Gamer Dudes Afraid of Fashion (Shocking!)

edited December 2009 in Story Games
[This is a continuation from the December Stuff to Watch thread.]

It started with a link to Put This On (a fashion ideas weblog).

The three following comments in the thread are all hostile snark suggesting that anyone with specific fashion tips is making a personal attack on... something. I don't know exactly. Freedom? Puppies?

Basically, some gamer nerds were shown a fashion blog and they reacted to it like vampires exposed to sunlight.

I find this hilarious. It's like it was scripted. Except if they did it on Big Bang Theory we would probably all roll our eyes at the stupid cliche of it.
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Comments

  • Hey, I can dress if I want to. I will refrain from posting pics.

    Basically, anybody can look good by picking up a few magazines and spending some money. Can you look good without it? How do we define dressing well? Is this some sort of hegemonic discourse that I'm excluded from if I'm poor or marginalised? What are we to make of a blog that features a past president of the United States as an example of dressing well?

    Is Dressing Like a Grownup a provocative title?
  • Hey droog,

    You're pretty much answering your own questions, aren't you?
    It seems like you're saying: fashion is a hegemonic discourse that one is excluded from if they are poor or marginalized.
    This seems to be a foregone conclusion, in your post.

    And one that I can understand and support. Not only that, but it's often fiercely nationalist, race-targeted, and gender segregated. Further, the site linked is clearly targeted at white males of a "professional" age and class, and seems to imply that they are the pinnacle of "grownup", and thus maturity and wealth.

    It's like society can be at its worst when fashion comes to the forefront of conversation, hey?

    We can acknowledge that while simultaneously acknowledging that being conscientious about how you dress, and caring about your own fashion, and caring about the world of fashion... is fine. Some people really enjoy it, and they like turning themselves into art, and they think fashion is how that happens. Some people like to dress for a specific purpose, or a specific image, and both of those things are also fine.

    So, like... A (the fashion industry has negatives) doesn't need to dominate B (fashion can be fun to think about). And more importantly, A doesn't even need to show up in a conversation about B.

    I say this because I feel like you're attacking "fashion" itself, and in doing so are attacking those who enjoy thinking about it.
  • Oh boy do I feel like a nerd now. Thanks for pointing out. I guess nerds don't like dressing up like douchebags?
  • I don't understand the vehement anti-fashion rhetoric of so many gamers. I mean, I used to game with some computer programmers who would spend hundreds of dollars on a wardrobe of black t-shirts with "witty" sayings (though still wear the same ratty jeans all the time). For the same amount of money, they could have bought a decent wardrobe.

    To answer droog: dude, shopping in goodwill is quite fashionable. I went to a going-out-of-business secondhand store with some friends and saw my boyfriend pick up a half-dozen skinny ties and a gorgeous vintage leather blazer (!) for $7. Yes, seven dollars.

    I don't understand it. I think there's some kind of cultural signifier in being poorly dressed. Now that I think of it, I also know nerds who would never spend money on clothing, but will spend $500 on a pair of geek-chic designer frames for their glasses. Because glasses -> intelligence -> nerd. But clothes that fit, coordinate, and are clean and pressed -> that guy who used to shove nerds in his locker and date the hot girls? I don't know.
  • That site sucks. It's a step on the natural evolution of consumer capitalism to make men as beholden to "fashion" as women. It's one thing to find a mode of dress that makes one comfortable with oneself and with society, it's something else to be told which expensive watch or bike will give you a certain social caché. Is that site from Toronto? :)
  • edited December 2009
    Just two other things, real quick.

    I'm fashion-obsessed and an aspiring fashion photographer: I own two pairs of pants that fit, both of which need some love from a needle and thread, and a handful of shirts which are mostly hand-me-downs, as well as a handful of dresses. I can't afford to dress like chicks in Vanity Fair (not that they make clothing in my size anyway), but I'm not mad about it. I feel like presenting yourself well is a necessity if you want to be taken seriously in life.

