Sometimes you just want to kill crackers

edited March 2010 in Story Games
Wouldn't it be fun to play a game where you were like Apaches slaughtering women and children in their beds? Has anybody ever played anything like this?

Comments

  • At least then you'd be fighting the bad guys. :)
  • Sounds like a 3:16 hack. But may I say? Yuck.
  • edited March 2010
    Man, you know what, I love those old John Wayne movies, especially the funny ones where they trip horses with wires. I wish I could play a game like that.
  • The last time we played Steal Away Jordan, it was definitely like this.

    Graham
  • Now THAT idea might actually be cathartic, yeah.
  • edited March 2010
    The purpose of this thread is lost on me.

    Jesse
  • Posted By: JesseThe purpose of this thread is lost on me.

    Jesse
    No it isn't.
  • Posted By: John PowellBut may I say? Yuck.
    Dude, the capacity to enjoy the idea of inflicting violence on someone else is part of our psyche.
  • Seriously? Does taking people's statements out of context in order to imply that they're a racist make you feel clever?
  • Context or no, certain subtleties are lost on some people. Out of context, both statements have a troll-like quality.

    But please let's not turn this into another "unpleasant and disruptive forum behaviour" thread please.
  • I find this thread satisfying, even though I know it's not good for anyone. Like high fructose corn syrup.
  • Posted By: droogHas anybody ever played anything like this?
    Once, when I was a teenager: It was Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, in After the Bomb. We were the bad guys. It was cute, lame and bloody, albeit not very satisfying.

    -Andy
  • When I was little (9-12 years old) and we played "cowboys and indians", nobody ever wanted to play the cowboys. They were the bad guys, and in our games they were always killed by the indians.

    But it was a game very low on violence ("pam, you are dead"), and our cowboys never had wives or children, so I don't know it this qualify...
  • edited March 2010
    I wrote a chunk of a D&D 3.5 setting which was set during a rough analogue to American colonization. The humans mapped to the imperial or confederate Indian groups (Iroquois, Cherokee, Aztec), the halflings to the mound-dwellers, and the elves to deep-wilderness people. The humanoids were mapped to european powers: The Orcs to the English and Americans, Hobgoblins the Spanish, Goblins the French (less common creatures mapped to nationalities less common in the Americas: I think Germans were Ogres.) Africans were Dwarves, and Jews were Gnomes.

    The technology levels were roughly equivalent: so the Orcs had muskets and the beginnings of industrialism and great sailing ships, whereas the PCs had bows, spears, and hand-axes, to start at least.

    The idea was that you would do adventures in order to help or defend your nation, which would be benefited or hindered by your success or failure. Over time, you could "unlock" the ability to have, say, Dwarf PCs, or to produce your own guns, or whatever. There was a way that players could plan adventures beforehand, basically telling the GM to "prep a fort next time" or whatever. That was neat.

    Also I had a cool idea for the alignment system: it was assumed that all PCs were working to help the tribe. So instead, "Lawful vs. Chaotic" became "working inside the nation vs. working outside the nation" and "Good vs. Evil" became "traditional life versus adopting the ways of the invaders." So, for instance, you could use guns, but to get proficiency you had to be non-good, and to get specialization you had to be evil. I thought that was neat: a way that a Lawful Good character and a Chaotic Evil character could be in the same party and work together, each with their own niche.

    Then 4e came out and I never really bothered to try to adapt my notes.

    yrs--
    --Ben
  • I once played a Pagan Shore Ireland game set in Pendragon in which the PCs were pretty much out to destroy Arthur, his knights, and everything he stood for. Because if they didn't then they'd be the ones on their knees, starving and enslaved.

    It was pretty amazing how fast it turned into the IRA in the year 500, given that the players started out wanting to be heroic.
  • I am pulling together some ideas for a role-playing game to be called The New World. It will be a colonization game, but it will the antithesis of games like Civilization IV and those of its ilk, which read history as a story of constant technological progress and civil advancement. I'm going to borrow from places like Jared Diamond's Collapse and recent ethnohistorical accounts of pre-Columbian and early post-contact America to write a game that's about a "New World" that emerges at the intersection of multiple "Old Worlds," European, African, and Native American. I'll rely on the notion that, in the early days at least, many colonies failed, with survivors returning home or making new homes in native societies. I have this vision of the game playing out in five-year turns against a backdrop of societies on both sides of the Atlantic under different levels of stress of one sort or another, with your role-playing of significant moments for your character within that turn serving to exemplify, embody or instantiate (um, represent and resolve) the larger socio-political and economic changes.

    So over the course of the game, your character can be shipwrecked, go native, return home, accompany an expedition back to the "New World," and die in a massacre, and that will represent the trends in the larger narrative at hand--trends which don't necessarily map on to teleological narratives of American history (e.g., Manifest Destiny), but which should be fun to explore.
  • With the Official Avatar Roleplaying Game, you too will be able to recreate the adventures of Jake Sully, a white man that integrates himself with ignorant noble savages and, with his white man talents, leads them to victory against the other white men!

    Kill crackers the colonialist way!

  • Posted By: droogWouldn't it be fun to play a game where you were like Apaches slaughtering women and children in their beds? Has anybody ever played anything like this?
    Well, I hate women and children, so pretty much every game I play is like this.
  • Isn't this a significant part of Shadowrun?
  • Posted By: JohnstonePosted By: droogWouldn't it be fun to play a game where you were like Apaches slaughtering women and children in their beds? Has anybody ever played anything like this?
    Well, I hate women and children, so pretty much every game I play is like this.

    White man came across the sea
    He brought us pain and misery
    He killed our tribes, he killed our creed
    He took our game for his own need

    We fought him hard we fought him well
    Out on the plains we gave him hell
    But many came too much for Cree
    Oh will we ever be set free?

    Riding through dustclouds and barren wastes
    Galloping hard on the plains
    Chasing the redskins back to their holes
    Fighting them at their own game
    Murder for freedom a stab in the back
    Women and children the cowards attack!
  • edited March 2010
    Posted By: jenskotIsn't this a significant part of Shadowrun?
    No, Shadowrun is the game where Magical Indians and Magical Elves and Rock N Roll Orcs* fight against Evil Corporate Dragon Zombies who represent the soul of the MAN.

    No murdering of children is involved.


    *Like in the Patti Smith Song "Rock n Roll Orc" right?
  • Posted By: Brand_RobinsNo, Shadowrun is the game where Magical Indians and Magical Elves and Rock N Roll Orcs fight against Evil Corporate Dragon Zombies who represent the soul of the MAN.

    No murdering of children is involved.
    Well, occasionally dragon children are murdered. Or commit murder.
Sign In or Register to comment.