[Fantasy Craft] Has anyone got this book/played it?

Has anyone played Fantasy Craft? What's it like? Good points, bad points?

Comments

  • I have it (in PDF) but haven't played it. It's very meaty, so I'm taking some time to read through and understand it before I make a decision about it "overall", do you have any specific questions I can answer while I am thinking?
  • I wanted to know how it all played out. With the table of contents from the preview, I can guess as to what it's divided into, but I'm wondering if it is a cohesive whole.
  • I, like Jason, have it (in PDF) but am yet to play it. It feels pretty cohensive, but I think the expectation is that you throw some of it out for your own campaign (maybe limiting races / magic etc). Balance was/is a real strength in Spycraft 2.0, IMHO, so I'm not expecting it to be a problem in Fantasy Craft. Looking at the Crafty Games forums, they've made some interesting design decisions with races and classes that they seem to be sticking to pretty strongly (priests aren't the party healer, dwarves can't swim, etc) which I, personally, like.
  • Are these decisions obvious in the book, or only down the road when you're fording a river and you realize your dwarf can't swim and the priest can't seem to revive you?
  • Player: "I attack the orc leader!"

    GM: "Ah, but high elves such as your character can't wield broadswords unless they're made out of silver."

    Player: "..."

    GM: "And only at night. On Sundays. Under the new moon. Oh, and orcs are your friends."

    (I should hope these decisions are obvious in cgen! ;)
  • Yeah, they are explicit in character gen, in the write-ups of the races. The races, by the way, include drakes (actual dragons, not some half-assed 'dragonborn' humanoid) and rootwalkers (frickin' ents!). There are feats to mitigate some of these restrictions.
  • There's a pretty lengthy thread on Fantasycraft over at RPGnet.
  • Thanks, Justin!
    Posted By: Josh RobyPlayer: "I attack the orc leader!"
    GM: "Ah, but high elves such as your character can't wield broadswords unless they're made out of silver."
    Player: "..."
    GM: "And only at night. On Sundays. Under the new moon. Oh, and orcs are your friends."
    (I should hope these decisions are obvious in cgen! ;)
    Just so you all know, this is something that kind of happened with me (character gen not making certain things obvious). We got through burning our characters for the Wheel and when our first encounter was done, it was only then that I noticed what it means to have an Obstacle higher than the number of dice you have. Thus, character advancement, which seemed obvious in the text, became something completely different in play.
  • I picked up a copy at GenCon and played in an event run by the company. Unfortunately, the event sucked, but that was mostly due to a bad GM and unfocused, weird players. (Such are the perils of playing trad games at cons, I'm afraid.)

    Nonetheless, it looks pretty damn cool. It has all of the cool bits from Spycraft (Action Dice, campaign qualities, subplots, easy NPC creation, etc). The main thing I like about it is that the game focuses on helping you create content for your campaign, rather than selling you lots of setting. E.g., there are only a few magic items in the book, but there's an extensive section on how create your own. And by "create," I don't mean in-game crafting tules. I mean lists and tables to generate cool items with which to populate your adventures. The same goes for NPCs and monsters. There's also nifty rules for Reputation, i.e., another thing your PC is striving to accumulate. You get Rep for adventuring, owning magic items, etc, and can trade that rep for favors and renown.

    I dunno. I don't get why anyone is excited about Pathfinder when FantasyCraft is around.
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