[OSR Actual Play] Greysands Campaign - call for IRC players

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  • Not sure I feel positively towards your suggested changes; I've seen similar, experimented myself and just want to lay down what I feel are the benefits of the systems as-is. I'm not a contrarian, I'm just great believer in advocating for the devil. :D Any proposed changes could probably do to keep the boons of OSR conservatism in view.

    I don't know if early level characters being (a) statistically similar and (b) statistically prone to failure is a bug or a feature. I think it adds a certain structure to early level play characterised by essentially unheroic characters who aren't much different from the man on the street just starting to be introduced to a world of adventure. As levels are gained the characters become more embellished fictionally and variate from one another to a greater degree. As Attribute Stats don't grow with level in B/X, at least, the Prime Requisite rules offer numerical granularity to similar PCs - anyone can be a fighter, but a fighter with high strength will grow 5-10% faster than his weaker counterpart. Specialists are created over time, rather than introduced up front as in later editions of D&D.

    Your proposed changes are interesting but if I wanted what you want it would probably be less effort to begin play at a higher level (Gygax himself, legend goes, had a houserule that PCs start at lvl.3).
  • edited April 2014
    I appreciate the Devil's advocacy, that's always welcome!

    I agree with all your comments about the curious nature of D&D, and how's it worth preserving, although I still don't really see the point of the prime requisite bonus: surely having the high stats appropriate to your class's pursuits should pay off in better survivability and more experience point gains anyway?

    As for the hit points issue, I've played OSR-style D&D with the "start at 3rd level" rule in action, and it's a decent fix for certain perceived issues, but I think mine is better. As you point out, by 3rd level characters are already specialized and drifting into their special roles, further and further apart. They are more complex and character "building" can already start to become a desired thing.

    More importantly, they are still either a) impervious to most attacks (if they roll well for hit points, they know they can, for example, take a couple of arrows point-blank and be guaranteed to survive) or b) hopelessly fragile (if they roll poorly for hit points), with no way to change that or improve their condition. I'm not fond of that aspect of D&D, personally; I'm growing more and more enamoured by the slight variation in ability which brings to the fore player skill and strategy over character builds. I don't see the need for a 3rd level Fighter (who already has better weapons, Strength, and armour) to have 20-28 hit points while his companion the wizard has 5. I think a range of roughly double would suit the game just as well.

    [I've settled on a method for hit point improvement in the meantime, and edited my earlier post to reflect that.]
  • I still don't really see the point of the prime requisite bonus: surely having the high stats appropriate to your class's pursuits should pay off in better survivability and more experience point gains anyway?
    It's an artifact from OD&D. By the brown books, Strength didn't give any kind of bonuses to-hit or –damage: so that XP bonus was the main way that it produced better survivability. It's precisely because Hit Points are such a major site of difference, too: it was a way for that stat to give you more of them by levelling up faster.
  • edited April 2014
    Ah! Now that makes some sense. Thanks!

    I didn't know the order in which prime requisite bonuses and ability bonuses were introduced (when I played "White Box" D&D I seem to recall having neither in play); this explains a lot.
  • Oh Paul, I see you're here arguing rules mechanics when those other elves are taking away your Waters as we speak...
  • Yep, Lark and company snatched two flasks of the Waters of Life and Death yesterday. The actual deed was done, very bravely, by Debby the house elf from the Hidden Trollop inn. A lower fae, Mandrake the Toadstool (some sort Ewok-like thing?), helped us find the spring in exchange for an oath from Lark: he would bring Yeschant and the other elves here and start a new commune, hopefully supplanting the local elves with our own, more noble, tribe.

    One flask of the Waters was used to heal Lark's sister, who otherwise wouldn't recover from being almost killed by a hellhound. The other flask went with Debby, who said she'd use it to bake the most magical cake.
  • I rather like the marked tendency for the elves to adventure sort of laterally to the human economic imperative of finding gold. Lark got 500 xp for helping his sister, which I found a quite elfy development (in terms of idealistic, Tolkien/Elfquest elves that we have here). Good job, one of the few successes in the campaign so far.

