytell in a way the story meant something. Something more thematic than dramatic. Something that actually meant something.

    GMing is tyranny. I don't like the behaviours it encourages on either SIDES of the stick. It could be different in a drama class, but I'd rather Spolin impro than Actor studio as a hobby.

    My 2 cts
  • 1.) Why are dice used in tabletop RPGs and what is their significance to you?
    They're used to achieve randomization. I actually personally prefer not to use them, because I feel like they often get in the way of the stories that we're trying to tell. It throws unnecessary monkeywrenches and makes things not work right more often than it helps.
    I have a major major preference for diceless games, tbh.

    2.) How do you get into the mood for a game session? What do you do to prepare for a session?
    As a GM, I just kind of look over my notes, make sure everything is fresh on my mind.
    As a player, I read over my notes on my character, and my notes on mine and the rest of the group's plans for the narrative, so that I can be working towards the stuff we're planning, and help the story get told the ostensible "right" way.

    3.) Do any of the paraphernalia (rulebooks, dice, or maps) mean anything to you?

    Not really. They're just kind of a means to an end.

    4.) What does role-playing mean to you? Do you fully immerse yourself into the character?
    I'm a big fan of really immersive stuff. My ideal RP experience is the campaign being 85% just the PCs talking in character. Role-playing is the fun part for me, because the story is in the characters (at least with the way that my group does things).

    5.)How would you describe the importance of the GM or DM?
    In my eyes, the GM/DM is kind of the least important and least influential one there. The GM is just the facilitator, helping the players with the complicated details that help along their stories. In the paradigm my players and I use, the players are the storytellers, and the GM is just there to help.

    6.)How do you use stats to tell your story?
    The stats are for my group and I just a means of putting mechanics to the characters we've written and have planned the story around. So the stats are important because they're part of the players's connection to the game and their ability to affect things in the world, but generally the stats are just there to give the PCs mechanics for things they already know, have already written, have already planned.

    7.)If you've been a GM many times, what strategies did you use to achieve immersion with your players? How important is storytelling to you and what would describe as an ideal GM/player?
    I do a lot of encouraging the players to really be focused on being immersed in their characters, because if they're not really immersed in their character and the RP, nothing is really going to happen, because everything in my group's campaigns is extremely extremely character-driven.
    Storytelling is the whole goal for me, and the ideal player to me is someone who's really going to engage with that storytelling goal, and who's really going to work hard to plan things towards that goal. Planning the characters - their backstories, personalities, psychologies, the way that they interact - and planning the narrative they want those characters to have - their character arcs, significant relationships, things they're going to do in the world, etc.
  • I missed this thread somehow. So much good stuff! A great read.
Sign In or Register to comment.