    Second, you could get JFK's look from the blog for $30 at Target, less on sale. What's so othering to you guys about a T-shirt, sweater, and khakis? I'm genuinely curious.

    Bonus PS: These tips for shopping well are fucking golden, for every income level.
  • I'm with Elizabeth and John on this one. I can look good with clothes that don't cost me any more then looking like a typical geek, and I enjoy that.

    (I also think that 'typical geek' is changing, a lot of my coworkers are very, very nerdy and yet dress somewhat respectably)
  • Just like food blogs are telling you "what to eat" (and mocking people without access to proper food) and entertainment blogs are telling you "what to enjoy" (and mocking those without access to media).

    How dare they.
  • It's weird how people are taking criticisms that are applied specifically to this one blog and then extrapolating that nerds have some issue with dressing well. The site does have some good advice, but the style they are putting forth, at least from the most recent posts, is pretty horrific. Some kind of weird blend of new england preppy and modern urban designer with a dash of machismo ("you can wear while putting your fist through a wall") and an eye towards recession-era budgeting. English tan!? No man wearing english tan gets on my yacht, I can tell you that.
  • Interesting. I haven't ever thought about it as a nerd thing, but I am pretty fashion-hostile. I can rationalize it as well, and in ways that I don't think have anything to do with nerds in specific. To wit: fashion is superficial, while my life is spent in deep thought and striving for excellence with the substantial pursuits of truth, beauty and goodness. Fashion is just one of the shallow things people use to distract themselves from the meaningful things of life, so I don't have time for it. Consequently my clothing is exactly whatever happens to be on hand, no more and no less.

    Now, considering a rationalization like that, if anybody chooses to ascribe my attitude to "nerdiness", what can I say? That's not a self-selected label, that's just somebody else categorizing me. I don't even really understand the whole nerd thing as a subculture, we didn't have anything like that where I grew up.
  • I am hyperaware of how I dress when I'm at nerd events, like conventions and meetups and such. I want to look like a grownup. Whether I succeed is in the eye of the beholder, I suppose. The anti-fashion hostility that I see create kneejerk anti-anti-fashion hostility in me. I literally do not understand why someone would choose to wear clothes that they don't look good in if they have the option not to do so.

    [self-analysis] This may be because I spent many years wearing ill-fitting clothes due to extremely negative self-image, and so to me they're a symbol of feeling badly about myself. [/self-analysis]

    Most of my clothes are from Filene's Basement, TJ Maxx, Target, H&M and second-hand stores. My glasses cost 20 bucks. I'm a full-time grad student. It's possible to dress well on a budget.

    And I really, really like Put This On.

    My opinions are now on the internet.
  • Nothing looks good/fashionable on me right now. Once I'm done dropping 50 lbs (30 to go!) I may return to the pseudo clothes horse mode I was in through high school and much of my 20s. But I'll still do a lot of shopping at Goodwill. Maybe it's just my neighborhood, but I can find beautiful high thread count Italian and French stuff that I like for ~$8/shirt when I'm willing to check back now and then.

    I don't spend much time thinking about what I wear right now but I never have and never will spend much money on it.
  • John, what are you looking to get out of this thread exactly?
    ...and can I somehow give you that?
  • Well the pocket squares were pretty awesome, in any case. I kinda liked the loafers, too, but a bit out of my price range these days.
  • There is a serious thing with geeks and t-shirts. A lot of people I know spend a lot of money on clothes to look pretty bad. I can definitely see "poorly dressed" as part of the geek identity, and anything that threatens geek identity ... well, you know.

    I've started paying more attention to my clothes (and to what I eat, not in a dieting sense but in an "eat food that tastes good" sense) in the last few years. Consequentially, I spend less money on food and clothes than I did previously. This is good, because I'm also poorer than I used to be. As residents of the industrialized world, painting fashion as a poor v. rich issue is ridiculous. If Chinese factory workers can afford to dress well then so can I, the American grad student.

    yrs--
    --Ben
  • Posted By: northerainOh boy do I feel like a nerd now. Thanks for pointing out. I guess nerds don't like dressing up like douchebags?
    Untrue.
  • I don't have the freedom to post much right now but I feel a little put off by the reading that I was against that blog or fashion in general. If anything, I'm against the bland crap the blog was pushing. The sartorialist it ain't. I'm a bit of a fashion snob in most cases.