    The only human adventurer in the party, Escargot the fighter, got his just rewards in the form of a precious gem that the elves gave him in thanks for escorting Lark on his dangerous mission. Good for him, as the adventure proved ultimately pretty easy - such a hexcrawl often is when you have the talent of not rolling any random encounters despite spending several days in the Old Woods.
  • The dice sort of evened out on us: we rolled favourably on all the random encounters, but it took us 12 d6 before we got a '1' for the search roll.
  • That wouldn't have helped you any, considering that you were searching in the wrong hex, except that you had some luck in turning the random encounter into something useful. Debby was key, very lucky to have her along.
  • edited April 2014
    Ah! This is interesting news.

    I wonder if anyone has informed Arsuin - or whether some rumour has reached him - for otherwise he might still foster an unhealthy obsession with this pool.

    (And while I found the joke quite funny, I should point out that this is something I've thought about before, not specifically related to this particular game - and I'm still fond of my solution for the moment.)
  • Well, in practice I think if we had rolled that '1' earlier, and found something other than the pool, we would have concluded that it was the wrong hex and moved on. Hard to say if that would have ended up better though, since I remember planning on moving further east before going north.

    Paul_T: what joke?
  • Oh, I'm just amused at Eero poking fun at me for discussing mechanics here while certain other Elves are actually taking action and getting drunk on the waters of life and death!
  • While it's still on my mind, here's another hit point variation which is kind of interesting (not my idea this time):

    Characters have a hit die pool, like in my little hack.

    When they get hit by something, they roll their hit point pool. Compare the highest die rolled to the damage: if it is better than the damage rolled, the attack can be ignored (the character has shrugged it off). If it is equal to or lower, discard that die from the hit point pool. Subtract its value from the damage, and compare the remaining damage to the next highest die.

    Healing works by restoring dice to the pool.

    So, for example, if my pool is 2d6+1d4, and a monster hits me for 1d6+1 damage. The monster rolls a total of 5. If I roll a 5 or higher on one of the dice, I'm fine. But if I roll poorly - let's say I roll 4, 1, 1. The 4 is lower than the damage, so I lose that die. The remaining damage is 1, which knocks out the second die. I'm alive, but I only have one die remaining for the next attack.

    Interesting. Has some similar features to my idea, and some slightly different ones. (Models regular accumulating/ascending hit point, in that regard it's just like regular D&D.)
  • Saddened I missed playing with you guys last night.

    I won't go into my misadventure but it involved being stranded 250 miles away from home, food poisoning and youth vandalism of our public transportation services. I had planned to be back in good time from my weekend in Leeds for play Sunday evening but the immediate demands of intermittent vomiting/travel logistics prevented me from even letting you know I might be late ("Mike, you are poisoned for 1d6 hours and cannot act except to vomit; -4 CHA when persuading someone to help you.") Sounded like a great session though!
  • Was there play yesterday evening? I hung out as I usually do, but went to sleep relatively early as nothing seemed to be manifesting aside from Glorantha theological discourse on another channel.

    Just fine with me, really - we got to play on Friday, after all. Anybody wants to play next week, I'm likely to be available.
  • Oh, sorry, I thought you were discussing Sunday - but this must've been Friday. Maybe we should set up a spreadsheet on Drive that shows when games have happened/ when people are generally free to play.

    I'm keen to get folk back to the Seafort (or at least towards Greysands proper - perhaps hexplore into the East?) sometime this week. I've run the Seafort with two different physical playgroups now and it's being worked into something smooth and fun as a module-of-sorts in its own right. Or at least I'm confident of its workings generally and the kinds of experiences likely to occur.
  • I love hexploration, and I'd like to try out being mapper to someone else's caller/expedition leader as well (I've been leading both of the times I've took part). Consider me signed up for a Sunday evening evening hexcrawl. Don't think I could make Friday (if that was on the table for anyone else).
  • edited April 2014
    I love being expedition leader, so maybe we should petition Eero (or another brave soul) to be Master for a journey East? Or maybe get to the port-city of Carrion and try find employment as sailors to distant isles in the West?

