Comedy and Story Games

edited December 2010 in Story Games
Howdy folks! Long time no see.

So, I've been playing a lot of games in the last few months and the most popular in the group are either games that are comedic in premise or devolve into comedy fairly rapidly. A Vampire game set in the 40s has been a returning favourite, with more than a little Inglorious Bastards and 'Allo 'Allo mixed in.

Now, I'm always trying to get a few story games into the gaming roster (a few hits, a few misses; such is life) - so the logical step forward is to try blend laughs with narrative/progressive gaming techniques.

Does anyone having any thoughts on comedy's place in games that are naturally focused on plot-progression? Or, indeed, recommendations on story games that are inherently funny?

Comments

  • There are nine games listed in the Humor category of the SG wiki, with varying definitions of "humor", so that's a place to start. That list is missing InSpectres, which is a very funny game. And Best Friends. And Grey Ranks. I could go on!

    I don't know what you mean by "naturally focused on plot progression" but I like funny games.
  • Time and Temp made my laugh so hard, it gave me a headache.

    Also, Jason's being coy. Fiasco is a game of dark comedy, like Oh Brother, Where Art Thou or The Big Lebowski.

  • Fiasco is easy, awesome, and bulletproof in its comedic offerings.

    To add to Joshua's list, it's also like Burn After Reading, The Maiden Heist and Superbad.
    If you were to play the "a nice Southern Town" playset and rolls lots of 4s and 6s, it could be American Pie.
    With the right playset, it could be Being John Malkovich or Adaptation.
  • Nasocorn is generally found to be funny.
  • What I tend to do to create comedy in a story game is to say "be funny", then play everything I do absolutely straight. Fiasco, for example, works a million times better when there is one poor shlub who just doesn't get what's going on and plods along serving up softballs for everyone else to mash.
  • Posted By: JDCorleyFiasco, for example, works a million times better when there is one poor shlub who just doesn't get what's going on and plods along serving up softballs for everyone else to mash.
    100% true. I try to play this guy as often as I can as well, although sometimes my friends beat me to it.

    Everyone trying to be hilarious will never be hilarious.
  • I'm working on a new game that includes comedy as a basic play element. "Madness" will be a series of games about Cthulhu adventures played in two parts. The first part is Investigation - to learn what evil wickedness is out there that has to be stopped! The second part is Adventure - in which the players go out and kick monster butt (but in which they really describe horrible mind twisting visions (which make them insane but which give them actions in the next investigation phase) and make jokes (to try and reduce their insanity and keep themselves going in the face of the true reality of the world.)

    For something to happen in the game it can either be put there by the players (as a designer you can't rely on that or even expect it) or be put there by the designer. I find that people do what they are rewarded for doing and which accomplishes something tangible. That is why I'm making seeing horror materially aid investigation - and making humor reduce insanity. I think this should work but I haven't written the rules yet so....

    Chris Engle
  • Everyone trying to be hilarious will never be hilarious.

    So true. It would be nice to figure out how to build this into situation generation in a game.

Sign In or Register to comment.