    More later. Basically, nerds good. Fashion good. That's my stance.
  • I'm not even 'fashion-hostile', though I've never quite been in the haute-couture bracket. I used to sneer at badly-dressed geeks too.

    I got better, though. Fashion IS superficial, and it IS about following rich, beautiful role-models. And anybody with an eye for it can tell your Target specials from real quality.

    By all means, dress to impress. First impressions count, clothes maketh the man etc. But don't tell me I'm a nerd for having an opinion. Maybe I think you look like a nerd in your preppy gear.
  • Posted By: reactionPosted By: northerainOh boy do I feel like a nerd now. Thanks for pointing out. I guess nerds don't like dressing up like douchebags?
    Untrue.

    Yeah, that's a judgment that will last until you see your first rape-joke t-shirt.

    I try to maintain a pretty solid 'dress like a fucking adult' policy - I have scruffy clothes that I wear when I don't give a shit, some pretty sharp clothes for job interviews and other situations where I care about making a good impression, and the rest of what I own and wear falls in a category I like to think of as 'clothes that look okay without implying that I have a substantial portion of my identity invested in them'.

    Wearing clothes that aggressively reject concern for your appearance isn't functionally different from any other fashion statement. Just stinkier.
  • edited December 2009
    I've got nothing against fashion (well, no more than the average low-income male who values durability and inexpensiveness over being "in style", anyway)...but that blog's pretty weak, no matter how you look at it. I can't discern any overarching aesthetic message to the items it features, any style that unites those items, or for that matter anything in the way of useful advice for someone who wanders in there and wants to know more about "dressing well." So I've got no problem with people mocking that blog specifically -- it seems to be intensely useless to anyone who isn't the guy running it.

    That said, I understand that "dressing well" is an invaluable social skill that frequently becomes an artform in its own right. I know that there are places in this world where I will go and people will really and truly give a shit about what my wristwatch looks like or how expensive my shoes are, for good or for ill. I know that there are other situations in which "dressing appropriately" will pay off a thousand times over. I also suspect that there are some types of clothing that I would absolutely look good in (although finding those ensembles has always been hit-or-miss for me), just as there are some outfits I will never be able to wear without looking like a jackass (or worse, feeling like one). I know that I can use clothing to easily fit myself into a social group and be accepted, or to set myself apart from it and send other messages instead.

    I also know that, as a guy, I'm lucky that -- as complicated as fashion is and as significant an impact as it has on my everyday life -- I'm playing in the minor leagues, here. Seriously: women have been eyeball-deep in this for centuries, whether they wanted to be or not. The kinds of fashion choices and options and external judgments I deal with are nothing -- fucking nothing -- compared to the labyrinth they have to negotiate, starting almost from the moment that they become capable of dressing themselves. (And yes, I do cringe at the thought of men's fashion ever becoming as...well, as fashionable as women's; not because I think it's an assault on my masculinity or my group affiliations, but because I'm just plain scared of that much complexity. I don't have the tools or the training for that system, and if there's any possible way I can avoid ever having to engage with it on any level other than the dumbed-down one I'm currently part of, halle-fucking-lujah.)

    And so if there was a source for men's fashion information that addressed both my needs (i.e., tell me why some things look good and others don't, tell me what my clothing choices mean in a larger context, tell me how I can dress appropriately for situations without bankrupting myself, etc.) and my fears (reassure me that changing my wardrobe does not mean I am stepping into a morass of high-level social games that I cannot play effectively or entertainingly), by god, I'd read it. But putthison.com clearly ain't that. I don't know what it is -- maybe just the author's "Oh, I think this looks cool" aggregator -- but it's definitely not a useful general fashion blog by any stretch of the imagination.
  • Eh. I don't know. Fashion is superficial in the way that all art is superficial. It's about beauty, which many people will tell you is superficial and not meaning enough to bother with. But for a lot of people, me included, finding beauty in everything is important, as is making a statement-- which fashion is an excellent medium for doing (And not just in a "My other car is the death star" kind of a way).