    I tried to introduce the idea of Expedition Leader/Caller to my playgroup as a procedural method of speeding play and met resistance from unexpected quarters. It was implied that this was the worst attack on their agency they'd ever seen a DM try sneak under their noses since the last DM was abandoned in what is now known as Quantum Golem-gate. I assured them my intentions were noble but there was no political will for change thereafter. Callers aren't essential and not for everyone but it looks like my experimentation with it in "IRL" has been put on hold.
  • Who knows! Now that the seed is planted, you may be able to back off and let them gravitate towards this fairly natural arrangement themselves.
  • image

    Well thanks for giving the game away, Ariadne!
  • I tried to introduce the idea of Expedition Leader/Caller to my playgroup as a procedural method of speeding play and met resistance from unexpected quarters. It was implied that this was the worst attack on their agency they'd ever seen a DM try sneak under their noses since the last DM was abandoned in what is now known as Quantum Golem-gate.
    Not asking you to defend their point of view, but just trying to understand: What was it about the caller role that made them feel as if their agency was being reduced?

  • I was just thinking how cool it would be if we could merge the Expedition Leader and the Dungeon Master into the same role - at least maybe for hex crawls. I mean, if we were to put most all the creative impetus into context-appropriate random tables we could quite easily wander off into the east or out to sea on our own steam.

    I'd like to think that we would be mature enough to award ourselves a fair (or better yet! Interesting) wage for being taken on as sailors or something. In fact, we could be really specific about what we want as players (say, to own a ship outright and have sea adventures!) and then take reasonable steps to bring it about. E.g. a player retires their character and rolls up a ship's captain who is positioned to own a vessel within his starting fiction (this is seemingly good fortune, but should probably be a matter of responsibility for the player).

    Is this a path only to blatant self-love and false challange, or might it be possible with a healthy mindset and good communication about meaningful activity?

  • Not asking you to defend their point of view, but just trying to understand: What was it about the caller role that made them feel as if their agency was being reduced?
    Literally because it was seen as limiting their ability to speak and have agency of action whenever they wished. I explained that there were gravely mistaken and we all agreed that, yes, it probably would work the way I said, but by then it was all tainted by table disagreement and was tastefully dropped as a subject. I make this seem serious, it was actually expressed with laughter, mock-lawyerisms and flatulence. But the general feeling was that my players are big enough and ugly enough to express their own actions coherently and with consideration for others, and didn't need Moldvay to teach them how to "suck eggs."
  • It's not for everyone, certainly. My own experience has been that this arrangement emerges naturally around the ~20th session of play anyway, if the group does high-maintenance procedural dungeon-crawling. We never explicitly chose a caller in Upper Savo, or here in Helsinki - it's just happened because it's more efficient to play that way. We get more done, and the players actually have an easier time when it's clear who has the responsibility for driving forward. Trying to do without feels a lot like trying to have mapping happen by just having "everybody map". You can see the psychological and logistic issues with that.

    As for play, I'm cool for later in the week. Sunday's as good as any day. I can run stuff unless somebody else wants to try. I think we can find excuses for hex-crawling, or ocean-crawling, or savage turf war in the Old Woods (or Carrion for that matter), as well as other possibilities. Anybody wants to set something up in advance (that is, create characters, negotiate adventure hooks, gear up) is welcome to observe the IRC channel and ambush other players for negotiations. It's always quicker to start actual play if the logistics phase has already been done beforehand, and it's one of those things that IRC makes easy. (As a side effect: a GM who knows a couple days in advance about what play's going to be about can actually prepare something in advance, too. Not that you can't prep for an open sandbox, of course, but more focused prep is more focused prep, even if I'm personally all too often too lazy to do anything with the opportunities.)
  • Ah, actually there's no reason why I couldn't throw out some notes about adventure hooks here. Ask about any of these in detail in IRC if you feel like it, or complain to get more:

    An adventurous ship captain in Carrion is hiring free blades to join them in a "considerable venture", with ship shares available for the wealthy or those bringing special talents. The captain, one Samson Off-the-Hook, has a reputation for exploratory trade with the wizard refugia, making him a suspect man in the eyes of the Archon, but a romantic figure for those yearning for the days of the federation. However, Samson apparently has had trouble getting takers for his latest endeavour, for one reason or another.

