Ravenkult Stock Art Store (buy my art for your game re-launch!)

It's that time of the year again (the time to promote my stuff that is)!

Over at my new, fancier store, you can buy stock art for your creations and download the print ready files immediately afterwards. For the next month, use coupon code ''storygames'' to get 50% off any purchase.

All downloads are offered in .jpg, with .tiff files available if you ask for them (the .tiff files are too big to host).

Ravenkult Store
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Comments

  • Out of idle curiousity, why don't you licence a game to use with your art instead of the other way around? Is it just that you don't care about the publishing side of things?
  • I don't quite get what you mean Eero. Pay someone to make a game and use my art with it?
  • Well, yes. That's what you're suggesting for the designer to do in the thread title, aren't you?

    I'm not a visual artist myself, so I just started to wonder for some reason about it: how come you're asking me to buy your art for my game instead of soliciting for a game to publish with your art. Is there some particular reason aside from tradition?

    Of course this is totally off-topic, so no need to pursue an answer if you don't feel like it.
  • edited February 2010
    Well, the same way someone commissions me to do art for his game, I'm offering stock art for low prices. It's a way for me to make a profit on art I've created that I wouldn't feel right selling to someone as ''new''. Obviously this is aimed at designers who have a product and need art for their game.

    As for doing the opposite, it's harder than you think. You have to find a designer who is willing to create a game based on your art. I am actually working on something like that right now though.


    edit: If you mean actually commissioning a game designer to make a game and then selling it myself, I don't think there's a single person out there that would create a game for a one-off payment.
  • edited February 2010
    Eero, your perspective is weird. He is advertising his photographs that you can pay him to use in your games. He's trying to make money. He's doing what tons of artists and photographers have done before. I'm not sure what you're getting at.

    If you want to make a directed self promotion, "Buy my game for your art," go right ahead man.
  • Posted By: Bret GillanEero, your perspective is weird. He is advertising his photographs illustrations that you can pay him to use in your games. He's trying to make money. He's doing what tons of artists and photographers have done before. I'm not sure what you're getting at.
    :)
  • I'm just making idle conversation here. I guess that title inspired me, making me think that an artist with excess art could just as well take the lead himself in developing the game product instead of waiting for somebody else to do it. Bear with it.

    Thinking of designers willing to make a game on commission... I don't know if it's any more unlikely than art on commission, in the end. Probably just rarer because wanting a game to carry your art is such a niche want to have - when you have art, it's not like you can't use it in other ways, you don't need a game specifically for it. But if you did, I'm sure there would be ways. For instance, generic and adaptable systems can make for potentially very short design cycles for entirely valid games. I could see myself making a game on commission on a chassis of something I know, such as D&D or Solar System or something like that.

    Speaking of art and using it, what sort of games might make use of George's art here? I'm asking because my own current projects are pretty far to the opposite direction in terms of mood... I guess it'd be something WoDish, maybe?
  • The problem is mostly that the art doesn't have a thematic center. It would only fit a very specific kind of game. Unless you just used 1 piece of art for the cover or something.

    I haven't really thought about commissioning a designer. Would a game designer be willing to create a game for say....100$ and then give up all profits to the artist? Wouldn't the artist have to be interested in publishing the game in question and in the type of game being made? It sounds a bit complicated to me.

    What I did though is approach a couple of game designers and suggest I make some art around a game they'd design, without any money exchanging hands. I'm in the process of creating art for it right now.
    Posted By: Eero Tuovinen

    Speaking of art and using it, what sort of games might make use of George's art here? I'm asking because my own current projects are pretty far to the opposite direction in terms of mood... I guess it'd be something WoDish, maybe?
    These particular pieces? They've seen use in Daniel Bayn's Secrets and Lies, Covenant and Urbanimus.
    Two of them appeared in Rafael's latest game, Spite.
  • Ah, I thought that I'd seen some of that somewhere. Must have been in Spite.

    That's interesting, an artist taking the initiative like that. As for cheap design... well, I could imagine a $100 game design, actually. It might not include development and writing, but it also might - artists do work at hobby prices, so why not a game designer? I could see myself doing enough game design for a small game relying on an existing system for a $100. Something akin to those more elaborate forum threads about "How do I play Warhammer with TSoY", essentially. I do some pretty serious design in that sort of thread now and then unprovoked, so can't see why not do similar for pay.

    Have to admit that the creative drive is pretty naturally the other way around normally, though.
  • Posted By: northerainI haven't really thought about commissioning a designer. Would a game designer be willing to create a game for say....100$ and then give up all profits to the artist? Wouldn't the artist have to be interested in publishing the game in question and in the type of game being made? It sounds a bit complicated to me.
    I personally wouldn't design (& develop & playtest) a game to someone else's specs for less than $1000. Even then, I couldn't guarantee it would be good, or anywhere near my best work.
    I doubt that someone else with a game design/publication CV would give you more certainty, or expect less money.

    In short, I'm not sure that Eero's idea would float very far, though it's an interesting one. It's kind of like saying "Oh, I've got all this beautiful hand-planed hardwood lumber, that I logged out of my own back yard with my stallion. Instead of selling these raw materials to contractors, I'll just hire someone to come up with an interesting thing to build with them, and then to build it."