    I do object to the idea that fashion is about following rich, beautiful role-models. I mean, there are plenty of Trendy Wendys who are all about the next big thing. But where do you think the next big thing comes from? Do you think there's a big committee room somewhere where Heidi Klum and Nina Garcia hold court over a bunch of butt-kissers and decide lime is the new burnt umber? Please. True surprise and innovation in fashion comes from outside influences. Fashion-the-industry watches the street. Fashion-the-concept is about a personal point of view that is visually arresting and communicates something to the people who see it.

    Some people don't know how to talk about fashion, the same way some people don't know how to talk about wine or art or game design or whatever else that can be summed up with "I don't know [blank], but I know what I like." I saw this with my ex-husband who went from living in hawaiian shirts and hot topic closeouts to shopping at the Armani Exchange and checking the seams on everything he tried on. (Trying clothes on! Can you believe it?) He knew the kind of message he wanted to give, but he didn't know how to get there. There was a big lightbulb that went off one day when he said, "You know, I think shirts with words are doing me more harm than good." Blogs with specific advice-- that advertise clothes you may not like but explain what is good about those clothes-- help you figure out how to talk about what you like as well as what you don't like, and introduce you to fundamental concepts that you can riff off of.

    I just bought the Alinea restaurant cookbook. Do I plan on getting a crapton of molecular gastronomy food additives, black truffles and custom servicewear and making stuff like granola in a rosewater envelope for dinner? Of course not. But it's introducing me to a new way to think about food and the construction of flavor and texture profiles that's well worth the book's pricetag. Fashion is like that, too.
  • In the spirit of contributing something useful to the conversation... here are a few fashion blogs that I enjoy.
    The Houndstooth Kid A very cool, vintage-style blog.
    An Affordable Wardrobe Pretty self explanatory.

    And I always find A Suitable Wardrobe interesting.
  • edited December 2009
    Posted By: ElizabethBlogs with specific advice-- that advertise clothes you may not like but explain what is good about those clothes -- help you figure out how to talk about what you like as well as what you don't like, and introduce you to fundamental concepts that you can riff off of.
    This, by the way, is exactly the kind of blog that I would want to find for men's fashion. Obviously, Put This On isn't that blog -- so where can I find it?
  • Fashion is a lot more than a bunch of made-up arbitrary standards. At root it's about wearing clothes that make you feel good and look good on you.

    Fashion is not the art of selling overpriced clothes to suckers. That's crap masquerading as fashion.

    The thing is, this actually takes a bit of effort. It's easy to buy "fashionable" clothes that make you look terrible and feel awful to wear. I bought some damn "relaxed fit" jeans because I want to look relaxed. Instead I look really tense because I'm afraid my jeans will fall down and show my underwear. That's my bad for not thinking through my fashion purchase. I can't wait till these damn things wear out.

    So yes, dress like a grown up; that's my New Year's Resolution; but not Put This On style, because I don't like the stuff on their blog.
  • edited December 2009
    Posted By: Accounting for Taste
    And so if there was a source for men's fashion information that addressed both my needs (i.e., tell me why some things look good and others don't, tell me what my clothing choices mean in a larger context, tell me how I can dress appropriately for situations without bankrupting myself, etc.) and my fears (reassure me that changing my wardrobe does not mean I am stepping into a morass of high-level social games that I cannot play effectively or entertainingly), by god, I'd read it. But putthison.com clearly ain't that. I don't know what it is -- maybe just the author's "Oh, I think this looks cool" aggregator -- but it's definitely not a useful general fashion blog by any stretch of the imagination.
    I present to you the DETAILS Men's Style Manual. Enjoy.