    Another, much duller shipping mission is also leaving Carrion soon; it's heading towards Moriarty, a distant trading post on the north-eastern coast, a place of rising importance in the furring trade now that the southern demand has largely exhausted the capacity of the province to provide. Captain Melchior Harker is a southerner, but capable of navigating the icy northern waters after 15 years largely developing this trade. For one reason or another, they're offering free board to sturdy men willing to join them, no questions asked.

    (Those are both obviously major undertakings, not one-shot adventures or anything close to such. Doesn't mean that they can't be sampled, of course.)

    Carrion is obviously a city of adventure in the vein of the likes of Lankhmar and Sanctuary and such; an environment I'm pretty fond of myself. I'm sure we could arrange for entanglements of exciting variety therein, like we did earlier in the Affair of the Pseudodragon. Some hooks are out in the wind, in fact, even if not all players are aware of those...

    Sniper Joe's map might potentially involve hexcrawling, should it be solved. Who has the map now?

    Yeschant and Lark of the western elves are apparently moving into the Old Woods near Irllendom to lay claim upon the woods. I'm sure that this'll be a famous adventure. Likely their last :D

    A story has been floated about the abbot Sibalius and his wondrous wine cellar. A light-hearted, alcohol-saturated adventure rumoured to present access to a bottle or more of the miraculous Vivamorte vintage.

    I've also got pretty good stuff brewing in Irllendom, it's just that nobody's managed to get that far yet. I'd be happy to have any reputable characters join Jimgrim the merchant at Carrion to journey with him there. There's no pay for "caravan guards" on this secure road, not with Jimgrim a master merchant himself with a seasoned crew, but you'll have experienced company, you'll be fed if you can either handle the animals or carry a weapon, and he's willing to take any who stick with him down south across the wastes free of charge :D

    Regarding the eastern lands and hexcrawling therein, my understanding is that they're predominantly unbroken, non-civilized wilderness when you get inland from the coast, dotted by abandoned ruins of wizard-king era, and hardliner federalists and outlaws who prefer living out on the mercies of the forest savages and such. Not many civilized destinations that way, nothing rivalling Carrion (although Irllendom might apparently find its match in one more barony in the east), not unless you count the dwarven closures further east, in the mountains.

    The major southern trade cartel LONTH has maintained a reward of 10 000 ecus going on a decade now for finding a safe way through the wastes that'd link up the south-eastern trade hub of Fergana with the ruins of Crashior, a major wizard-king citadel and a dominant source of wizard scrap (trade term for scavenged wizard-king artefacts); the two are both well east of Carrion, but with the dangerous wastes separating them (with some particularly nasty local dangers in those parts), trade in scrap is forced to use the western route, which chokes that entire trade fiercely considering the prices that scrap fetches down south.

    (For those not familiar with old school sandbox adventure negotiation procedure: those hooks all represent adventures, or adventure-like pastimes, that I personally am offering to run as GM if you find any of them worthwhile. I'm keeping most of my cards hidden for now regarding each individual adventure, of course, to maintain the fog of war; further knowledge about the detailed possibilities of each adventure waits upon intelligence gathering of whatever sort. You may consider the fact that I chose to trot these hooks up here instead of some of the ones you've seen earlier an accident of expressed interests - people have been speculating about ocean adventuring, for example - combined with my own.)
  • In this game, where at least you and Mike are GMs and it seems like anyone is welcome to just jump in and run stuff, how are map-rights negotiated?
  • I'm keen on rolling up a new character to join either of the seafaring adventures, or some other trekking. Starting somewhere and just moving into the wild east hoping to find a wizard-king ruin to loot sounds good enough (really happy-go-lucky characters), as does exploring the wastes hoping to map out a trade route or following Sniper Joe's map.

