Are OSR-style play and Story Now play really antithetical?

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  • The problem with a thread like this is that, at this point, storygames is even worse than rpg.net for discussing Story Now or any other Creative Agenda (or any kind of Forge Theory). If someone ask something about that, he always get a long pointless thread full of flames, posturing, people ranting against Ron Edwards, the Forge or the idea that system matter, and a lot of really confusing and contradictory definitions about what theory terms mean.

    By the other hand, "OSR" can really mean anything, in Big Model terms.

    So he question at the base of this thread is "this undefined thing can be compatible with something that most of you don't know what it is?". And chaos ensues.

    If the thread opener is still interested in his question, my suggestion is to drop both "OSR" and "story now" and simply use a couple practical examples about what he wants: "I like to play like this, but I want to get this, it's possible to get both at the same time?"

    If he is interested in learning what the Big Model really say, I suggest instead that he follow the advice lumpley gave him a lot of post above.
  • Deliverator: So what happens, I propose, is that every given group playing D&D is going to (a) figure out which side of the line they prefer, and play there; (b) wander back and forth across the line seamlessly, as Zak says (the old Forge idea of the "instance of play" is useful here); or (c) get all muddled up by the line, and not be able to figure out why sometimes the game's fun and sometimes it isn't.

    So yeah, a local play culture of type (a) where "D&D players aren't interested in morality in gaming," totally happens. Elsewhere there are local play cultures of type (a) where D&D is a great medium for fantasy drama and melodrama. Woe to the kid who moves across town and tries to join a D&D group there! That kid's going to find out that to other people, D&D is a different, incompatible game.
  • edited March 2012
    Posted By: Moreno R.
    So he question at the base of this thread is "this undefined thing can be compatible with something that most of you don't know what it is?". And chaos ensues.

    If the thread opener is still interested in his question, my suggestion is to drop both "OSR" and "story now" and simply use a couple practical examples about what he wants: "I like to play like this, but I want to get this, it's possible to get both at the same time?"
    I think your post was pretty impolite, and largely uncalled for. I was interested in the discussion started from a planted seed; I was not necessarily seeking a one, true answer. And I also think the horse died a pretty natural and peaceful death before you came along and kicked at it.

    I'm satisfied that this thread can be closed and we can all move on to something else.
  • Posted By: lumpleyDeliverator: So what happens, I propose, is that every given group playing D&D is going to (a) figure out which side of the line they prefer, and play there; (b) wander back and forth across the line seamlessly, as Zak says (the old Forge idea of the "instance of play" is useful here); or (c) get all muddled up by the line, and not be able to figure out why sometimes the game's fun and sometimes it isn't.

    So yeah, a local play culture of type (a) where "D&D players aren't interested in morality in gaming," totally happens. Elsewhere there are local play cultures of type (a) where D&D is a great medium for fantasy drama and melodrama. Woe to the kid who moves across town and tries to join a D&D group there! That kid's going to find out that to other people, D&D is a different, incompatible game.
    I agree with your first proposition, with the caveat that a group doesn't necessarily need an understanding of a theoretical framework to guide their own search for more fun over less fun. People who play games are pretty good at learning to know what kind of games they like and don't like, what kind of play style they like, and don't like. Sometimes, they're not, and then sometimes they seek to find out why by asking or learning. Sometimes they just stop and do something else with their time.

    On your second point, I wouldn't necessarily say "Woe". Sometimes, the kid moving across town might say, "Wow! this isn't the same game, but I like this game too!" Sometimes, the kid might even think the game is the same, really, but it can accomodate more than one way of playing.

    And thanks for bringing this comment to the table; I guess maybe the discussion isn't entirely a dead horse after all.
  • I agree with all your caveats in full.
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