    Also, the dirty truth: if there are any fashion games that dressing well would opt you into, you're already playing and you don't know it. If no one around you gives a shit what you wear, then no one will be trying to show you up or whatever else you're afraid of. If those games do exist in your life, then people are already judging you by what you choose to wear. And effort always gets higher marks than no effort at all.
  • edited December 2009
    Posted By: John HarperJust like food blogs are telling you "what to eat" (and mocking people without access to proper food) and entertainment blogs are telling you "what to enjoy" (and mocking those without access to media).
    I think that's unfair: A lot of us are kinda like walkerp: I was thinking about dropping a comment in the December thread, but I might as well here: I like fashion. I'm even in favor of the nexus that lies between gaming and real design/fashion. And I hate this site.

    This "Put This On" blog *sucks*. Suuuuuuuuuuuccccckkkkkkkks. It's nothing but white male yuppie zilch fashion bullshit. Every piece of fashion there (exceptions noted 2 paragraphs below) looks like it crawled out of a British garden party of the late 60s/early 70s. The shoes, the coats, the shirts, the slacks, the BOWTIES (!!!), all of it. If I had a time machine and wanted to score with genteel willowy upper-class Brits in the late 60s, I'd check this blog regularly. But otherwise, it's total trash.

    Now, I went back about 8 pages' worth of "Older Posts" to come to that determination, it wasn't one or two pics that got me in an uproar. I was horrified right off the bat by the front page, but going back further and further confirmed it: A site that tells me to put THIS bullshit on, and I'm not a lumberjack, needs to be resoundly mocked.

    However, I'm not against the message. In fact, About one in every of their 15-20 blog posts they Get It Right. Usually a post on tuxedos or someshit. But everything else should be flushed away.

    When I go looking for fashion, I basically start busting open some copies of MONO (unfortunately there's few such fashion/item/lifestyle magazines for men). Like here:

    http://www.monomaga.net/mono/shop/top.aspx

    http://www.monomagazine.com/

    MONO's online store

    Now, when I go to game conventions and the like, I usually dress up in my Novyi Russkiy best: Cheap matching trainer pants and blazer/hoodie, sunglasses, expensive shoes. I keep it relaxed more than pimpin.

    But my average day style? Most days at work I look like I crawled out of a Tommy Bahama catalog: Solid Hawaiian shirt, cargo pants, dockers or Merells.
    At home, I favor urbanwear, baggy hoodies and the like.
    I don't do "Business Casual". It's a fucking trap of blandness, with bizarre rules and non-rules depending on where you work, what you do. On jobs, I either go business-and-casual (above Hawaiian shirts and sometimes dressier pants), or dive straight into clean pressed slacks, ties, sportcoat, and hell even a suit vest if I can get away with it. Posh banker, or Old Europe hitman.

    Currently, I'm losing some weight to be able to get better clothes, and hand-in-hand with that I'm aiming to get more dressier clothes: A new formal jacket, slacks and the like. Heck, maybe even a traditional ascot/cravat: Whatever it takes to avoid being seen with a bowtie, which is what "Put This On" recommends a few times.

    So for real, fashion: Bring it on. Heck, this thread even got me thinking about dressing up a bit (and no, I won't take no fucking pictures) at the next NC Gameday or meetup. But "Put This On" is not the site from which to learn about any fashion that I'd want seen on a person that wasn't captured in a Polaroid from 1968, at a "Thank the stars I was born white!" party in the English idyllic countryside.

    In geek terms? It's a gaming blog (yay!) that only advocates adversarial GM-against-those-dumbass-players style of roleplaying (booooo!), where every one in 15-20 posts is something that you'd ever find useful to use at your table.