    Obviously I wouldn't mind playing out Lark's upcoming turf war in the Old Woods, but that can wait. This isn't just Lark's story.
  • Map rights are first come, first served, I understand. We'll just move stuff around if we need to clear conceptual space. Note that it's no big deal in the end even if an entire campaign map needs to be redrawn for some reason - Gygax did that to Greyhawk halfway through his campaign, for example, and I'd have a redraw waiting for me if we return to fantasy-Holland at some point in our historical fantasy campaign.

    My style of GMing, being pretty much about maximal player freedom and organically unfolding hints and rumours, tends to eat up real estate with vague sketching somewhat quickly. Anybody wants to set me straight about the geography, just go ahead. If it hasn't been seen in play, it's pretty much just speculation :D
  • edited April 2014
    I'm just interested in what happens when I take a character to Carrion and ask to see a map of the region. Do I force the DM's hand and get at least a coastline sketched out for me at that moment or do I get a collection of longer-range hints about what's out there but nothing concrete drawn out? Is a cartographer someone you can hunt out in Fantasy Europe?

    Also, I'm interested in place-names. As I've understood it with the first-come-first-served mentality going here Proper Nouns are all over the place. I tend to go generic - "The Seafort" - where Eero has pre-written/invents exotic nonsense - "the Tower of Duvan'Ku." It's going to be interesting when the map is inevitably redrawn about whose names get the official nod. I suppose this models the real world a little, every communities having a different terms for the same landmark.
  • In retrospect, "exotic nonsense" could be clever Finnish puns... Oh well, D&D was never a welcoming environment for poetry. There's a call-and-response procedural dungeon experience that creates an epic poem in the idiom of D&D somewhere in the back of my mind but for the most part those two brain hemispheres don't connect.
  • I'm just interested in what happens when I take a character to Carrion and ask to see a map of the region. Do I force the DM's hand and get at least a coastline sketched out for me at that moment or do I get a collection of longer-range hints about what's out there but nothing concrete drawn out? Is a cartographer someone you can hunt out in Fantasy Europe?
    Is this a question about the Grey Sands campaign or about our home game set in fantasy-Europe?

    Regarding the IRC game, assuming I was GMing and you were asking for a map in Carrion, I'd ask you back as to why you want it. If it's just general interest in the setting, then I'd invite the group to help draw one (rough features such as coastlines, interesting landmarks, etc.). If it was to ascertain some specific strategic point, I'd attempt to answer in the specific as well, without drawing out an entire map. If the adventure at hand basically required you to amass a lot of specific geographic information, I would sketch you a map (no need to expect perfect detail, of course) using the ordinary combination of means. Ideally I would of course already have the map at the ready, if I had been attracted to GM an adventure that required you to have a massive amount of geographic information.

    In the most drastic case I would call for recess while I worked out a map; as has been discussed in IRC, it is theoretically possible to run against the edge of the render zone in my sandbox GMing by moving very quickly, to a very unexpected direction, in a manner that makes play impossible to continue without major prep. (I won't claim that it is easy - I am pretty good at improvizational sandboxing by this point in the game.) Ending up in a situation where you absolutely have to have the best map available in Carrion, representing the entire northlands, would likely be exactly such a situation. In practice I'd suggest that we finish out the session playing something less labour-intensive, and then I'd come in with the map for the next session.