    Now, if you knew this cool person (say, Ronald Gesher) who has written a few games you really like (say, "Dying Alone" and the prize-winning "Dragons Are Forever"), and you had a specific idea for a game that you were really juiced about... then that's a different story, perhaps. Having friends and collaborating is awesome, but that takes a certain spark, and a certain luck, and creative compatibility, and mutual enthusiasm... and it's a lot more variables than "hire a designer".
  • Posted By: northerainAs for doing the opposite, it's harder than you think. You have to find a designer who is willing to create a game based on your art. I am actually working on something like that right now though.
    Before I say anything else, let me say I have no problem at all with what you're doing (except that I can't afford any art at the moment, but that's nobody's fault hehe.) That being said, I would LOVE to be contracted to make a game about someone's art, provided that it's good art, and I get paid a reasonable amount for it. I suspect a lot of other game designers would say the same.

    $100 isn't really workable though, as JoePub said. With me, $100 would get you about five pages of manuscript at Letter size, maybe a bit more if I got a good amount of artistic freedom. It all depends on what you're expecting really. There are a few good games out there that are that short, so who knows? I think JoePub's estimate of $1000 is a pretty decent offer for an Indie game from a good designer. You could probably get 100 pages (half-letter size) for that kind of fee.

    That's the problem with writing though. With art, you can break it up easily into smaller portions (individual pictures) to be bought one at a time slowly over a period of time. Writing, well, it's going to be one great big lump that's not easily split in the mind. I can well understand someone balking at the idea of paying $1000 to have a game designed, because it's not easy to make a profit even out of a good RPG. It's for similar reasons that we designers have such difficulty paying a fair fee to artists for their work.

    This is an interesting topic, maybe we should split it off into a thread of its own?

    -Ash
  • The 100$ price tag was simply an example. I'm aware that any game of decent size would cost many times more. At the same time, that's the difference here. I'm selling multiple instances of illustrations, at cheap prices. Hell, I've offering 50% off on top of that.
    But that's my point, I can't afford to hire a game designer (nor does anyone else I think) because you can't buy bite-sized games. Maybe if you made a Lady Blackbird one...hm...
  • Posted By: northerainI'm selling multiple instances of illustrations, at cheap prices. Hell, I've offering 50% off on top of that.
    And that's another point of course, presumably you'll be selling each image more than once. Can't really do that with most RPG writing. It's doubtful that you'd even be able to do it with a game's system, which can feasibly be used in more than one product. Too many high quality freebie alternatives on the market.

    -Ash
  • I hate to sound like a broken record, but: Needs more black and white art!

    Almost all art in game books is on the inside, and very few games are printing in color.

    yrs--
    --Ben
  • Good point, although due to the nature of my medium, turning work into black and white is easy.
  • Didn't I just outline above how a $100 game would be feasible? You re-use existing design (universal systems are that) and leave the writing (arranging the ideas into coherent text) and development (playtesting and fine-tuning) for the buyer. It wouldn't be a large game, but then not every game needs to be. Something like this would be entirely doable.

    Color is not necessarily a problem if your medium is electronic. Speaking of which - did these have some licensing terms somewhere that I missed? Do you intend these to be usable for print and electronic publications both?
  • Single use for a product, print and electronic makes no difference.
  • Posted By: Eero TuovinenDidn't I just outline above how a $100 game would be feasible? You re-use existing design (universal systems are that) and leave the writing (arranging the ideas into coherent text) and development (playtesting and fine-tuning) for the buyer. It wouldn't be a large game, but then not every game needs to be. Somethinglike thiswould be entirely doable.
    I dunno, even five pages of pure source material isn't enough for my own personal tastes. The one thing that always pains me about the Indie gaming scene is that so many games don't bother with world-building or are insanely brief and vague with their background. If you look at a lot of mainstream products, the core rules are perhaps less than a quarter of the book, with the rest being taken up with setting-specific rules or fluff material.

    But like I said it depends what the buyer wants.

    -Ash
  • edited February 2010
    Posted By: DestriarchAnd that's another point of course, presumably you'll be selling each image more than once. Can't really do that with most RPG writing.
    Hell yeah ya can. Palladium anybody? Plenty of those rulebooks reproduce the exact same text (and art, incidentally), not just the same rules.

    (Then there's iterative design a la White Wolf and Burning Wheel, or the myriad rewrites of Basic D&D.)

    Whether or not it would be a good idea, I don't see how it would be too hard to rewrite a couple rules for a game system you've got done already, and then whip up some colour fiction, if somebody had art they wanted a game for. Would you charge for the words you've already written? $100 is like only 5,000 words, after all.

    edit: Oh, and nice art, by the way.
  • Posted By: JohnstoneHell yeah ya can. Palladium anybody? Plenty of those rulebooks reproduce the exact same text (and art, incidentally), not just the same rules.
    Well, I'm thinking more from the point of view of a freelancer selling to a publisher than a publisher selling to the end user. I shouldn't expect that Palladium paid more than once for the repeated segments, assuming even that freelancers had anything to do with the writing - I don't know what their business model is, never having been interested in the Palladium games.

    -Ash
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