    -Andy
  • That's what's called 'fashion victim', Tony.
  • I just want to know easy ways to fold the pocket squares personally. I'll wing the rest.
  • Bowties are sexy, Andy. I don't know what you're talking about.
  • Bowties are a very clear indicator of a certain type of upper-middle class professional who likes to be thought of as a bit zany and different.
  • Personally, I think gamer-nerd guy fashion should be more like, I dunno, based on Dr. Who wardrobe concept sketches or something. You know, something largely normalish with some kind of quirky tidbits that make it just a bit...off.
  • edited December 2009
    Posted By: Andy*sucks*.Suuuuuuuuuuuccccckkkkkkkks. It's nothing but white male yuppie zilch fashion bullshit. Every piece of fashion there (exceptions noted 2 paragraphs below) looks like it crawled out of a British garden party of the late 60s/early 70s. The shoes, the coats, the shirts, the slacks, theBOWTIES(!!!), all of it. If I had a time machine and wanted to score with genteel willowy upper-class Brits in the late 60s, I'd check this blog regularly. But otherwise, it's total trash.
    Let's not paint all willowy upper-class Brits in the late 60s with such a stuffy brush:
    image
  • It's like somebody wanted to illustrate 'fashion victim'....
  • Posted By: ElizabethAlso, the dirty truth: if there are any fashion games that dressing well would opt you into, you're already playing and you don't know it. If no one around you gives a shit what you wear, then no one will be trying to show you up or whatever else you're afraid of. If those games do exist in your life, then people are already judging you by what you choose to wear. And effort always gets higher marks than no effort at all.
    Well, yes, obviously: but men's fashion games (at least in the circles I would be comfortable moving in, i.e., not the Friends of High Fashion Designers crowd) are at least an order of magnitude less complicated than women's fashion games. The same judgments get made and the same stakes are on the table, but the boundaries of that game are much, much smaller. And really, I want to be reassured that this will always be the case, because while I've had girlfriends who made fashion look easy, I personally find it to be anything but. If men's fashion ever develops that kind of overwhelming complexity, I will just admit defeat, wear a potato sack, and go live in a cave.
  • Posted By: droogThat's what's called 'fashion victim', Tony.
    It's sad but true. The really sad thing is, I know better. *hangs head*
  • So surfing around for a few secs brought me to some cool Man-Centric fashion pages. Stuff that I find tolerable, unlike Put This On:

    (also, Elizabeth, thanks for the Details book rec, that looks cool)

    The Men's Fashion Blog contains too many "catwalk"-style disasters, but otherwise it's got cool GQ-style posts here and there.

    A-Man-Fashion blog, again a catwalk here and there (catwalk == don't bother unless you're a French Model in France) but lots of other solid recs. This is one I might follow for a bit.

    GQ and Details. GQ is classy when it sticks to slick dress-up, and Details is fun but a little too J-Crew-centric (everyone walks around wearing what the Jin Blossoms would wear if they were still being photographed today: Far too White at times), otherwise ok.

    See Jack Shop is fashion meets a budget. Slick focus.

    The Urban Gentleman is exactly what I'm looking for in a fashion blog. Hip, solid, and still holds some originality: Gives you hope for finding cool threads that go well together without looking like the pretty white people in the GAP ads. A little too gold-watch/bling focused, but otherwise this is a double thumbs up from me, simply because this is the kind of style that I can really get into.

    image

    I mean, look at that. This old dude is Dressed the Fuck Up.

    Also, the focus on urban style while being stylish appeals to me. You can look slick without having to jump at suits and ties:

    image

    So, anyway, there.

    To bring it back to gaming... uh... maybe that dude there can store some dice in those breast pockets? :-)
  • I don't have anything against fashion either. I just didn't see the connection between ''this blog looks terrible'' and the conclusion ''lol nerds are scared of fashion''.
  • Reading "Put This On," I feel like shouting "Clothes *do* come in colors other than tan!" Of course, every time I go clothes shopping I get the urge to say the same to the people at half the stores. I probably could stand to try a little harder, but of course this thread came along to inspire me right when I'm broke, and my social circles are such that there's zero peer pressure about such things.