    In our home game I would generally have had geography worked out in advance for the immediate areas of interest, so I could answer questions about it without any fancy footwork. Of course there as well players could always ask questions that I did not have prepared answers for - that's an inherent state of GMing a sandbox campaign, though, so no big deal. My experience is that players are generally implicitly cooperative about these matters, which is also carried here in the Grey Sands game - nobody has felt a great need to push at the edges of the currently on-going simulation just for the sake of pushing it, even if most characters would have plenty of rights to have wider knowledge about the world if they were to just ask.
    Also, I'm interested in place-names. As I've understood it with the first-come-first-served mentality going here Proper Nouns are all over the place. I tend to go generic - "The Seafort" - where Eero has pre-written/invents exotic nonsense - "the Tower of Duvan'Ku." It's going to be interesting when the map is inevitably redrawn about whose names get the official nod. I suppose this models the real world a little, every communities having a different terms for the same landmark.
    It is entirely ordinary for things to have complex onomastic histories. I'm myself working backwards from proven cases in figuring out how the naming goes. For material I have player choices (particularly in character names), co-GM choices, the adventure module stuff I'm using (Duvan'Ku is an infamous thing of LotFP lore, for example - not a name I invented), and my own improvisations. Over time these turn into tendencies, which might end up so strong that they'll start overriding e.g. adventure modules. For example, I've sort of figured out that the southerners tend to have more biblical and generally European names, while fantastic sounding (and yes, Finnic) names are somewhat more likely for northerners, particularly low-class and rural people. Northerners are also more likely to have descriptive names, perhaps because our viewpoint is somewhat northern here, and thus we translate their language into English more often, or perhaps because the cultural purge following the wizard wars broke much of the continuity in the local culture, so that they tend towards simpler plain-speak naming conventions nowadays instead of using old classical language names so much.
  • A question for you Eero, if you can answer in a way that does not spoil the play in the IRC game: How many of those hooks that you are offering are backed by published modules, and how many are adventures from your own brain? And of the latter, to what extent are they very undefined and you expect to mostly improvise as opposed to more detailed planning?

    If you can't answer for these new hooks, perhaps you can talk about the adventures you have run so far this campaign, or in other campaigns.
  • I can answer, it's no hardship, especially as this IRC game is supposed to be a demonstrative exercise anyway. I think I answered this exact question in IRC last week regarding the adventures we've already seen in the campaign. For these hooks here, let's see... three are predicated on pre-existing material that is not adventure modules (meaning stuff like ready-made hexcrawl milieus with no particular adventure structures attached), one is an adventure I've written myself before (and playtested, too), four are basically improvisation exercises for me (although I might jot down some notes if I feel about it at some point), and there are about five specific adventure modules involved behind the rest of the hooks. Some of those are obviously such that there's room for me to fit in arbitrary adventures later on if I feel the need, and I do have some on the sidelines waiting for an appropriate place to introduce them. About half are such that if anybody else feels like GMing something related to those hooks, go right ahead - my ideas concerning them are easy enough to recycle and use somewhere else, insofar as I even have more than a confidence and curiousity regarding the specific subject.
  • About half are such that if anybody else feels like GMing something related to those hooks, go right ahead - my ideas concerning them are easy enough to recycle and use somewhere else, insofar as I even have more than a confidence and curiousity regarding the specific subject.
    This is the official call for a player (or potential player) quorum on sea hexploration adventure! I've got an interest (potentially to run, even) and I want to gauge the general mood. High Fantasy at Sea, Dawn Treader style.

  • edited April 2014
    I'm interested in this but I have limited time, other obligations and reside on a different continent. So it's probably tough to count on me.

    ETA: What I mean is, if you guys get up to this at a convenient time, I'm likely to stop in and play.
  • In this game, where at least you and Mike are GMs and it seems like anyone is welcome to just jump in and run stuff, how are map-rights negotiated?
    As long as everyone knows in advance and a new activity isn't poaching time from another then I don't see why not. That said, it's not my channel, so maybe their response will be different?
  • edited April 2014
    Yes, I think the basic idea here is to let everyone do as they like, with the unofficial courtesy of trying to leave space for (or incorporate) stuff other GMs have been working on but hasn't yet been mapped. So, for instance, Eero's been talking about Irllendom for a while, so I'd imagine most GMs would either avoid placing it on the map, or, if forced to, would place it somewhere appropriate to what Eero has described so far.

    I can imagine a FEW problems potentially cropping up through this method, but none of them seem all that dangerous.

    On an unrelated sidenote, I've been thinking about the hit point pool idea I mentioned earlier and fooling around with it some more. I don't think anyone reading actually cares, but I'm going to describe my latest idea, just for completeness. Feel free to stop reading if you're not interested in this! It's getting less and less D&D-like, I'll admit.

    I think so far my favourite version of it is pretty simple: when a monster attacks, it rolls its damage (almost always a d6, I think), and the player rolls their die pool.

    Any dice which do not beat the incoming damage are discarded from the pool. When you run out of dice, you're probably dead (follow your usual rules for running out of hit points). If you matched the damage total with your highest die, then you're just knocked out (like 0 HP).

