Calling all gaming podcasters

edited July 2011 in Story Games
Please if you are a gaming podcaster, and there are many of you now, and you interview someone about a game, please discuss the mechanics in some detail. We are geeks, we listen to these things because we like that sort of thing, and we want see if we like the system. It may be just me, but I really enjoy that sort of thing. Please?

Comments

  • I always wonder where to draw that line, I'm never sure how much 'crunch' (so to speak) is valuable to the audience. Though our discussions about our Lady Blackbird / Earthdawn hack didn't involve any interviews, we were very trepidatious about how they would be received - so much so that we included disclaimers at the beginning to warn off potential angry listeners...I kind of regret that now, as we received mostly positive feedback (and both parts were downloaded in roughly equal measure, so I assume those who listened to part 1 went on to download part 2 - although that's just a hunch).

    When I listen to game designers, though - yeah...I totally enter a sort of zen-like state of bliss when mechanics enter the discussion.
  • Huh, that can apply to actual play podcasts as well as interviews. Actual People, Actual Play is an excellent example of that.
    --
    TAZ
  • edited July 2011
    Posted By: AlexMayoour discussions about our Lady Blackbird / Earthdawn hack
    Another request for gaming podcasters: if you casually mention an episode wherein you talk about something relevant to a thread, how about posting a fucking link to it, or two, so hundreds of people don't have to google for five minutes each to find your work. Especially if you don't link to your site in your user profile.

    Thank you.
  • edited July 2011
    It's more important to talk about the important things in the game than the mechanics? Not all games have really important mechanics? If I had 5 minutes to tell you about Over the Edge, the mechanics would not make the list.

    The podcast I'm on:

    * is an enthusiast's podcast, so no in-depth criticism, I try to match the game to someone who would like it
    * has nobody else who really follows RPGs with the detail that I do, so most of the time talking about a game in detail is me monologuing instead of conversing, which is the format of the show

    I'd be thrilled to talk about more mechanics, but with who?
  • @ Wordman - Sorry, my bad - duly noted.
  • Posted By: JDCorleyIf I had 5 minutes to tell you about Over the Edge, the mechanics would not make the list.
    And while not entirely fair, and it may certainly be just me, I will not care about anything you just said until you get to the mechanics of the game.
    If the first person to show me Dogs told me the story concepts about it I would have laughed my ass off at them. Fortunately they did not, they told me in great detail how the mechanics play out, and I immediately went and grabbed it. If told you about this awesome setting and concepts for the game, and the mechanics are taken from Rifts...well?
  • edited July 2011
    Posted By: thadrine
    And while not entirely fair, and it may certainly be just me, I will not care about anything you just said until you get to the mechanics of the game.
    *shrug* Then that may not be the podcast for you. Seriously, you can't expect every podcast to conform to your particular wants and expectations.

    "Is it too much to ask that every RPG podcast do things the way I want them to?" Actually, yes.
  • Posted By: Mike_Olson"Is it too much to ask that every RPG podcast do things the way I want them to?" Actually, yes.
    I know that is why it is much more a "Please if you would?"
  • We listen to podcasts for very different reasons, Thadrine.

    If I want to hear about a game's rules, I just read the game's rules. What I want from a podcast is that which is unique to the medium - people conversing about their play experiences and perspectives, in a conversation that I'm not a part of but still get to eavesdrop on.
  • @thadrine

    Well - to further add to my earlier response:

    While the game-designer part of my brain lights up like the 4th of July when people talk mechanics, I don't consider it to be the end-all, be-all when I'm actually listening to game designers, nor when I interview them. On our last episode we interviewed Jake Richmond of Atarashi Games, and designer of Panty Explosion Perfect and GxB. We touched on the mechanics of the various games, mostly about how the new edition of Panty Explosion differs from the first - but frankly, I was more interested in the design goals behind PEP and GxB than the mechanics. Both of those games are designed to deliver specific kinds of gameplay based on fairly widespread anime tropes, and while there may have been some value in chatting at length about what dice are used and how the mechanics work, we were less interested in the nuts and bolts and more interested in hearing Jake's thoughts about genre emulation and the issues brought up by bridging the gap between the gaming and anime subcultures. In the case of GxB, there are very few mechanics to speak of.

    Although we didn't explicitly describe the game's mechanics, I think our discussion gives you a good grip on whether or not the games are your cup of tea. We pretty thoroughly discussed the kind of gameplay the ruleset engenders and supports. If you really have a burning need to know the crunch, buy the book - it's a modest $16 and I'm sure Jake would appreciate the sale. Failing that, we see each other at game meetups on a fairly regular basis - if you want to check out the book, I'd be happy to let you have a look at it next time I see you.
  • Applause to Thadrine for crying out for more mechanics. Sometimes I need to read a book as well as hearing it discussed.

    I have a suggestion too, but it's not on topic: thread split
  • @Alex, I will have have to check out that episode, it is something I have been interested in. Admittedly because it has a very provocative name.
  • @thadrine LoL - one of the things we discussed was the potential of the name to turn away potential customers :P I do find the name amusing, but it's not very evocative of the actual gameplay (it certainly doesn't say 'You can use this to play Space Marines!')
  • Thanks for the feedback, Seth.

    Canon Puncture probably isn't the show for you to get to hear too much crunch and specific mechanics talk. Actual Play shows like Actual People, Actual Play and The Walking Eye might be your cup of tea.
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