Who else discovered gaming as an adult?

edited June 2013 in The Sandbox
I played my first RPG at the age of 23. I'd just moved to a new area with my job and I met some guys that were into it. I caught on with quickly and now I'm way more hardcore than any of the guys that I started with.

Nearly everyone loves to boast about how they started GMing at 11 years old or whatever but what was your way in if you weren't one of the kids?

Comments

  • I played my first RPG at 19. I had just moved to Hamburg from a far smaller town and one of my fellow students asked me if I wanted to play Vampire (Masquerade). I didn't really have an idea what I was getting into, but why not. It sounded like fun and as a goth, Vampire was pretty much the ideal game to draw me in ;)
    I met almost all my friends through roleplaying, especially after being introduced into a weekly group that I still play with. I held out on GMing until I was 33, although now I have no idea why that took so long.
  • I didn't start until I went to graduate school, mostly due to not having a critical mass of potential players around. I was familiar with the concept (and had read plenty of rules) but didn't actually get to play until my late twenties. Which meant that my first actual play experience was GMing a Burning Wheel campaign. I didn't get to be a player until slightly later.
  • edited June 2013
    I got into modern boardgaming in 2009 age 45, and RPGs a year later. It's made it difficult for me in some ways, forex I've had to learn not just the 'language' of roleplaying, i.e. expressions like task resolution, skill checks, OOC, initiative order, fluff, flavour and crunch etc., but also the tropes that people who have been roleplaying since they were at school take for granted, and which also form part of the roleplayer's argot, such as bags of holding and so forth. I've absorbed a huge amount over the last three years, but even now I find it hard to join in some conversations because I don't get the references to the various games being talked about.

    On the plus side, having come to RPGs at the tail end of the indie explosion, and having thus been exposed immediately to the kinds of narrative, GMless and high bleed games that get talked about here (my first ever RPG was a game of Dogs in the Vineyard, facilitated by Indie Pete, as he was then known, at Indiecon in November 2010), I don't ever have to play any combat-heavy rules monsters if I don't want to. And another curious thing: I'm very interested in the theory and practice of game design, and so I've also absorbed a bit more rapidly the lingo of the more modern games, and the way they're talked about, which means that occasionally when I'm in a conversation with seasoned veterans, they don't get my references. It's a bit bizarre. In the last few weeks, during the pre-game chat at a home group Space 1889 game I've been in since early this year, I've floored the GM, who's more or less stuck to TSR-type games since he was at school, with terms such as granularity and ashcan. A couple of weeks ago he even asked me what BRP meant.
  • edited June 2013
    I've absorbed a huge amount over the last three years, but even now I find it hard to join in some conversations because I don't get the references to the various games being talked about.
    This resonates with me. Technically my first exposure to roleplaying games was in childhood - I'd played exactly one thrown-together session of AD&D 2.5 (I think) when I was about 12 or 13 on a boy scout camping trip. But I don't really count that, because after that either I couldn't find friends that wanted to play or, slightly more common, my friends that were already playing didn't think I was cool enough to join in their campaigns. So I spent a few years drooling over the books I bought, creating hundreds of characters that would never be used, and playing adventures in my mind.

    It wasn't until 2009 or so (age ~24) that I got to play in a real campaign, which happened to be Burning Wheel run by my buddy @cathexis. To this day I can't have a conversation about games with him without him saying something I don't understand. Happens to me at conventions, too. But I don't mind it - it helps me grow as a gamer. But yeah, it wasn't until adulthood that it actually became a hobby as opposed to a fantasy. (Though, in keeping with my roots, I still occasionally have fun making characters for games that I'll likely never get to play...)

  • edited June 2013
    I'd never played an RPG when I ran D&D 3.5 at the age of 23. I'd had the books for a few years, and I was working with high school students, putting on a regular game night. They were all excited about D&D, so we gave it a go.

    My path to interest in D&D was, on the one hand, discovering Lord of the Rings when I was 15 or so, then promptly following it up with Dragonlance novels (which I thought were amazing). On the other hand, I was heavily into console JRPGs, and progressively interested in more and more obscure and technical aspects of those games, which led me to the most obscure and technical RPG of all (from the perspective of videogames): D&D.
  • And another curious thing: I'm very interested in the theory and practice of game design, and so I've also absorbed a bit more rapidly the lingo of the more modern games, and the way they're talked about, which means that occasionally when I'm in a conversation with seaoned veterans, they don't get my references. It's a bit bizarre.
    I can relate to that! It's really weird.
  • I only started playing about 3 years ago now, at the age of 24. Although technically I did play a few sessions of D&D with my dad and uncle when I was in elementary school - that didn't last long though. So yeah, coming into the hobby and wanting to design games has been hard in terms of all the jargon and history being hard to catch up on but I don't see it as a bad thing, I think my ignorance brought a fresh perspective that led to Magicians so it's worked out ok so far!
  • I started when I had 23, because a friend of mine was into Vampire and always had a cool story about his last session and a mystery to discover for the next. It took a year for an space to open in the next campaign of his group and when the GM started to mis sessions I was so excited about all the different RPGs I found that I started GMing Palladium's Robotech, hacking the game and one of it's modules for my campaign.

    Then, after playing in a good D&D campaign that turned later into a munchkin-fest, a poor railroading excuse of a plot and an eternal discussion with our GM I lost the love for trad games and went deeper into indie games, minimalistic design and hacking trad games with indie mechanics (since my group of players doesn't share my interest for indie games) Today I still do the same and from time to time, I introduce people of my age (35) anto the hobby.
  • I did play a few sessions of D&D in middle school, but myself and my significant other got into gaming as adults in graduate school. Something about having a designer as a roommate...
  • I wanted to play a tabletop so badly since i was a highschool kid, but i hadnt much friends back then; and the ones i had looked down to the idea; i think that because it sounded "nerdy", and that wasn't good back then. I only managed to play a session i'll remember all my life with some weird kids where i played a bard. I had to wait until 25 to start playing seriously (im 30 now). I dont have plans to retire, in fact i love to spend my time making hacks, and whole new games just for the sake of doing it (though my players are very hard to drive out of the cyberpunk genre).
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