    So, for instance, your pool is d8+3d6+d4. You get hit, the monster rolls a 3 for damage. You roll a 5, a 4, a 3, a 2, and a 1. You discard the 3, 2, and 1, leaving you with two dice. You get hit again, and you roll two 5s, but the monster rolls a 4. This time, it's just a flesh wound. The third blow is a 5; you roll a 6 and a 1. So you discard the 1, leaving you with one die. The fourth strike is 3 damage and you roll a 3 - you're knocked out.

    It's much more random than the other methods (any blow can kill you, and even when you're severely wounded you can get hit several times and survive if you roll well), but an interesting application of hit dice. It would work really well for monsters' Hit Dice, I think, since the GM doesn't have to track any numbers, but can just leave the dice on the table.
  • I'm down for some wavecrawling, if the timing works out (I'm in California, and the difference from GMT has meant I've only made one session so far). When is the next session going to happen?
  • I was assuming sunday 10 pm my local time, because that's when things have started when I've dropped in previously. I guess that works out to 8 pm (20:00) GMT? I'll be available from 6 pm GMT through pretty much all night, since next week my school's out for spring break.
  • The usual official starting time has been 10pm GMT, but apparently just about everybody thinks that it should be earlier, so I've no idea whose idea that even was in the first place. From my viewpoint the supposed starting time doesn't matter that much, the game starts anyway when enough people show up, no matter what's been declared the official starting time. The nature of this game is such that one doesn't exactly need to wait for another player to play their turn.

    As Jonatan says, the practical start has often occurred at about 8pm GMT, which is still almost reasonable for us here in mid-European zones. Some people seem to only come in at like 12pm GMT, which is likely a feature of the trans-Atlantic time-zone contrast (for the Americans that's barely in the evening). Basically, a four-hour zone during which players show up, and play has usually been going for hours when the last ones show.

    Being early gives one quite a bit of voting power on the question of "what are we going to do tonight", because you can present the later arrivals with a fait accompli - an already prepped and logistically defined adventuring scenario that's just getting to the good stuff. It is also useful for having time to do maintenance and solo adventuring, if your characters have outlying concerns that are appropriate to be dealt with outside the context of an organized adventuring party. These are, of course, things that can also be addressed several days in advance of a session, like we did with Debby's cake-baking exercise a few days back. Just get on the channel and see if you can find appropriate co-plotters to verify your prep.
  • Damned piggy children!
  • Game today at 6 GMT, I *think.* That's in an hour or so.

    Also, if your character happens to be at the Hidden Trollop, be sure to ask the GM about the hunt for hidden magical cake. One of the kids who participated in the hunt disappeared into the woods singing, but it should otherwise be fine.
  • Six? Jeezey petes! Some of us are still in the office. I'll pop my head in mid-game. If there's a space at the table I'll fill it!
  • Seems like Daumantas will run the game, then :D

    I can't play tonight, I have literature club until 10pm GMT or so. Thursdays are like that this spring.

    As for the magic cake, a character visiting the Trollop has a 50% chance of finding a peace of this Easter treat by accident, and may eat it, should they have the courage to eat invisible found food. It does smell delicious, though. A character who has specific information that causes him to actively search for the cake can find up to 1d6 slices no prob in different parts of the grounds at the Trollop; the only party that knows to search for the cake actively at this point are the Trollop children, though, used as they are to the antics of the house elf when Easter approaches.
  • Haha, I thought you were the one running it, Mike? And seeing how it seems I'd be the only one around, I can probably just wait for you to pop up.
  • So when is the next time that someone actually intends to run a game if players show up?
  • Right now, in fact. We're in Carrion, and you're welcome to join in before the poor fools anger a powerful thieves' guild.

    But Sunday is the day that has been speculated about in this thread.
  • If only I didn't have to work! Maybe you'll play late and I'll join in after the guild has been angered.
  • We'll be playing tonight, apparently. Perhaps with more luck than in Friday's mob caper. Getting on a boat has been discussed, but nobody has a boat yet, so we'll see what happens.
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