    But on a more serious note, when I look at the kinds of things "Gamer Dudes" are into and create, I get the impression that we're not dealing with a group that has a great aesthetic sense in general, except for the ones that are specifically about art. But on the other hand a lot of the artists I know seem to pick out clothes more with the Scott Adams priorities ("Cover my privates, prevent me from getting cold") on hand, so that might not mean anything in and of itself.
    Posted By: ElizabethBowties are sexy, Andy. I don't know what you're talking about.
    This is another example of why fashion is kind of like art: nothing about it is particularly objective. Bowties always make me think of Orville Redenbacher hawking popcorn and Tucker Carlson ruining Crossfire.
  • Posted By: Andyimage

    I mean, look at that. This old dude is Dressed the Fuck Up.
    He also looks like he's concerned Crockett and Tubbs are onto what his real business is and may be spying on him at this very moment!
  • Also, if you want more non-whitey fashion, there is no greater designer in the world of men's fashion than Oswald Boateng. He almost makes me wish I were a dude.

    Un. Be. Lievable.
  • As for the website "Put This On", I have to agree with the majority here and say that it isn't a good fashion site at all, and more of a detail of the uniform that you are meant to wear. This is not surprising to me as one of the writers of the blog is Jesse Thorn, co-host of the humor podcast Jordan Jesse GO! I find his comedy to be at its core concerned with subtly mocking other people while at the same time making himself seem better. Not a very charitable person in my eyes.

    My own personal fashion development began in college. I moved from a big-small town in central Jersey to Philadelphia to attend an arts school and pursue my love of illustration. While I was there I found that while I had applied my own sense of design to the art I was creating and looked for those things in the world around me, I didn't apply that aesthetic to myself. It seemed hypocritical. I changed.

    I'm big into line; it is the foundation of design, after all. I find button-up dress shirts to be really comfortable. I like ties. I think they look cool (Look! Another line!) and can be used to add some nice colours without them being overwhelming. I'm a fat guy, so I look for pants that don't sag at the crotch or make my legs look stubby. I'm on my feet a lot at work, so I find shoes that are really comfortable. I work retail and get the very occasional bit of freelance illustration work, so I make the exact opposite of a lot of money. Therefore, I also dress cheap.

    I say it's time to compare bits and bobs. Do you guys have a favourite piece of clothing in your closet? As for me, I have this great red and black striped tie that I have to keep myself from wearing every day ever because the angles and thicknesses of the lines are so perfect. It makes me just damned happy to look at it.
  • May I just step in and say that the utilikilt is pretty much the dumbest thing ever, and the fact that I see hordes of them every GenCon is proof positive that gamers absolutely do need some serious fashion advice?

    Anyway, I generally like Put This On, though I admit that they don't always feature clothing I would wear. They did a great video on buying and caring for jeans, though, and that hooked me.

    As I rapidly approach 40, I can see that there absolutely is truth to the idea of dressing "like a grownup". At a certain point, I realized that I would feel better—and people would think better of me—if I stopped dressing like I did when I was in college.
  • This thread is going rather well. Thanks everyone.
  • Posted By: AndyThis "Put This On" blog *sucks*.Suuuuuuuuuuuccccckkkkkkkks. It's nothing but white male yuppie zilch fashion bullshit. Every piece of fashion there (exceptions noted 2 paragraphs below) looks like it crawled out of a British garden party of the late 60s/early 70s.
    I thought it was classic American preppy wear. Like my dull housemate in California used to wear (the one who listed his short term-goals as "Gain experience of satellite systems", medium-term ones as "Be a team leader in satellite systems" and long-term goals as "Be a manager in satellite systems").

    Luckily, we have a Gap nearby, so if I ever want to dress the way Put This On tells me, I'm all set*.

    Graham

    * As I understand you guys say.
  • John, you were right. You're totally on your way to becoming Luke. Post some crotchetiness = 45-post thread.
  • Can we put jeans and a t-shirt in perspective? Why is this 'college clothes'? It is the daily uniform of half the world. Half the working class world, that is. It's practical, it's cheap if you don't insist on designer jeans and logo t-shirts, it can be put together from any mass outlet. You can wear it with boots, or runners, or even what Yanks call flip-flops and we call thongs.
  • I called them thongs when I was a kid.
  • edited December 2009
    image
  • I'd love to be better dressed. I just don't want to use the necessary time and effort.
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